Postpartum Anxiety

For the "must keep" tasks, make a daily to-do list so you aren't trying to keep track of everything in your head. Even if it is on sticky notes, this little bit of organization can keep headaches on the shelf where they belong.

Be Kind to Yourself

Putting yourself down only creates more stress and anxiety. It also sets you up on a never-ending and ugly downward spiral. Buy yourself some flowers, go for a special walk, take yourself out to lunch. Give yourself a compliment, and make sure it sticks!

Take a Hike or a Swim

Gentle aerobic exercise two or three times a week can lower your depression and boost your mood. According to Dr. Bennett, you'll feel better about yourself when you're doing something active to help yourself recover.

Foods that Help

Certain foods offer a helpful hand in increasing serotonin levels. Nibbling on protein-rich foods like meat, fish or eggs about every three hours helps keep your blood sugar even and boost serotonin levels. Some women find drinking whey protein shakes easier than trying to chew and swallow food.

Add in legumes and whole grains to your diet. Carbohydrates from these sources can raise your serotonin as well.

Good fats help boost brain chemicals such as serotonin and dopamine. Your body can't make these on its own so you need to include them in your diet. Flax seed, hemp seeds, walnuts, cold water fish, and kidney beans are terrific sources of omega-3 for your body.

Filter What You Read Online

"What? Why would I want to do that," you ask yourself. It's no secret that we're bombarded with thousands of messages, positive and negative from all over the place. While we always want you to enjoy what we offer here on Pregnancy.org, it's important to keep positive.

"Information on the Web and in the news is often very negative. Negative information just doesn't help your worries. Web information isn't filtered so you're often anxious about misinformation, anyway," Dr. Bennett states.

Stick to websites that make you feel good (like us!).

Find Activities That Work for You

If an activity increases your level of anxiety, the logical thing to do is stop doing it. Trust your instincts. Your friends might swear by listening to meditation tapes or trying deep breathing exercises. If those types of activities frustrate you, then don't do them.

Whether you choose to walk around the block, read light fluff, fold laundry or even clean the dishes, find what helps calm you down or relax you.

Please Accept Help

Anxiety and other postpartum mood disorders tend to isolate women. Go ahead and lean on someone -- emotionally and physically. A wonderful therapist, good friend or an understanding support group can speed up your return to a "you" that you can recognize.

What's helped you or a friend overcome postpartum anxiety? Your tips could help change a person's life!

Copyright © Pregnancy.org.