Third Trimester: You and Your Partner

As you enter your third trimester, the last phase of your pregnancy, physical intimacy with your partner and his feelings about your new baby may change dramatically. Some of these adjustments may have begun earlier in your pregnancy, but they reach a peak during the third trimester.

Sexuality

  • Desire and activity - As your body grows, you may experience more physical discomforts when having sexual intercourse. Your increased body weight and enlarged abdomen may necessitate different positions, women on top or rear entry, or alternate methods of sexual satisfaction.
  • Safety Concerns - If your comfort permits, and your provider hasn't recommended that you restrict or abstain from sexual activity, sexual intercourse will not be harmful to you or your baby. Your mucus plug and amniotic sac protect your baby from injury. However, oral genital sexual activity has been associated with air embolism during late pregnancy, so blowing air into the vaginal area must be avoided.

Your Partner's Participation in Your Pregnancy

Sometime between the 26th week of your pregnancy and your date of delivery, your partner's interest may shift from concern for you, to also getting ready for your new baby. There is little doubt that most fathers attach to their babies before they are born. However, the level of attachment depends on their relationship with the mother.

You can nurture and help him prepare for his role as father by encouraging him to:

  • Support you in maintaining healthy nutrition habits and lifestyles choices, such as not smoking or drinking
  • Accompany you to your prenatal visits
  • Attend childbirth preparation classes with you
  • Tour the hospital with you
  • Think and talk about the baby and changes in your lifestyle
  • Talk with other fathers
  • Read or watch videos about pregnancy, labor, delivery, and fatherhood
  • Shop for the baby, with and without you
  • Get the baby's room ready
  • Share in the birth experience during labor and delivery

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