Seeking ADHD info

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ChristaM's picture
Joined: 01/11/04
Posts: 713
Seeking ADHD info

Hi:

My 6 year old daughter was recently diagnosed ADHD; we go for a neurologist exam on Feb. 26. In the mean time, I'm looking for information on good resources, online or print, tips, advice, etc. We live in Illinois if that makes a difference at all. Trying to educate myself so that I can be a positive advocate for her. We are fortunate this year that her kindergarten teacher has an adult son who is also ADHD, so she is well educated and prepared to assist in the classroom this year. But, I want to be sure we set her up for success moving forward as well.

Thanks,
Christa

CrysRee31's picture
Joined: 06/01/11
Posts: 1473

I'm a fan of ADDitude Magazine they have a great website even if you don't subscribe. I get a regular email newsletter (free) from them as well. Tons of information and tips not just for parents. You may find it even more helpful than I because there are plenty of articles related to education that don't pertain to us as we're in Canada Smile

My daughter was diagnosed at 7 and let me tell you as hard as it is it gets better! The more you know the easier it can be Smile

Oh and any questions feel free to PM me Smile

HockeyTownMom's picture
Joined: 05/20/02
Posts: 417

I'm going to keep my eye on this, ds age 5 was just diagnosed in November.

MissyJ's picture
Joined: 01/31/02
Posts: 3229

Hi Christa (& all),

I know we have a number of articles onsite that you may find beneficial. Here are a few:

Is Your Daughter a Daydreamer - Undiagnosed AD/HD (This has additional resources listed.)

ADHD and Sleep

Friend-Making Skills for Kids with ADHD and Asperger's Syndrome

Physical activity may help kids with ADHD do well in school


Most families I've worked with (volunteer) following a diagnosis of ADD or ADHD have found CHADD (Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder) helpful both for online resources and local chapters support. There is a fee for membership though. If you need additional connections, drop me a note and I'll see what I can find out.

HTH,
~Missy

AVoiceInTheWilderness's picture
Joined: 01/19/06
Posts: 85

Have you looked into controlling through diet, supplements, theraputic essential oils?. My son was diagnosed with grand mal, frontal, absence seizures, 1 1/2 yrs ago. We went the med route first. 3 failures and I decided to take a natural approach. Since then, NO status epilepticus in 14 months and only 3 break throughs (frontal), that we know were due to diet/sleep being off. Just a consideration..Hang in there Smile

wishing4agirl's picture
Joined: 09/11/03
Posts: 917

Diet isn't actually such a strange idea Christa. I know lots of people who have done things with diet and the more natural approach and it helps greatly for Autism and I think I have heard of people mentioning ADHD. Especially eliminating gluten as it can cause behavior problems in some children while medical tests show negative for celiac disease. Just thought I'd ditto Marie's response.

HockeyTownMom's picture
Joined: 05/20/02
Posts: 417

It's a great idea...if they aren't picky eaters. My ds has only a few foods he'll actually eat.

wishing4agirl's picture
Joined: 09/11/03
Posts: 917

"HockeyTownMom" wrote:

It's a great idea...if they aren't picky eaters. My ds has only a few foods he'll actually eat.

I can relate. My son who is 7 is high functioning autistic and has SEVERE sensory issues. At one point they thought he had celiac disease and because testing was so inaccurate for his age at the time they needed us to try the diet. We did for a year. However he ate very little because of his food sensory issues. It was achievable but definitely challenging.

Christa, I think that is one of the diets I've heard some say that has helped their child with ADHD as gluten can cause behavior problems is some who are sensitive. And it's doesn't mean that you have to have Celiac Disease. You just have to be sensitive to gluten and the only way to test it is to go on the diet.

DrakePlusOne's picture
Joined: 06/29/09
Posts: 1889

Hi Christa! I wanted to respond b/c I have a severe ADHD son who was diagnosed at 3yo. It was a looooong hard battle to get his behavior under control and I understand how helpless you can feel in the beginning; looking at the long road ahead. I would compel you to look up the book '1, 2, 3 Magic' for yourself and the teachers addition to help out. For me, the tricky part was transitioning behavior modification to a school setting. Things that you find will work for you at home..... will a teacher be able to carry out in a school setting? I actual bought the book for teachers and brought it in to my son's K teacher and we devised a plan together. PPs suggested diet modification and I hope hope hope that it might work for your son. When I was trying anything before going to meds, we tried the diet. Our therapist suggested eliminating Red Dye as well as Gluten free. That might be something to look into as well.
As far as websites, I loved CHADD. It gives you info about laws and regulations schools MUST follow b/c your child is considered special needs. It really helped me feel armed with knowledge when sitting down with just about the whole school faculty. When I was at my wits end, this message board really helped me out ------> ADD Forums - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Support and Information Resources Community - Powered by vBulletin Other parents going though the same issues as you, sharing their stories and leaning on each other. There's also some great info on medications and side effects there as well, if you need to go down that path. Having other people to talk to and feel..... I guess, normal, about your situation is the biggest stress reliever in my opinion.
My son is just now getting his ADHD under control and he is 9. It takes awhile to get things figured out, and what works for one kid probably won't work for the next, but just know that you are an awesome mom and you WILL get this figured out! ((((hugs)))) Please, PM to vent, say 'hi', or just drop a line whenever. HTH

ChristaM's picture
Joined: 01/11/04
Posts: 713

Thank you Everyone -- does anyone know we can test for sensitivities? I know we can do alergy testing, but not sure on the sensitivity. We are looking at all options at this point -- and may just try and combine approaches Smile Really wish the neurology testing would get done sooner so we know for sure what all we are dealing with. Lots of useful info shared and I really appreciate it!

I did find some free webinars if others are interested:
Additudemag.com/webinars

wishing4agirl's picture
Joined: 09/11/03
Posts: 917

What we were told and what I've personally seen with some kids is that the tests they use either don't measure sensitivities AND the test can be "normal" but with the substance they are sensitive too is VERY obvious by behavior every time it's taken away and reintroduced. It's often more accurate to go off the substance/food and see.

shanrocks's picture
Joined: 02/20/13
Posts: 12

Some more tips from me

1. Praise praise praise! Catch her as often as you can being "good" or "quiet" or with a "calm body" and tell her how awesome she id doing being "quiet" or 'staying safe or calm".

2. Don't yell unless she is doing something or about to do something dangerous. You will feel like you need to yell at times, but that often will make things worse or more chaotic. She will not likely follow your direction if you are yelling.

3. Don't reprimand. Instead, when she does something "wrong" tell her to do exactly the opposite of what she is doing. For example: if she puts her hands near your 3 year old's glass and you think she is going to knock it over, instead of saying "Stop" or "Don't!", immediately like lightning get right in front of her, say in a calm 'indoor voice' while making eye contact, "Put your hands on your lap/down." Praise if/when she follows your direction.

4. Set up the environment to make it easier to prevent or react to her 'craziness'. If she is playing or engaged in an activity and you don't want her to mess with you 3 year old or your baby or the glass breakables on the other side of the room/house/etc., position yourself between her and whatever it is you want to keep her away from. OR make sure you have gates/doors closed, etc. Put things she continues to mess with or you are worried she might try to mess with out of reach or stored in closets/high spaces/tough to open containers. If she pours her milk out of a cup, next time, give her a sippy cup or literally hold the cup or move it out of her reach between sips/drinks.

5. If there are certain activities you anticipate being SUPER difficult or are just worried about something that could go wrong, find something special she can earn (trip to McDonald's or watch a special cartoon episode or something) if she does what she is supposed to do generally, for example without knocking stuff over, or without screaming, or whatever. But when you prep her for it, only talk about the positive to her. Tell her, OK, we get to go to McDonald's after ______ if you keep your hands and feet calm, your voice quiet, and your body and things safe.
Make sure (especially important) to praise her throughout when you see that she is following these 'rules' to remind her that what he is doing is going to get her something good in the end.

6. Sometimes, writing up (if she can read well) or making with pictures a schedule of the activities for the day can help reduce any frustration or high energy. Also, if you are going to do something that is not very structured or go to a place in which you can't structure everything (museum, zoo) explain to her beforehand what she needs to do or what her 'job' is (similar to above- keep safe hands, etc.). Include an incentive if necessary (trip to McDonald's or Cotton Candy at the end of the day - or once at lunch and once at dinner! or something that you think will be motivating for her) as well as a schedule that you can keep referring to. Getting a map in advance or online with different places/sites in the zoo/museum will help you create this schedule. After each activity/site visited and/or during, show her the visual schedule. Talk about "what we already did," "what we are doing now," and "what we will be doing next." Go through the remainder of the schedule if he wants to!

A lot of details I know, but if you try them, they will definitely help at least a little bit!