Homebirth?
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    Default Homebirth?

    Hi ladies...I'm pregnant with my second and considering a homebirth with a licensed midwife this time. I really love LOVE the idea of not having to rush to the hospital and having contractions in the car, and being able to just stay home and be relaxed and comfortable and have the people attending my birth come to ME. But I am a bit worried about something going wrong. DS had some serious decels during my labor with him, and I honestly think a homebirth midwife would have known what to do better. After all the internal monitoring and oxygen and general freaking out of the nurses, the doctor/surgeon they finally called in just had me lie on my left side and stop pushing. It seems like that should be pretty basic, like shouldn't a midwife know to do that?? Shouldn't all the nurses? But still, it makes me nervous, like what if it happens again and the midwife can't get the heart-rate back up? Yikes. But...anyone ever had a homebirth where something went slightly wrong but it all turned out fine anyway?
    Maggie
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    Community Host kridda_88's Avatar
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    Both of my boys had major heart decels when I was in the pushing stage. It's actually perfectly normal and changing position almost always fixes it. Midwifes know this SO MUCH better then doctors. And if the midwife still isn't liking it she will have you push like mad, at least that's what mine does, but that's what my dr had me do anyway. I also believe that pushing on your back it's more likely to happen then in any other position. It's going to happen, you are squishing the baby and the cord through your birth canal so it's bound to happen no matter where you are at, but there are positions you can get in to help with that and midwives know those positions the best and will help you get into them.

    Even with having both my boys go through the decels I still actually feel safer giving birth at home. I'm more worried about hemorrhaging while at home. lol. But my midwife can give me all the drugs a dr could if that happens anyway.
    K&S-8/18/07
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    Mega Poster krazykat's Avatar
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    Here is what my deciding factor was when I planned a homebirth (after a c/s) with DS: If you are in a hospital room and need a c/s it takes approximately 20-30 minutes to organize the staff (anesthesiologist, nurses, doctors...) and prep you for surgery. If you need to transfer in from a homebirth to have a c/s, if you call on your way, they can begin organizing the staff and prepping the OR, and as long as you are 20-30 minutes from the hospital it would be the same as if you were there to begin with.

    And a good midwife can normally see problems developing early in labor. The care is one on one so you are getting much more attention and observation from a MW than from a nurse who may have several other laboring moms and who may only be watching you primarily from a computer screen.

    There is so much less anxiety at home. You may worry a little about when exactly to call the MW but most likely you will be talking to her regularly by that point anyways. There are no bags to pack, no "perfect" time to go in to be admitted, and you have all the familiar smells and comforts of your own home.

    GL with your decision!

    ETA: I transferred in for a c/s with DS. He had h/r decels that were caught in time and thick meconium. My labor was extremely long (48 hours) as well. With those risk factors we caught it before it was a true emergency, but there were clear indicators of things going south. Baby boy ended up just fine
    Last edited by krazykat; 10-27-2011 at 06:38 PM.
    Ariel & John: Military Family since May 17, 2006

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    Posting Addict ErikaArcher's Avatar
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    I completely agree with Ariel.

    I had 2 homebirths and three kids...but all three were born at home

    The first one was a gorgeous labor and birth. At the very end the cord broke, but we didn't know it. (you can go back and read my birth stories in the story thread) There was concern over baby bc she was slow to breathe. There was concern over possible hemmorage. My Midwives were amazing, they knew exactly what to do. All was well. No hemmorage, baby began breathing with stimulation and a little O2. If I had been at the hospital there would have been MASS panic and irrigarless of the outcome (vaginal ro c-section) my baby would have been "Mandatory Observation in the NICU"

    My twins became intertangled. The docs would have never given me the patience the midwives did. I stalled out at 8cm for 7+ hours They would have c-sectioned me in a heartbeat. The midwives repositioned the babies as a last chance before transferring. Their years of expertise saved me from a hospital transfer and definative c-section.

    I am pro homebirth. But I don't think every baby should be born at home. Make a list of your wants/beliefs about birth and your fears, ask questions, explore ALL your options, and then decide where you will feel most safe. A birthing mom needs to feel safe. As a doula, I've seen clients have a really nice labor and then we go to the hospital; (planned hospital birth) and they stall out, shut down, become fearful, anxious, and worried. You'll find the best path for you

    Homebirthing, breastfeeding, sling wearing, cloth diapering momma to 3 girls ages 7 and 6 year old twins and peanut #4 due sometime in late September

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    Posting Addict momW's Avatar
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    Posting Addict Starryblue702's Avatar
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    The girls here have given you some great ideas to think about! I've had all of mine in a hospital, and will have this baby there as well. DH would never get on board with a homebirth, so I don't push the matter. I can labor naturally in the hospital as I like, so I guess there's our compromise lol... GL with your decision!!
    Krystal & Donovan - 12/2/06
    Reagan - 10/2/02
    Maximus - 3/10/05
    Liberty - 12/11/08
    Trystan- 11/22/11
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  7. #7
    Prolific Poster Winky_the_HouseElf's Avatar
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    I have had four home water births. Here are my thoughts:

    1. No birth option is risk-free. There are inherent risks to birth due to its being a biological process. Biological processes can experience complications. The risk of complications is low when the mother and baby are healthy and do not have any conditions that indicate potential problems.

    2. Most hospitals in the US approach ALL births as medical emergencies. That is why most have policies that mandate IVs, continuous monitoring, time limits, etc. These all come with risks and there is no evidence to show that these things improve safety in a normal birth. Because women are receiving medical treatment that neither they nor their babies need, they experience completely avoidable "side effects" (i.e. complications).

    3. If you are a healthy, low-risk mother carrying a healthy, low-risk baby AND you live where your only hospital options are places that do not practice evidence-based care, a home or birth center birth is less risky. Why? Because in a medically-minded hospital you'd take the inherent risks of birth and combine them with the risks of all those routine and *unnecessary* interventions. At home or at a birth center, you'd only be dealing with the risks inherent to birth. That is why the research shows that home birth is safe (or safer).

    4. If you are going to choose a home birth, it is so very important to choose a midwife who doesn't stay home with things that are not low-risk. Unfortunately, there is a growing number of midwives who take a cavalier, "trust birth" attitude toward what they call "variations of normal" that are actually complications. Case in point: My SIL's midwife told them that it was safe to stay home even though my SIL had pre-eclampsia, was in labor at 34 weeks, and was bleeding heavier than her normal period. The midwife said that my nephew "felt big" and that "labor would get him ready to breathe." She was quite wrong on both counts. He was 3 lbs. and did not breathe until the NICU team had worked on him for over five minutes. My SIL decided to transfer, which was *obviously* what the midwife should have recommended hours earlier. Home birth is NOT safe for all mother/baby pairs and it is vitally important to choose a midwife that understands this.

    5. If transport becomes necessary during a home birth, the resulting hospital birth is likely to be very medical. Since the reason for transporting is due to complications, those medical interventions would then be the safer alternative. When mothers are properly educated and supported they are better able to distinguish which option is safest for their particular situation and they are less like to experience birth trauma.

    6. A few hospitals in the US actually practice evidence-based care. In other words, the policy is to leave birth alone unless there is an actual problem. If you have access to this type of hospital, that may be safer than a home birth since you would only be dealing with the risks inherent to birth *and* you would still have direct access to emergency care.

    I am lucky enough to live near enough to a good hospital, which opened up two years ago. I am going to give birth there instead of at home because I find I don't trust my home birth community after my nephew's botched birth. I feel strongly that the home birth community at large should police ourselves because bad births affect our legal status, not to mention the devestated lives at the hands of incompetent midwives. If I didn't have this hospital, I would have another home birth because it would still be safer than going to one of the many other hospitals.

    Naval Gazing Midwife has a great series of questions to ask a home birth midwife. If my SIL had asked these questions, I think she would have been able to determine that the midwife she hired was not safe.

    http://navelgazingmidwife.squarespac...fe-part-1.html
    Laura
    Homeschooling mama of five dds and brand new ds!
    Our June baby arrived in May with the help of Hypnobabies.
    No circ for our little man: The Elephant in the Hospital

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    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
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    I see you're in California. You can check your midwife's status, or find someone in your area, here: http://www2.dca.ca.gov/pls/wllpub/wl..._pgm_code=6200

    A licensed midwife, at least one licensed in California, will NOT allow the kinds of things Winky described in #4 to happen, because it would jeopardize her licensure. Certain things (pre-eclampsia, significant vaginal bleeding, and labor before 37 weeks are all among them) require that the mother seek consultation with an OB, and transfer of care to an OB if they cannot be resolved.
    The number of U.S. states in which a person can marry the person they love regardless of gender: 30 and counting!

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    Prolific Poster Winky_the_HouseElf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    I see you're in California. You can check your midwife's status, or find someone in your area, here: http://www2.dca.ca.gov/pls/wllpub/wl..._pgm_code=6200

    A licensed midwife, at least one licensed in California, will NOT allow the kinds of things Winky described in #4 to happen, because it would jeopardize her licensure. Certain things (pre-eclampsia, significant vaginal bleeding, and labor before 37 weeks are all among them) require that the mother seek consultation with an OB, and transfer of care to an OB if they cannot be resolved.
    The licensure here in Utah prevents those things as well, but my SIL's licensed midwife stayed home with them anyway. She still has her license, too.
    Laura
    Homeschooling mama of five dds and brand new ds!
    Our June baby arrived in May with the help of Hypnobabies.
    No circ for our little man: The Elephant in the Hospital

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    Mega Poster krazykat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winky_the_HouseElf View Post
    4. If you are going to choose a home birth, it is so very important to choose a midwife who doesn't stay home with things that are not low-risk. Unfortunately, there is a growing number of midwives who take a cavalier, "trust birth" attitude toward what they call "variations of normal" that are actually complications. Case in point: My SIL's midwife told them that it was safe to stay home even though my SIL had pre-eclampsia, was in labor at 34 weeks, and was bleeding heavier than her normal period. The midwife said that my nephew "felt big" and that "labor would get him ready to breathe." She was quite wrong on both counts. He was 3 lbs. and did not breathe until the NICU team had worked on him for over five minutes. My SIL decided to transfer, which was *obviously* what the midwife should have recommended hours earlier. Home birth is NOT safe for all mother/baby pairs and it is vitally important to choose a midwife that understands this.
    http://navelgazingmidwife.squarespac...fe-part-1.html
    I could not agree with you more. I have especially seen this with licensed midwives and even CNMs who do homebirths. Interestingly, it seems like the lay midwives (in my own experience) follow the guidelines much more closely so as to not draw attention to themselves.

    Cavalier is not cool in my book, and it has really burnt me to using a midwife. Thank goodness I have a super duper, out of the ordinary, OB.
    Ariel & John: Military Family since May 17, 2006

    Sylvia: 12/18/08, Justus: 9/17/10, Bunni: 5/11/12, Surprise Baby: Guess Date 11/5/13



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