A Proven Method for Lowering the Cesarean Rate
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Thread: A Proven Method for Lowering the Cesarean Rate

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    Posting Addict Chimmy's Avatar
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    Default A Proven Method for Lowering the Cesarean Rate

    Yet another article in my local newspaper last week bemoaned the fact that the cesarean rate keeps rising and physicians are concerned not only about the high rate of surgery but also the future complications that increase after cesarean surgery. It’s a well-documented fact that a cesarean can adversely affect a woman’s health for the rest of her life and can lead to catastrophic complications in future births. That’s one reason why, 40 years ago, doctors did everything in their power to prevent that first cesarean from being done.

    What if there was a tried method of reducing the cesarean rate within hospitals? What if it involved some truly innovative thinking? What if it had a proven track record and had resulted in a significant drop in the rate of surgeries for first-time mothers? What if it saved money, recovery time for the patient, and better health for the babies? Would you think that method would be adopted all over North America right away? Yes, that would be a reasonable assumption. Unfortunately, this project was undertaken at B.C. Women’s Hospital, it was a success, and it was dropped once the project was complete with a resulting re-increase of the cesarean rate. No reason for discontinuing the project has ever been given but i will speculate at the end of this post.
    You can read the rest of the article here:
    http://www.glorialemay.com/blog/?p=164
    Mama to 7 curious, wild & wonderful little ones



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    Posting Addict renee24's Avatar
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    that is why I have such a big trust issue with OBs.
    Tiff + Bobby 8/22/04
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    Posting Addict jolly11sd's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing that article!
    ~Joy~ DS1-8/5/05, DS2-10/18/10 (VBAC#1), DS3- 4/11/12 (VBAC#2!)


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    I typed a long reply to this, but I thought better of it. I think the bottom line is more women need to educate themselves and take some responsibility for their births and for their babies' health. I knew when I was in labor with my first that if I wasn't actively dilating and in labor, I didn't need to be at the hospital. By the time most women I know hit 38 weeks, they are hoping for an induction. Some of them are uneducated. Some simply just don't care and want the baby out.
    So while I am not saying OBs are blameless (I feel they should be warning the patients more about the potential risks associated with interventions and refuse non-medically indicated inductions), I feel that most of the problem lies with the women who don't educate themselves and make informed decisions.
    But I also have had two amazing OBs and hopefully the one I am using now is as well, so I can't understand the OB conspiracy theories that many articles insinuate.
    Beth

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    Posting Addict mommys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by countrygirl83 View Post
    I typed a long reply to this, but I thought better of it. I think the bottom line is more women need to educate themselves and take some responsibility for their births and for their babies' health. I knew when I was in labor with my first that if I wasn't actively dilating and in labor, I didn't need to be at the hospital. By the time most women I know hit 38 weeks, they are hoping for an induction. Some of them are uneducated. Some simply just don't care and want the baby out.
    So while I am not saying OBs are blameless (I feel they should be warning the patients more about the potential risks associated with interventions and refuse non-medically indicated inductions), I feel that most of the problem lies with the women who don't educate themselves and make informed decisions.
    But I also have had two amazing OBs and hopefully the one I am using now is as well, so I can't understand the OB conspiracy theories that many articles insinuate.
    I agree. I'm amazed how little some women educate themselves.

    I do think the system (nurses and doctors) promotes the current system though. If women who were uneducated were put into a system similar to this trial, there would be less c/s than these same women entering our current system. We want our practitioners to know what they are doing and do their best for us, but I feel many of them are not living up to this expectation.
    Stephanie & Dave - Andrea 10/22/06, Natalie 6/24/11
    8/26/10 at 13W




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    Very true. The entire system is set up for inductions, early admissions, etc. I would definitely become a legality issue to refuse to give women epidurals before 8 cms, etc. But if the system was designed so that those type of things were encouraged and women were better informed, it would probably make a huge difference.
    Beth

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    Posting Addict Chimmy's Avatar
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    Education absolutley is a key ingredient to seeing change but it's not just the women who need to be educated in order to create that change. An example - tonight I am very sad for a friend of mine. She just delivered her 9th child, she has had 5 homebirths & tonight due to the ignorance of a nurse & the vulnerable place that my friend was in, she is recovering from a c-section. My friend knows birth, she is smart & educated & has had a footling breech birth at home - yet here she is recovering from a c-section. They broke her waters without checking the position of the baby, upon further inspection it was discovered that she was transverse & did not turn & had no chance of turning because the waters were already broken. It's heartbreaking to me, but I understand where she was emotionally because I've been there myself. Women who are in labor, who have had difficult or emotional pregnancies are not often in a postion to advocate for themselves - even smart, educated women like my friend. So you see educating the women is only part of the solution. Change & education need to be done within our hospitals as well, our part in that is demanding those changes & until we do on a very wide, very open scale things will not shift.

    Another example. I have seen OB after OB out right lie to mom's - sometimes over such simple things like cutting the cord & when the mom balks about it being too soon (which it was) their immediate response is "I felt the cord, it wasn't pulsing anymore". I would love to reply "Really? Because the size and the color of the cord do not reflect one that is done pulsing." Of course I don't say this, but it frustrates me to see such a blatant disregard over such a simple request. So yes, I do agree that education is big but disagree with your wording in regards to OB conspiracy - I feel wording it like that undermines a very real issue going on within our birthing community.

    A quote from the article that I found to be very interesting.

    Emily says:
    March 28, 2011 at 9:22 pm
    This isn’t the first time this has happened. In 1847, Semmelweis demonstrated his theory of hand-washing to reduce cases of puerperal fever, and managed to reduce the maternal mortality rate to less than 1% within months. Some notice was taken, but he was largely ignored and the method ridiculed. It wasn’t until 20 years later, when Pasteur proved the existence of germs, that anyone even *began* to entertain Semmelweis’ treatment. Even then, while aseptic routine was introduced, the majority of doctors still refused to wash their hands, out of pride. The maternal mortality really only began to sharply decline in hospitals in the 1940s, when antibiotics were discovered and able to be used to treat the fever, not because they had started to wash their hands! That’s a full 100 years after it was demonstrated that hand-washing reduced maternal mortality. So yeah, I don’t think doctors are any more inclined to change their ways than they were 150 years ago.
    Mama to 7 curious, wild & wonderful little ones



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