Ripple Effect seen from rising C/S in FTMs.

15 posts / 0 new
Last post
TyrantOfTheWeek's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 4 months ago
Joined: 12/26/05
Posts: 1147
Ripple Effect seen from rising C/S in FTMs.
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 6 days ago
Joined: 12/10/05
Posts: 1681

Wow. Those stats are terrible!

TiggersMommy's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 8 months ago
Joined: 02/14/10
Posts: 6043

The article suggests that women need to be better educated. What about educating our doctors better! Women most certainly need education outside of "how to be a good patient." But seriously, we should be able to TRUST that our doctors are doing what's best for us and our babies. They aren't even following ACOG recommendations, which I feel err on the side of self-serving conservatism. If more women were better educated, it wouldn't be so easy for doctors to perform C-sections without even the slightest bit of questioning. Oh, your baby is breech ... C-section. Your baby is too big .... C-section. Your pelvis is too small .... C-section. You're not progressing and I've got a golf game ..... C-section. I had a golf game last time so you had a C-section ..... C-section.

cmljll's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 11/28/06
Posts: 1409

A lot of the problem is the doctor's fear of being sued. Hospital regulations also play a big part, as do laws governing midwives, birth centers, etc.

TiggersMommy's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 8 months ago
Joined: 02/14/10
Posts: 6043

But since C-sections are more likely to cause complications you'd think doctors would want to avoid them so as to avoid getting sued. Their best tool to avoid getting sued is making the patient feel like if they hadn't stepped in the outcome would have been worse.

If birth were billed as a package deal regardless of how it turned out, I bet the C/S rate would drop.

faeriecurls's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 1 month ago
Joined: 06/04/08
Posts: 790

"Preggo_in_Tucson" wrote:

The article suggests that women need to be better educated. What about educating our doctors better! Women most certainly need education outside of "how to be a good patient." But seriously, we should be able to TRUST that our doctors are doing what's best for us and our babies. They aren't even following ACOG recommendations, which I feel err on the side of self-serving conservatism. If more women were better educated, it wouldn't be so easy for doctors to perform C-sections without even the slightest bit of questioning. Oh, your baby is breech ... C-section. Your baby is too big .... C-section. Your pelvis is too small .... C-section. You're not progressing and I've got a golf game ..... C-section. I had a golf game last time so you had a C-section ..... C-section.

This!!

momW's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 5 months ago
Joined: 09/29/09
Posts: 5634

"Preggo_in_Tucson" wrote:

But since C-sections are more likely to cause complications you'd think doctors would want to avoid them so as to avoid getting sued. Their best tool to avoid getting sued is making the patient feel like if they hadn't stepped in the outcome would have been worse.

If birth were billed as a package deal regardless of how it turned out, I bet the C/S rate would drop.

It seems logical, but by the time a FTM has her c-section the dr has her so convinced that they "saved" the baby's life that most don't question it. A c/s is still seen by most that aren't educated enough as a "life-saving" method and one their dr would only do if absolutely necessary, which isn't the case most times. So, the mom ends up thanking her dr for his heroics and singing his praises after the birth for his quick action.

The entire profession of Obstetrics needs a major overhaul in order for the c/s rate to even start decreasing, from policy to procedure.

Mom2ThreeKiddos's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 5 months ago
Joined: 09/15/09
Posts: 1380

"cmljll" wrote:

A lot of the problem is the doctor's fear of being sued. Hospital regulations also play a big part, as do laws governing midwives, birth centers, etc.

Yep and a lot of doctors give up on doing vbacs at all because of hospital policy. My 3rd c-section was for no other reason other than my doctor not wanting to babysit me due to hospital policy. I went into labor on my own at 36w.

ACOG just revised their guidlines and I really hope that this does something to loosen the regulations set by hospitals. I really hope doctors actually read the new guidelines and are more open to them.

Most people belive what their doctor tells them. They don't really research it for themselves. Sigh!

Mom2ThreeKiddos's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 5 months ago
Joined: 09/15/09
Posts: 1380

"Preggo_in_Tucson" wrote:

The article suggests that women need to be better educated. What about educating our doctors better! Women most certainly need education outside of "how to be a good patient." But seriously, we should be able to TRUST that our doctors are doing what's best for us and our babies. They aren't even following ACOG recommendations, which I feel err on the side of self-serving conservatism. If more women were better educated, it wouldn't be so easy for doctors to perform C-sections without even the slightest bit of questioning. Oh, your baby is breech ... C-section. Your baby is too big .... C-section. Your pelvis is too small .... C-section. You're not progressing and I've got a golf game ..... C-section. I had a golf game last time so you had a C-section ..... C-section.

ACOG just very recently changed it VBAC guidelines. Let's hope that doctors start following.

Offline
Last seen: 4 years 6 days ago
Joined: 12/10/05
Posts: 1681

With the ACOG changes, let hope the courts will back doctors who follow the guidelines, and litigation will stop being a reason for jumping too quickly to a c/s.

Offline
Last seen: 3 years 9 months ago
Joined: 01/22/07
Posts: 170

Also the fact that people run around trying to scare moms that want a VBAC doesn't help.

I have had an RN tell me I am putting my baby at risk and I am a bad mom for attempted a VBAC.

Awesome.

Amber_daisy's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 years 3 months ago
Joined: 10/17/06
Posts: 567

Guidelines be damned. Maternity care providers need to practice evidence based medicine. Period. That needs to happen, and true informed consent needs to happen. Only then will this defensive medicine crap stop (or at least lessen).

MrsMangoBabe's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 years 5 months ago
Joined: 04/09/07
Posts: 2276

Unfortunately doctors don't get faulted in court for doing a c-section. The malpractice cases that actually make lawyers money all involve harm to the baby. In court, the more a doctor "did" to "save" a baby, the better the doctor looks. Doctors are much more likely to be sued for not doing a c-section than for doing one, especially since you can't really know for sure if a particular c-section was necessary or not (see http://academicobgyn.com/2010/07/27/the-myth-of-the-unnecessary-cesarean/)

momW's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 5 months ago
Joined: 09/29/09
Posts: 5634

"MrsMangoBabe" wrote:

Unfortunately doctors don't get faulted in court for doing a c-section. The malpractice cases that actually make lawyers money all involve harm to the baby. In court, the more a doctor "did" to "save" a baby, the better the doctor looks. Doctors are much more likely to be sued for not doing a c-section than for doing one, especially since you can't really know for sure if a particular c-section was necessary or not (see http://academicobgyn.com/2010/07/27/the-myth-of-the-unnecessary-cesarean/)

Unfortunate, but very true!!!

Mom2ThreeKiddos's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 5 months ago
Joined: 09/15/09
Posts: 1380

The fact that hospitals are scared into do c-sections when the risk of vbac is so low. The rupture rate after one c-section is like 0.9% - 1.9%. The problem is that having a c-section itself is major surgery and carriers risks all to itelf and possible problems in future pregnancies.