Is the way we birth causing breastfeeding failure?
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Thread: Is the way we birth causing breastfeeding failure?

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    Posting Addict momW's Avatar
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    Default Is the way we birth causing breastfeeding failure?

    Is the way we birth causing breastfeeding failure?

    Anyone read this article yet? Any thoughts?

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    Posting Addict alwayssmile's Avatar
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    My thought is that I'm going to share this.

    I had a very medicalized birth with Aiden and I can easily see how this could affect a less determined mom and baby.

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    Posting Addict tink9702's Avatar
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    Interesting article. Though I do believe interventions, drugs etc. have a big part in it, I want to throw in my 2 cents regarding my son.

    I had an unmedicated birth with him, but it was fast, exhausting and scary at the end because of deceling heart-rate. This left me very unprepared for BFing after. I ended up pumping exclusively for 4 months. My DD on the other hand had a fast birth, but it was much less exhausting and no drama at the end either. She and I established a great BF relationship that is still going after 1 year. Basically I'm saying that it's not always about the medical side - sometimes it's more psychological. I don't think I was supported & encouraged enough to BF in the hospital and my DH didn't want to push me. In hindsight I wish he had pushed me more, maybe I'd feel better about DS and not BF him. I also think there is another component about mom's who will be going back to work that drastically can change the BF relationsihp - you have to introduce a bottle because of this and it's a rough transition sometimes.

    anyway, just wanted to post because it's not the whole story, not my story anyway!
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    Posting Addict Lots-o-Tots's Avatar
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    Yep, makes a whole lotta sense.
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    Posting Addict jolly11sd's Avatar
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    Good article. I can totally see that. I feel like a few of the issues I had with initally with DS1 were due to that.
    I also see Mel's point that other factors can have an effect as well.
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    Posting Addict boilermaker's Avatar
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    Makes sense to me.

    I also recall reading that when moms are pumped full of fluids prior to an epidural that some of that "fluid" adds to the weight of the baby and then the hospitals suggest that baby has lost too much weight post-birth and needs to supplement w formula-- even though it was an artificially inflated weight.....
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    Mega Poster knhoward's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boilermaker View Post
    Makes sense to me.

    I also recall reading that when moms are pumped full of fluids prior to an epidural that some of that "fluid" adds to the weight of the baby and then the hospitals suggest that baby has lost too much weight post-birth and needs to supplement w formula-- even though it was an artificially inflated weight.....
    This is exactly what happened to me with my DS1. I had an extremely long labour and had IV fluids for 12 hours or so. DSs weight was so inflated at the start that he lost 13% of his body weight, then I was forced to supplement him, setting off a whole host of other problems. I wish I had know back then what I know now.
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    Posting Addict Starryblue702's Avatar
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    Very good article with a lot of good points! I just had my fourth baby and BF him is much easier than with any of my other babies. I had all of them in a hospital, and three of them with epis (all vag deliveries, too!). With the first three I'll admit it was partly my fault, as I never really eduacated myself on the importance of BF and gave up very quickly due to pain, poor latching, and other things. With this baby I was determined to do whatever it takes to BF this baby for at least a year, and am slowly but surely on my journey to doing just that!
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    Quote Originally Posted by tink9702 View Post
    Basically I'm saying that it's not always about the medical side - sometimes it's more psychological.
    I totally agree! I think it can go either way, depending on the mom and the delivery. I had a peaceful relaxing epidural birth with my first with a dose of fentanyl prior to the epi. It was truly all rainbows and butterflies. He was born, immediately skin to skin, and nursing within minutes. I felt like I was in heaven with my new baby. I had a natural delivery with my second and was a total wreck for hours after the birth. I'm guessing I didn't handle well that "adrenaline rush" afterwards. I had a harder time getting over the birth than getting through the actual birth. I felt so overwhelmed I was grateful when they took the baby. With my first we did vitals, agpars, everything else right on my belly. With my second I was very willing to hand him over! I didnt nurse him till several hours later, I was just way too shakey and jittery. I didn't even do skin to skin with him.

    Ultimately for me it didn't matter because I am very determined to breastfeed and can't imagine anything else, but I can certainly see how psychologically it could make a huge difference for some mothers. I was the total opposite of what this article describes, yet I have to say I agree with it very much... although you have to consider the emotional and mental aspect of what makes a woman stick with breastfeeding or even whether she tries at all.
    Baby #3 due July 6 2013

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    This article makes a lot of sense. I have been questioning why it is so hard for women to BF. Most of the women I know have BF, and their advice has always been don't give up, it's hard at first, but it gets easier and it's worth it. There are a few women I know who say formula is the only way to go. And the biggest mistake new moms make is not giving formula, because they are starving (Yes - starving) their child.

    My Mom BF all 6 of her kids and has been giving me tips and such and i have been reading as much as I can about BFing and how to make it easier and why there may be problems. More conversations need to be done on the how, when and why. When I told my DH that baby feeds 8 - 12 times a day, He thought he misheard me. We've had many talks about breast feeding and we are both 100% that breast is best. I will also pump so he can feed baby too.
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