WIN!

11 posts / 0 new
Last post
TyrantOfTheWeek's picture
Joined: 12/26/05
Posts: 1147
WIN!
krazykat's picture
Joined: 08/11/07
Posts: 1143

I really hope this catches on with the other states! Great article!

mandi04's picture
Joined: 08/10/03
Posts: 2272

It's a good idea but I am SO sick and tired of the government trying to micromanage health care decisions that should be between the patient and their doctor.
If we want things like this we should look at the medical board, who should be/could be punishing drs who are inducing for no medical reason. If a dr worries their license is at stake they wouldn't be so likely.

momW's picture
Joined: 09/29/09
Posts: 5634

hmmm....I'm gonna have to disagree that this is a good thing. I think a lot of times it starts with inductions, but there is still so much messed up with maternity care and this is not just going to fix it. Focus on things like education. Listen to the women who have BTDT, got screwed, got educated and are fighting for things like the right to deliver with a midwife. If the government wants to fight a battle for safer deliveries and healthier babies, maybe they should stop fighting so hard against midwives.

This is one of those band-aid type fixes. You put a band-aid on a gushing artery, sure it's gonna soak up some of the mess but there still needs to be something more done to fix it.

Doesn't the government have enough things they are already micromanaging anyway.

jooniper's picture
Joined: 08/27/07
Posts: 780

IF it were simply a matter of the experience/health of the mother/child, than I'd say the govt needs to stay out of it. However, elective inductions (And the ensuing complications) have financial implications that go far beyond the mother, which is why I don't mind a little gov't regulation. That and the healthcare industry has proven that it completely fails at regulating itself. Ideally society and mothers would take charge and fix it themselves, but... don't see that happening on a grand scale.

ETA: I also agree there should be higher priorities than this particular fix, but hey, it's a start.

DunyaWolf's picture
Joined: 07/25/08
Posts: 223

I saw this, and I think the title is a little misleading. If you go to the actual article, its not so much about making elective inductions "illegal"- its about the putting in place a policy to reduce elective inductions funded by the state.

Mindful of research showing health problems with babies delivered early, the state Department of Human Services has proposed that hospitals create plans by 2012 for reducing elective inductions prior to 39 weeks gestation. The penalty for those without plans? Fill out onerous paperwork for every state-funded delivery.

And it seems like the "penalty" would be increased paperwork :confused:

And my issue with it, even though I totally agree with where they are coming from (both in reducing unnecessary inductions and with the state paying for unnecessary procedures like this) is a) that I don't agree with the government stepping in and making laws about what one chooses to do with her body, and b) most importantly, how exactly are they going to define "medically necessary?" Some cases are obvious- like, mom is sick of being pregnant and pressures her doctor to induce her as soon as she's 37 weeks. But other peoples' cases can really blur the lines. I think its such a case by case basis as to whether someone's induction was truly neccesary that it would be impossible to enforce effectively. And there would still be a lot of wiggle room for doctors and mothers who wanted to get around it- I am SURE a doctor could come up with a "medical reason" if he had to, kwim?

momW's picture
Joined: 09/29/09
Posts: 5634

"DunyaWolf" wrote:

And my issue with it, even though I totally agree with where they are coming from (both in reducing unnecessary inductions and with the state paying for unnecessary procedures like this) is a) that I don't agree with the government stepping in and making laws about what one chooses to do with her body, and b) most importantly, how exactly are they going to define "medically necessary?" Some cases are obvious- like, mom is sick of being pregnant and pressures her doctor to induce her as soon as she's 37 weeks. But other peoples' cases can really blur the lines. I think its such a case by case basis as to whether someone's induction was truly neccesary that it would be impossible to enforce effectively. And there would still be a lot of wiggle room for doctors and mothers who wanted to get around it- I am SURE a doctor could come up with a "medical reason" if he had to, kwim?

THIS! I completely agree.

My BFF was begging her dr by the time she was 36 weeks to induce as soon as possible. Our hospital has a policy against inductions that are not medically indicated. Her dr found out that she was going to have eye surgery and it would conflict with my friends "due date". So, guess what, around 37 weeks the dr started to get "concerned" that the baby was getting too big. 38 week induction, Granted!! Both the mom and the dr had an agenda and they got around the policies.

Same friend, same hospital, same policies, 4 years ago. She got a different dr to induce her at 38 weeks because the baby was measuring big. Her husband was leaving town for a rodeo just before her due date and she wanted to be able to go with him.

TyrantOfTheWeek's picture
Joined: 12/26/05
Posts: 1147

Or maybe they could have a policy that at least 2 doctors have to agree as to the reason to the induction? Like a mandatory second opinion. Maybe from a doctor that is NOT in the same practice. Just pulling at straws here.

momW's picture
Joined: 09/29/09
Posts: 5634

I'm going way out in left field here, but the problem with our maternity system is not just early inductions. There are a s@#$ ton more problems than just that. Because this problem so obviously affects babies the March of Dimes is involved and it gets media attention. The government will get involved, they will make a policy, said policy will barely get noticed in passing as OB's continue on their destructive path toward 100% c/s rates. In 50 years they will have women so convinced that our bodies don't work properly they will be wheeling every single pregnant woman in for surgery at 38 weeks. We will be saved from ourselves by OB's!!! Three cheers for Dr. Slicenstitch, hip hip hooray!!!! Okay, that was pretty snarky, sorry (I have a house full of sick people and I'm trying to hold onto my sanity, sarcasm does that for me).

I still stand by my opinion that this is too big of a problem for one little policy to fix. What about the research that shows that babies delivered via c/s have more respiratory problems than babies born vaginally? What about the research showing that continual EFM only leads to higher c/s rates and does nothing to "save" babies on a statistically significant basis? And c/s's lead to higher infant and mother morbidity rates? The government will seemingly get up in arms about this and there will be something put in place to reduce induction rates and in 2 years no one will even remember what it was they had said originally. Remind you of the Healthy People 2010 policies that were put in place! Everyone chanted lower c/s rates, increase breastfeeding rates!!! Guess what has been done....uh, not much!

I could go off on a tangent all day long about the problems with the Healthy People 2010 campaign and the governments lack of follow through!

TyrantOfTheWeek's picture
Joined: 12/26/05
Posts: 1147

"momW" wrote:

I'm going way out in left field here, but the problem with our maternity system is not just early inductions. There are a s@#$ ton more problems than just that.

Okay, that was pretty snarky, sorry (I have a house full of sick people and I'm trying to hold onto my sanity, sarcasm does that for me).

I still stand by my opinion that this is too big of a problem for one little policy to fix.

I could go off on a tangent all day long about the problems with the Healthy People 2010 campaign and the governments lack of follow through!

Yes
Yes
Yes
and Yes.

MrsMangoBabe's picture
Joined: 04/09/07
Posts: 2276

While I think that reducing elective inductions is a good goal, I agree with others that this doesn't sound like a good way to do it. I believe medical decision making power should be primarily in the hands of the patient. I also think finding a way to incentivize doctors for using less intervention would help, too, because right now there is not a lot of motivation to do spontaneous vaginal deliveries.