11 YO makes hockey shot
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    Default 11 YO makes hockey shot

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/...20092406.shtml

    I found this story interesting. Nick, an 11 YO boy bought a raffle ticket for $10 to take a hockey shot for $50,000. His name was called. Nate, his identical twin brother took the shot instead (Nick was outside when his name was called). He made the shot!

    The next day his father called and said the twins pulled the old switch-a-roo. Thus, the insurance company is reviewing the payout of the money.

    So what do you think? I don't know how the publicity would play out if they paid it out. That wouldn't be "fair" in the terms of the contest, I'm sure. I would not be surprised if the deny the prize but the general public donates some money to them instead.

    I'm a bit undecided. Because on one hand, I admire their honesty. On the other hand, there would no need for the dad to notify the charity who held the raffle if his son had been honest.

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    I'm glad they were honest and I doubt the insurance will pay out. I bet when he went down there they didn't think he'd actually make it so it was more of a have fun kind of thing than trying to be dishonest. I feel bad for the boys, but I don't think they should get the money.

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    I fail to see how brother making the shot vs. the other brother making the shot should affect the payout. The deal was, you make the shot, you get the money, and one of them did it. It's not like some professional hockey player went out there when Nick's name was called & he didn't show up. What a bunch of greedy shmucks.

    Actually, I'd venture to say that since a minor child can't enter a legally binding contract, the child's parent should be considered the one who bought the ticket & should be the one who will receive the money, and he's the parent of both kids, so it doesn't really matter.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    I fail to see how brother making the shot vs. the other brother making the shot should affect the payout. The deal was, you make the shot, you get the money, and one of them did it. It's not like some professional hockey player went out there when Nick's name was called & he didn't show up. What a bunch of greedy shmucks.

    Actually, I'd venture to say that since a minor child can't enter a legally binding contract, the child's parent should be considered the one who bought the ticket & should be the one who will receive the money, and he's the parent of both kids, so it doesn't really matter.
    Yep, I go wth this one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    I fail to see how brother making the shot vs. the other brother making the shot should affect the payout. The deal was, you make the shot, you get the money, and one of them did it. It's not like some professional hockey player went out there when Nick's name was called & he didn't show up. What a bunch of greedy shmucks.

    Actually, I'd venture to say that since a minor child can't enter a legally binding contract, the child's parent should be considered the one who bought the ticket & should be the one who will receive the money, and he's the parent of both kids, so it doesn't really matter.
    That's interesting. I wonder if they had to put their ages down on the raffle tickets. If the child can't enter into a contract, he wouldn't be eligible to even make the shot let alone collect the prize. IOW, when the promoters saw the boy, they should have told him his dad needed to take the shot.

    I think it is awesome that an 11 YO could make that shot! I'm sure he will have a long hockey career in front of him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ethanwinfield View Post
    That's interesting. I wonder if they had to put their ages down on the raffle tickets. If the child can't enter into a contract, he wouldn't be eligible to even make the shot let alone collect the prize. IOW, when the promoters saw the boy, they should have told him his dad needed to take the shot.
    Parents act on behalf of their kids all the time legally when the intention is to let the kid perform the act. Signing up for soccer or Girl Scouts, the kid is the one performing the act, but the parent is the one shouldering the responsibility. When a child is in a car accident, the insurance payout is made to the parent. And in church bingo games when I was a kid, the parents had to buy the card & collect the money, but the kids were the ones playing most of the cards.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    Parents act on behalf of their kids all the time legally when the intention is to let the kid perform the act. Signing up for soccer or Girl Scouts, the kid is the one performing the act, but the parent is the one shouldering the responsibility. When a child is in a car accident, the insurance payout is made to the parent. And in church bingo games when I was a kid, the parents had to buy the card & collect the money, but the kids were the ones playing most of the cards.
    But in all of the situations you describe the parent is the one entering into the agreement - signing contracts, paying money, etc. Parents have the right to act legally on their kid's behalf as long as it's not breaking some kind of law (like buying your kid booze while they're under age). It doesn't matter if a kid puts his name on a raffle ticket or pays money to enter a competition - unless one of the parents was there to consent in writing to the kid entering the raffle, there's no contract.
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    Good point. He entered into the contract for Nick but not Nate. So is there a contract there?

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    I absolutely commend the father for being honest. IMO that was the right thing to do and even if it is decided not to award the prize money (which the insurance company is well within their rights to do), I think it is a good lesson for his children in honesty. Far better to be upfront about it than claim the prize, only to be found out later and have it taken away.

    According to this article, they bought 3 tickets but put the other boy's name on all 3 because they thought he had a better chance at it.
    According to reports, the three decided that Nick had the best chance at making the shot since Nate had recently had a cast removed from his arm and was out of practice.

    But Nick left the game early, telling his brother to take the shot for him if his ticket got pulled.

    He did just that. Wearing shorts and flip-flops, Nate squared up and sent a long, fluttering wrist shot 89 feet down the ice, and directly into the netting.

    "I know how to shoot and stuff, so I lined it up, and yeah...," he told CNN.

    When the crowd exploded with excitement over the win, Pat said he went along with it. But later guilt started to get to him and he decided to own up to what had happened.

    "I just felt I had to do the right thing," he told ABCNews.

    "I just think that honesty is more important than any prize or money you could get."
    ITA with the bolded and have a lot more respect for the father for doing this than if he just kept his mouth shut.

    As for whether or not a child was eligible, I would think that by now they would've said he wasn't if that was the case. And if that was the case, there wouldn't be much of a story nor would there be a decision to be made whether or not the prize money can/should be awarded.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Princess&ThePea View Post
    I absolutely commend the father for being honest. IMO that was the right thing to do and even if it is decided not to award the prize money (which the insurance company is well within their rights to do), I think it is a good lesson for his children in honesty. Far better to be upfront about it than claim the prize, only to be found out later and have it taken away.

    According to this article, they bought 3 tickets but put the other boy's name on all 3 because they thought he had a better chance at it.

    ITA with the bolded and have a lot more respect for the father for doing this than if he just kept his mouth shut.

    As for whether or not a child was eligible, I would think that by now they would've said he wasn't if that was the case. And if that was the case, there wouldn't be much of a story nor would there be a decision to be made whether or not the prize money can/should be awarded.
    I agree, but I am still looking at the flip side that the honesty on the dad's part wouldn't have been necessary had his boys not been dishonest.

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