Abercrombie doesn't want large shoppers.
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Thread: Abercrombie doesn't want large shoppers.

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    Default Abercrombie doesn't want large shoppers.

    Abercrombie & Fitch ?doesn't stock XL or XXL sizes in women's clothing because they don't want overweight women wearing their brand,? says Business Insider. Apparently, the article emphasizes, the brand doesn?t consider ?plus-sized? teens to be part of the ?cool kid? crowd that they so long to attract.
    "He doesn't want larger people shopping in his store, he wants thin and beautiful people," Robin Lewis, co-author of The New Rules of Retail, told Business Insider about Abercrombie CEO Mike Jeffries. "He doesn't want his core customers to see people who aren't as hot as them wearing his clothing. People who wear his clothing should feel like they're one of the 'cool kids.'"
    A write-up for Salon in 2006 notws that at Abercrombie, ?if looks could kill, everyone here would be dead.? Apparently, that?s the whole idea behind Jeffries? marketing scheme. The very core of his strategy is that exceptionally cool, sexy, and exclusive simply sells.
    Jeffries said he thinks that including everyone would make his business ?boring,? writes Business Insider. In the meantime, the article explains, ?plus-sized is no longer a niche market: 67 percent of the apparel purchasing population fit that label, and the number is growing all the time.? In that regard, American Eagle and H&M, two of Abercrombie?s biggest competitors, stock much larger sizes: H&M carries pants up to size 16, and American Eagle up to size 18. H&M even recently featured a plus-sized model in its latest swimwear collection. The largest size Abercrombie carries for women? Size 10.
    ?In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids,? Jeffries told the site. ?Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of people don?t belong [in our clothes], and they can?t belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely."
    One wonders, will Abercrombie go under as the classic concept of beauty evolves into portraying more realistic bodies? According to Jeffries, his business model is based on 100% natural selection.
    Thoughts? Would you allow your child to buy their clothes? Would you boycott their brand?

  2. #2
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    I saw this last night and thought about posting it.

    I already do not shop Abercrombie for other reasons. If I did, I would stop immediately. I would not allow my child to wear clothing that said Abercrombie for a variety of reasons.

    I do not care what other people wear or let their children wear.

    ~Bonita~

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    Like Bonita I don't shop there and I haven't shopped there since I was 18-19.

    I think his attitude is disgusting (and if you've seen a pic of him I'm not sure he's anyone who could speak to about beauty). I had commented on someone's post last night that even back at 18-19 when I wore a size 6-8 pant I had a hard time fitting into their shirts because of my breast size. It had nothing to do with my weight.

    His view is narrow minded. His clothing looks like it was made by 4 year olds (probably was in a sweatshop) their stores smell and they play horrible music and way too loud (not because I'm in my 30s. I have always hated it)

    Since I don't shop there I can't really boycott the way I would want but I wouldn't consider frequenting his store now.
    Mom to Elizabeth (6) and Corinne (4)

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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    Would never buy anything there. This isn't the first time they have been called out. I'm not really sure why anyone would buy clothes from a company when their advertising is more about having the clothes off than on.

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    Abercrombie & Fitch have always marketed toward a certain group of people. I don't see it as something to be upset about (no one complains about Lane Bryant only catering to plus size women, ya know?) and they fully have the right to continue selling to a select set of people. I don't personally shop there, and can't see myself doing so in the future, so to me it isn't a big deal. If my son were to ask to shop there I wouldn't be bothered by it.

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    It actually made my stomach hurt when I read this. Of course I don't shop there as I'm an adult, but I would never buy their clothing for my kids as they got older. I find his comments disgusting ~ teens are self conscious enough ~ and this is just intentionally classist and hurtful and gross. I would not allow my children to wear clothing which purposely fed into such a mean spirited intention. We will stick to brands which cater to everyone.

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    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athena4 View Post
    Abercrombie & Fitch have always marketed toward a certain group of people. I don't see it as something to be upset about (no one complains about Lane Bryant only catering to plus size women, ya know?) and they fully have the right to continue selling to a select set of people. I don't personally shop there, and can't see myself doing so in the future, so to me it isn't a big deal. If my son were to ask to shop there I wouldn't be bothered by it.
    Yeah but if you were to look at what the explanation for a store like Lane Bryant would be, compared to his reasons for not wanting fat people, i think one would be offensive, and one would not. He is essentially saying fat people and ugly people ruin his brand because they are unappealing. I think Lane Bryants goals it to fill a niche market, not that skinny people are repulsive and would ruin their success.
    mommytoMR.FACE likes this.

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    ITA with Melis, I try to avoid companies that are blatantly classist, hurtful, and mean-spirited. (My kids actually sing, "Walmart is eeeevil, Walmart is eeeevil," whenever we see one on the side of the freeway. ) Obviously, I share my POV with my children so if one of them were to want to shop there, we'd have a talk about it. They wouldn't be using my money to do it, though.
    The number of U.S. states in which a person can marry the person they love regardless of gender: 30 and counting!

  9. #9
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    Ok, I can see that. I just think if he wants to be a complete a## and be offensive, then that's his right. At this point my son is too young to request one brand of clothes over another. Perhaps when he's older it'll be a different ball game, but I can't see telling him "No, you can't have that shirt, because the guy that runs the company is a douche bag."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Athena4 View Post
    Ok, I can see that. I just think if he wants to be a complete a## and be offensive, then that's his right. At this point my son is too young to request one brand of clothes over another. Perhaps when he's older it'll be a different ball game, but I can't see telling him "No, you can't have that shirt, because the guy that runs the company is a douche bag."
    I don't think it should be illegal to have such a store obviously, but it is not a place I would shop. He has the right to be a jerk, and I have the right to not spend my money there.

    ~Bonita~

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