Abercrombie doesn't want large shoppers.

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Abercrombie doesn't want large shoppers.

Abercrombie & Fitch ?doesn't stock XL or XXL sizes in women's clothing because they don't want overweight women wearing their brand,? says Business Insider. Apparently, the article emphasizes, the brand doesn?t consider ?plus-sized? teens to be part of the ?cool kid? crowd that they so long to attract.
"He doesn't want larger people shopping in his store, he wants thin and beautiful people," Robin Lewis, co-author of The New Rules of Retail, told Business Insider about Abercrombie CEO Mike Jeffries. "He doesn't want his core customers to see people who aren't as hot as them wearing his clothing. People who wear his clothing should feel like they're one of the 'cool kids.'"
A write-up for Salon in 2006 notws that at Abercrombie, ?if looks could kill, everyone here would be dead.? Apparently, that?s the whole idea behind Jeffries? marketing scheme. The very core of his strategy is that exceptionally cool, sexy, and exclusive simply sells.
Jeffries said he thinks that including everyone would make his business ?boring,? writes Business Insider. In the meantime, the article explains, ?plus-sized is no longer a niche market: 67 percent of the apparel purchasing population fit that label, and the number is growing all the time.? In that regard, American Eagle and H&M, two of Abercrombie?s biggest competitors, stock much larger sizes: H&M carries pants up to size 16, and American Eagle up to size 18. H&M even recently featured a plus-sized model in its latest swimwear collection. The largest size Abercrombie carries for women? Size 10.
?In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids,? Jeffries told the site. ?Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of people don?t belong [in our clothes], and they can?t belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely."
One wonders, will Abercrombie go under as the classic concept of beauty evolves into portraying more realistic bodies? According to Jeffries, his business model is based on 100% natural selection.

Thoughts? Would you allow your child to buy their clothes? Would you boycott their brand?

AlyssaEimers's picture
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I saw this last night and thought about posting it.

I already do not shop Abercrombie for other reasons. If I did, I would stop immediately. I would not allow my child to wear clothing that said Abercrombie for a variety of reasons.

I do not care what other people wear or let their children wear.

Joined: 08/17/04
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Like Bonita I don't shop there and I haven't shopped there since I was 18-19.

I think his attitude is disgusting (and if you've seen a pic of him I'm not sure he's anyone who could speak to about beauty). I had commented on someone's post last night that even back at 18-19 when I wore a size 6-8 pant I had a hard time fitting into their shirts because of my breast size. It had nothing to do with my weight.

His view is narrow minded. His clothing looks like it was made by 4 year olds (probably was in a sweatshop) their stores smell and they play horrible music and way too loud (not because I'm in my 30s. I have always hated it)

Since I don't shop there I can't really boycott the way I would want but I wouldn't consider frequenting his store now.

GloriaInTX's picture
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Would never buy anything there. This isn't the first time they have been called out. I'm not really sure why anyone would buy clothes from a company when their advertising is more about having the clothes off than on.

snopes.com: Abercrombie & Fitch 'Christmas Field Guide' Nudity
Oh No They Didn't! - Abercrombie & Fitch brings back racy catalog

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Abercrombie & Fitch have always marketed toward a certain group of people. I don't see it as something to be upset about (no one complains about Lane Bryant only catering to plus size women, ya know?) and they fully have the right to continue selling to a select set of people. I don't personally shop there, and can't see myself doing so in the future, so to me it isn't a big deal. If my son were to ask to shop there I wouldn't be bothered by it.

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It actually made my stomach hurt when I read this. Of course I don't shop there as I'm an adult, but I would never buy their clothing for my kids as they got older. I find his comments disgusting ~ teens are self conscious enough ~ and this is just intentionally classist and hurtful and gross. I would not allow my children to wear clothing which purposely fed into such a mean spirited intention. We will stick to brands which cater to everyone.

KimPossible's picture
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"Athena4" wrote:

Abercrombie & Fitch have always marketed toward a certain group of people. I don't see it as something to be upset about (no one complains about Lane Bryant only catering to plus size women, ya know?) and they fully have the right to continue selling to a select set of people. I don't personally shop there, and can't see myself doing so in the future, so to me it isn't a big deal. If my son were to ask to shop there I wouldn't be bothered by it.

Yeah but if you were to look at what the explanation for a store like Lane Bryant would be, compared to his reasons for not wanting fat people, i think one would be offensive, and one would not. He is essentially saying fat people and ugly people ruin his brand because they are unappealing. I think Lane Bryants goals it to fill a niche market, not that skinny people are repulsive and would ruin their success.

Spacers's picture
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ITA with Melis, I try to avoid companies that are blatantly classist, hurtful, and mean-spirited. (My kids actually sing, "Walmart is eeeevil, Walmart is eeeevil," whenever we see one on the side of the freeway. Smile ) Obviously, I share my POV with my children so if one of them were to want to shop there, we'd have a talk about it. They wouldn't be using my money to do it, though.

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Ok, I can see that. I just think if he wants to be a complete a## and be offensive, then that's his right. At this point my son is too young to request one brand of clothes over another. Perhaps when he's older it'll be a different ball game, but I can't see telling him "No, you can't have that shirt, because the guy that runs the company is a douche bag."

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"Athena4" wrote:

Ok, I can see that. I just think if he wants to be a complete a## and be offensive, then that's his right. At this point my son is too young to request one brand of clothes over another. Perhaps when he's older it'll be a different ball game, but I can't see telling him "No, you can't have that shirt, because the guy that runs the company is a douche bag."

I don't think it should be illegal to have such a store obviously, but it is not a place I would shop. He has the right to be a jerk, and I have the right to not spend my money there.

Joined: 05/31/06
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"Athena4" wrote:

Ok, I can see that. I just think if he wants to be a complete a## and be offensive, then that's his right. At this point my son is too young to request one brand of clothes over another. Perhaps when he's older it'll be a different ball game, but I can't see telling him "No, you can't have that shirt, because the guy that runs the company is a douche bag."

I would have no problem telling my children "no, we don't shop there because that brand intentionally excludes people with larger body types- and they stamp their brand all over their clothing. By wearing their brand you subtly or not so subtly say that you support their message of exclusion based on size and our family will not support that with our dollars." We do that with lots of other things (Walmart, chik filet, McDonald's, bigoted churches etc) so it's not a foreign concept to our kids.

KimPossible's picture
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"Athena4" wrote:

Ok, I can see that. I just think if he wants to be a complete a## and be offensive, then that's his right. At this point my son is too young to request one brand of clothes over another. Perhaps when he's older it'll be a different ball game, but I can't see telling him "No, you can't have that shirt, because the guy that runs the company is a douche bag."

There are other stores that we don't support, like Wal-mart. I have had good conversations with my kids about why we don't shop at wal-mart. My goal is to instill in them the same desire to not support the store. That would be the same in this case. I could tell them we don't support A&F and why. If they wanted something from there I would have no problem re-stating that we don't shop there and why.

If they had their own money and wanted to spend it there, that might be a little different for me. I probably would not forbid them to do that but i would equip them with what they need to make an informed decision to shop there or not.

ETA: Or what Melissa said. Guess i should have read first. Also wanted to add, about my last paragraph, i'm assuming older children, like tweens and teenagers type thing. Emma is 11 and she is great at understanding stuff like this.

Joined: 03/16/15
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Maybe my wording has been poor insofar? I don't mean that I'm making a case for why people should shop there, or that others should spend money and support what they don't believe in.
We don't do Chik-Fil-A, my son understands why because I explained it to him. There are certain things we don't participate in or support, so I get that.

GloriaInTX's picture
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I have no problem telling my kids no we don't shop there because they have almost naked people in their advertising. I love Walmart though. My son works there and they treat him great.

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My 9-year-old son understands those things too. And yes, I find A&C really revolting and have never wanted to shop there anyway. Yech. They have a right to do whatever they want but it makes me despise them even more than I already did.

SID081108's picture
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"GloriaInTX" wrote:

I have no problem telling my kids no we don't shop there because they have almost naked people in their advertising. I love Walmart though. My son works there and they treat him great.

Despite your son's individual experience as a Walmart employee, they have horrible business practices that are well documented. We don't shop there and we sure as hell don't shop at A & F.

And whoever said that the A & F CEO shouldn't be judging anyone about "beauty" is SO right. What a sleazeball.

ClairesMommy's picture
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A&F are few and far between in these parts, but I don't shop there because I simply don't like the style that much. It's nice and all, but just not ME. But, this doofus clearly does not understand the concept of supply and demand. As long as there are teens getting overweight on fast food, big gulps and processed junk there will be an ever-growing market for XL and XXL sizes. He is essentially discriminating his brand right out of business. Soon only a small percentage of teens will be skinny enough for his clothes. :shrug:

After reading the article I think I would not shop there even if I saw something to die for in the store that I just had to have. If my kids asked why we don't shop there I would tell them bluntly why. Stuff like that I don't need to dumb down for my kids. They get that concept.

KimPossible's picture
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"ClairesMommy" wrote:

A&F are few and far between in these parts, but I don't shop there because I simply don't like the style that much. It's nice and all, but just not ME. But, this doofus clearly does not understand the concept of supply and demand. As long as there are teens getting overweight on fast food, big gulps and processed junk there will be an ever-growing market for XL and XXL sizes. He is essentially discriminating his brand right out of business. Soon only a small percentage of teens will be skinny enough for his clothes. :shrug:

After reading the article I think I would not shop there even if I saw something to die for in the store that I just had to have. If my kids asked why we don't shop there I would tell them bluntly why. Stuff like that I don't need to dumb down for my kids. They get that concept.

You know I don't think his theory is poor business logic actually....I think it can theoretically be effective, well it could have been if his philosophy was never publicized. I agree that you can market to a specific group and be successful, even if it's not the biggest group. I just don't agree with him personally that it means it's okay to alienate people or encourage stigmatiz ation of larger people for the sake of business. Especially kids. How awful. It reinforces all sorts of harmful terrible things

KimPossible's picture
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DP

GloriaInTX's picture
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"SID081108" wrote:

Despite your son's individual experience as a Walmart employee, they have horrible business practices that are well documented. We don't shop there and we sure as hell don't shop at A & F.

I disagree that Walmart treats their employees any different than other similar retailers, and I have other family members that loved working there also, including my niece who was a store manager and retired after 20 years. But that is a different debate.

Spacers's picture
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"GloriaInTX" wrote:

I disagree that Walmart treats their employees any different than other similar retailers.

I guess you've never seen the documentary, "Walmart: The High Cost of Low Prices," because otherwise you would know that this is not true. You can watch the full movie here:
Walmart: The High Cost Of Low Prices FULL MOVIE - YouTube

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"Spacers" wrote:

I guess you've never seen the documentary, "Walmart: The High Cost of Low Prices," because otherwise you would know that this is not true. You can watch the full movie here:
Walmart: The High Cost Of Low Prices FULL MOVIE - YouTube

So where is the documentary that shows Target or Sears (who I personally worked for that was no different) or Kmart or any other low priced retailer are different? How about McDonalds or Wendys or Taco Bell. All these employers us the exact same practices just no one hates them enough to do a documentary.

SID081108's picture
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"GloriaInTX" wrote:

I disagree that Walmart treats their employees any different than other similar retailers, and I have other family members that loved working there also, including my niece who was a store manager and retired after 20 years. But that is a different debate.

Yes, it may be a different debate, but you simply can't ignore factual documentation of their business practices on the grounds of one or several family members' good experiences working for them. Those individual experiences are not even a tiny sliver in the pie that is their business model. And my biggest issues with them don't even have anything to do with how they treat their employees. Their offensive business practices go WAY beyond that.

I don't see how that would be any different than me ignoring this information about A & F's CEO, or their half-naked catalogues, because I have a great friend from college who worked there for years and loved the company as an employer. The latter is simply not relevant to whether or not they are a business I want to give my money to.

SID081108's picture
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"GloriaInTX" wrote:

So where is the documentary that shows Target or Sears (who I personally worked for that was no different) or Kmart or any other low priced retailer are different? How about McDonalds or Wendys or Taco Bell. All these employers us the exact same practices just no one hates them enough to do a documentary.

Where are the facts that all of those retailers use "the exact same practices"? My opinion on Walmart was established before I even saw that documentary. It was based on countless news stories over the years that have cemented my feelings about Walmart. Stories like this one...

Yahoo! Shine - Women's Lifestyle | Healthy Living and Fashion Blogs

And like I said, this is just one example of MANY. I hardly believe that the media ONLY shows negative stories about Walmart but ignores those of their competitors, such as Target. That just doesn't make sense.

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"KimPossible" wrote:

You know I don't think his theory is poor business logic actually....I think it can theoretically be effective, well it could have been if his philosophy was never publicized. I agree that you can market to a specific group and be successful, even if it's not the biggest group. I just don't agree with him personally that it means it's okay to alienate people or encourage stigmatiz ation of larger people for the sake of business. Especially kids. How awful. It reinforces all sorts of harmful terrible things

Obviously a lot of fashion labels and stores do this, but they don't announce it. There are stores that clearly offer nothing or next to nothing in larger sizes, because that's not the clientele they want, that's not how they see their brand. It's creepier when it's teens but it's out there for adults too. I don't like the A&C culture anyway, so this just confirms how I feel about them.

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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

Obviously a lot of fashion labels and stores do this, but they don't announce it. There are stores that clearly offer nothing or next to nothing in larger sizes, because that's not the clientele they want, that's not how they see their brand. It's creepier when it's teens but it's out there for adults too. I don't like the A&C culture anyway, so this just confirms how I feel about them.

I don't think i ever realized this before. So when i first read about this the other day i was surprised. I thought to myself "seriously? They dont' carry XL?" I guess its true that i often do not see XXL in some stores. But I had no idea that lots of places do this. Can I ask? What stores?

I will say this. I only shop at about 4 stores for my clothes. If i found out all 4 of those stores had similar attitudes or philosophies, i dont' know what I would do. I am not a natural clothes shopper and the thought of just going to find some other place to buy my clothes makes me unhappy. it would be difficult for me and turn something i enjoy doing now into something of an unpleasant chore.

I mean its not really any better if the store leader does it but doesn't announce it, is it?

bunnyfufu's picture
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"Potter75" wrote:

It actually made my stomach hurt when I read this. Of course I don't shop there as I'm an adult, but I would never buy their clothing for my kids as they got older. I find his comments disgusting ~ teens are self conscious enough ~ and this is just intentionally classist and hurtful and gross. I would not allow my children to wear clothing which purposely fed into such a mean spirited intention. We will stick to brands which cater to everyone.

I hear what you are saying.

I don't know that there are brands that cater to everyone. I think A+F is not very good quality/style wise and costly for what it does provide. I get that there is a market for it. But don't, wouldn't, won't shop there because it's just not very good.

Might as well go to a boutique and sale shop. When I do go to Macy's, etc. the smalls and mediums are gone. The 2's and 4's are gone (I think they must under buy them, because all the sales racks have are large and xl.) and I do not want to dress like a teenager at 41. So I end up looking forever to find something classy in a shop designed for teens.

:/

Joined: 05/31/06
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Yeah, after I wrote that I realized that I probably was going to get called out on it. I shop for my kids at Gap, Old Navy, crewcuts, etc, they pretty much carry all kids sizes, I think? My kids are young yet, though.

As an adult I am short and need a small size, I honestly (like Kim) don't have a good handle on what the stores that I tend to frequent to carry as far as larger adult sizes. It may well be that they DON'T cater to everyone....but when I wear that brand or that style, it isn't screaming "I wear less than a size 10 and I support that jerks message", you know? In other words, I'm not going to go out and research the opinion of all presidents and CEO's of clothing shops on different weight groups (over or under). However, you can't unring a bell, and now that I know this persons opinion or marketing scheme, I will choose appropriately.

I agree with you about most department stores, I can't ever find my size there ~ they only have larger sizes. We do have one that is an exception and I go there for that reason. Like Kim I tend to shop at about 4 stores. I also don't enjoy shopping, its a means to an end.

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"bunnyfufu" wrote:

I don't know that there are brands that cater to everyone. I think A+F is not very good quality/style wise and costly for what it does provide. I get that there is a market for it. But don't, wouldn't, won't shop there because it's just not very good.

When i was a teenager their quality was actually very good, pricey, but not as pricey as it is now. I had shirts that lasted for years and years from there. And my DAD actually liked to shop there too. He liked their men's pants. Their roots were actually not in the 'hot skinny teenager' market originally. There were no racey photos on their bags and walls and nothing said A&F on it either and then it seems like over the course of my teenager hood up through the end of college they changed tremendously.

Its interesting to see how brands change though. I remember being able to scrounge up money in college and shop out of the JCrew catalog...in College! That wouldn't be the case anymore, they've moved their pricing range up a tier or two and do the wedding thing now and stuff like that.

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I also shop for most of my stuff at Old Navy, and I do it online because I don't like shopping. It's probably why I don't dress appropriately for my age or my job, but what can you do? I buy the kids stuff and add a bunch of things for me. Occasionally I'll branch out to Gap or Eddie Bauer or Macys, all online.

J Crew is an interesting example, they generally do not have much that fits my body type. I don't have a flat stomach, I have big boobs, so 90% of their stuff doesn't fit me even when I am at a good weight.

ClairesMommy's picture
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I shop at Once Upon a Child Smile Everything's pre-shrunk and dirt cheap, and all the good quality labels under one roof. When I do buy new I like Gap for Ben and Old Navy for both of them. I also get a ton of hand-me-downs for Ben from my brother who has 3 boys older than him. Claire....well, she's the only girl out of 8 so we don't much in the way of used clothes for her. I don't mind. I LOVE shopping for girl clothes. Sooooo pretty the spring/summer stuff out right now Smile

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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

J Crew is an interesting example, they generally do not have much that fits my body type. I don't have a flat stomach, I have big boobs, so 90% of their stuff doesn't fit me even when I am at a good weight.

I just checked out JCrew and they sell 18 and 20's, as well as Tall sizes. I don't know, nothing is going to fit everyone right, but they do offer the sizes, which to me is so much different than what A&F is doing.

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"Potter75" wrote:

I just checked out JCrew and they sell 18 and 20's, as well as Tall sizes. I don't know, nothing is going to fit everyone right, but they do offer the sizes, which to me is so much different than what A&F is doing.

I admit I haven't shopped there in almost 20 years...I gave up. Were you in their stores or online? Even Old Navy has some lines that are online-only.

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Online. I don't know if they stock them in the stores.

But they also don't carry petites in the store, like Banana and many other stores. Its maddening for those of us who are short. At 5'3 their pants are always WAY too long on me. It just is what it is when you aren't a standard height or weight or shape, I guess?

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"Potter75" wrote:

Online. I don't know if they stock them in the stores.

But they also don't carry petites in the store, like Banana and many other stores. Its maddening for those of us who are short. At 5'3 their pants are always WAY too long on me. It just is what it is when you aren't a standard height or weight or shape, I guess?

Yep. I get why they don't stock all those things...probably not economically worthwhile to physically get them into the stores. I shop online anyway! I have no time to go to stores and I don't enjoy it anyway.

ClairesMommy's picture
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I am equally frustrated with pants. At 5'7" I should have no problem finding pants that aren't too long in the leg, but nope. Since I have an extremely long torso the waistband of most pants comes to somewhere between my belly button and pubic bone (seriously), and then the legs are too frikkin long. So frustrating.

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I agree with JCrew...I used to do okay with out the extra pounds I've carried but it would have to be a loose shirt due to my boobs. Now, I don't even bother. I could never do their pants because I was petite but I also have muscular thighs and a big bum. I have a hard time with pants all around because designers like to think that because you are 5'2" you must also weigh 82 lbs and have no boobs. (that happens too but not all of us! Smile )

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Since I've been on both sides of size spectrum I can tell you that a lot of the stores I love just didn't make things for heavier women - like Loft and The Gap. And I have to agree with Kim - A&F used to have great quality clothes. I had a gorgeous wool sweater that I wore for about 7 or 8 years, and only got rid of it because I gained a lot of weight. My sister still has the one she got from there, and she's had it for 17 or 18 years. It looks as good now as it did then.

Has this CEO been in place since the start of the company?

Rivergallery's picture
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I have way too much to remember to waste my time remembering who to boycott. We don't shop new usually.. So if my kids happen to be wearing an "evil" brand it would be because it was free or we got used somewhere.. Only thing I have bought them new were socks and underwear, and even then they were on sale.

KimPossible's picture
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"Rivergallery" wrote:

I have way too much to remember to waste my time remembering who to boycott. We don't shop new usually.. So if my kids happen to be wearing an "evil" brand it would be because it was free or we got used somewhere.. Only thing I have bought them new were socks and underwear, and even then they were on sale.

I would buy stuff from stores I don't like to support second hand. That def. wouldn't bother me. I have some hand me downs from friends and relatives that are from Walmart.

bunnyfufu's picture
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"KimPossible" wrote:

I would buy stuff from stores I don't like to support second hand. That def. wouldn't bother me. I have some hand me downs from friends and relatives that are from Walmart.

Agree. I haven't stepped foot into a WalMart in over 15 year. For real. But my mom sends the kids gifts and I just say thank you.

as a sidenote, re:quality
I get that the stuff will last a long time and that it is good cotton, I am gauging quality in a different (super-nutso and personally elitist) way. I have some t-shirts that I will hand down to my kids because they are so incredibly cool. And with a concert ticket, they cost me less. Smile

bunnyfufu's picture
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ooh! and just for laughs, here is one of my favorite bloggers talking about the same thing.

People I Want to Punch in the Throat: Abercrombie & Fitch

AlyssaEimers's picture
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I think there is a difference between wearing something from Walmart where it is not obvious that the clothing came from Walmart, and wearing clothing that says Abercrombie in big letters on it. (I have seen many shirts like that) It would be a little like the difference of eating some Chick Fil A that someone bought you and wearing a t-shirt or cap with the Chick Fil A logo on it. One is just filling a need. The other is saying I support this company and I am proud of it.

I might be willing to let my daughters wear clothing that was given to them if I could not tell it was from AB or if it only said it on the tag. I would not let my daughters wear clothing that advertised the brand with big letters on it that said their name.

ETA - This is of course barring an emergency. For some reason the night of my house burning down as a teenager came to mind as I typed this. If my girls were standing out in the snow in the middle of the night in the winter with nothing but a t-shirt, I couldn't care less what brand of clothing they had on. I would just want them to be warm.

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I don't like clothes that advertise where they were purchased. . .I think the store should be paying YOU to be a billboard, you shouldn't pay the store. So I don't buy stuff for the kids (or myself) that has the store's name on it.

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Bigot mentioned hateful gay chicken mentioned

We don't end around a boycott by allowing other people to purchase our products for us. For instance, when our kindy kids school sent out a newsletter announcing "chik fil-a" or however one spells it night- we emailed the school to let them know that we were disappointed that they would partner with a bigoted hateful company and let them know that regretfully this would be one event that our family would not be able to participate in. The purpose of a boycott is to financially hurt a company. To eat their product- even if someone else bought it - would be to support them.

And obviously we aren't talking about " we'll what if you are starving and chik fil a was all you had to eat and you were on a deserted island and you only had a volleyball to talk to" sort of scenario. Just normal life.

KimPossible's picture
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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

I don't like clothes that advertise where they were purchased. . .I think the store should be paying YOU to be a billboard, you shouldn't pay the store. So I don't buy stuff for the kids (or myself) that has the store's name on it.

Same here, I don't like it either. But i do break that rule sometimes. Aodhan has a tee that says old navy on it. But it's in cursive and has some graphic behind it... It's kind of hard to read. I bought it quickly because he needed something for 'black and white day' at school. Also my hoodie sweatshirt that i have right now is a gap one and says gap in big orange letters. I wear my hooded to death. My plain black one from the gap years ago finally died. I tried to replace it with a dirt cheap ugly magenta one from old navy but I despise the thing. It has a frumpy fit and is a hideous color... Probably why it was three dollars. I went to the gap outlet and these sweatshirts were like 11 dollars... A much better quality fabric and a good fit. So I bought it and I wear it a ton. Sweatshirts can be expensive.. So when I needed to replace mine, I had a hard time turning down a good deal.

Other places where brand advertisement on clothing doesn't bother me is logos on polls because it seems pretty part for the course and some athletic wear logos don't bother me unless they are huge and obnoxiously placed... Under Armour does that sometimes.

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
Posts: 1534

We used to try to keep our kids out of clothing that was an advertisement, then DD1 hit 6th grade and all the sudden the unspoken uniform involve Aeropostle t-shirts and hoodies. I just didnt feel the need to fight that battle. She has grown out of it now but dd2 is starting to ask for the stuff so we may have another year of it

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3183

Yeah, I haven't had to fight any battles. My oldest is 9 and he doesn't care what his clothes say, although he likes when they say STAR WARS.

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
Posts: 1534

Laurie, my oldest did not care at all about clothes until about the middle of 6th grade, and with her it only lasted for about a year. She is over it now. I think my next 2 girls will be completely and totally into fashion.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6560

This is funny that we were just talking about this. DD was given a bag of clothes recently and this morning I saw that one of the sweatshirts said Abercrombie on it. We will probably drop it off at the Good Will.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3309

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

This is funny that we were just talking about this. DD was given a bag of clothes recently and this morning I saw that one of the sweatshirts said Abercrombie on it. We will probably drop it off at the Good Will.

Yeah. If it actually has the name on it, I probably wouldn't keep it....i wouldn't want to do any free advertising. But gifts or hand me downs that don't have the name plastered on them? they don't get any extra money from me.. The stuff has already been purchased. So I don't see the that as big of a deal. Plus the merits of using second hand things outweighs the one symbolic boycott to me. The fundraiser scenario is interesting. I probably wouldn't go to something like that either, even though the decision to have it was already made.

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