"Affluenza"
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  1. #1
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    Default "Affluenza"

    'Affluenza' teen gets probation for driving drunk, killing 4 | National News - WCVB Home


    Did he get off too easy? Do you think this sets a legal precedence?
    Mom to Elizabeth (6) and Corinne (4)

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    Community Host Alissa_Sal's Avatar
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    It's seriously disgusting to think that he got off that easy because he comes from a wealthy family. Basically, a teen that came from a less affluent family but did the exact same act would have gotten a harsher sentence? That is just wrong.
    -Alissa, mom to Tristan (5) and Reid (the baby!)

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    Wait. So the cure for affluenza is to continue along the no consequences or boundaries path?

    Your parents didn't teach you any boundaries so I'm not going to either.

    Part of me hopes he violates his probation just enough to get thrown I'm prison but without hurting anymore innocent people.

    Since his parents are so affluent I hope they go bankrupt paying out in civil lawsuits to the victims' families.
    mom2robbie and ftmom like this.

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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    Though it makes good headlines, I don't really think it had anything to do with how much money his family had. It sounds like more than just rich kids are getting off.

    As teens drink and drive, Texas only talks tough | Dallas Morning News

    They were talking about this on the radio this morning, and the way they talked is that judges don't want to send juveniles to prison on DWI charges because they end up with the more hardened kids that have been sent in for more violent crimes and come out worse than they started, and therefore more likely to re-offend. Since this kid is 16, even if the judge had sentenced him to 20 years he would have gotten out in 2 years when he is 18 because that is the normal practice. So the judge sentenced him to probation for 10 years which is much more restrictive than parole and that way he would be monitored closely for the whole 10 years. I'm still a little up in the air on this because it really seems like he should have gotten some jail time, but it really sounds like this is normal practice and they didn't give him any special treatment.
    Last edited by GloriaInTX; 12-12-2013 at 06:36 PM.
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    It really sickens me that he got off with so little, but I am not 100% convinced this is all about wealth. If you look at similar cases in Texas to this it really appears this sentence seems to the be the norm.
    Lisa
    Molly, Morgan, Mia and Carson

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    Quote Originally Posted by GloriaInTX View Post
    Though it makes good headlines, I don't really think it had anything to do with how much money his family had. It sounds like more than just rich kids are getting off.

    As teens drink and drive, Texas only talks tough | Dallas Morning News

    They were talking about this on the radio this morning, and the way they talked is that judges don't want to send juveniles to prison on DWI charges because they end up with the more hardened kids that have been sent in for more violent crimes and come out worse than they started, and therefore more likely to re-offend. Since this kid is 16, even if the judge had sentenced him to 20 years he would have gotten out in 2 years when he is 18 because that is the normal practice. So the judge sentenced him to probation for 10 years which is much more restrictive than parole and that way he would be monitored closely for the whole 10 years. I'm still a little up in the air on this because it really seems like he should have gotten some jail time, but it really sounds like this is normal practice and they didn't give him any special treatment.
    I think his crime was pretty violent. I mean, if you kill someone with poison it wouldn't necessarily be messy, but the act itself - murder - seems violent by nature. I could post pictures from all sorts of murder scenes and some from the accident. Yeah, violent.

    Also, how do you come out worse than murder? I can see the argument if a minor stole a diamond necklace and then graduated to GTA or robbery, but murder is pretty much the top of the hierarchy of crimes.

    Teens aren't going to take the law seriously if the adults aren't. And clearly they aren't.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mom3girls View Post
    It really sickens me that he got off with so little, but I am not 100% convinced this is all about wealth. If you look at similar cases in Texas to this it really appears this sentence seems to the be the norm.
    Then why use "affluenza" as a defense?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ethanwinfield View Post
    I think his crime was pretty violent. I mean, if you kill someone with poison it wouldn't necessarily be messy, but the act itself - murder - seems violent by nature. I could post pictures from all sorts of murder scenes and some from the accident. Yeah, violent.

    Also, how do you come out worse than murder? I can see the argument if a minor stole a diamond necklace and then graduated to GTA or robbery, but murder is pretty much the top of the hierarchy of crimes.

    Teens aren't going to take the law seriously if the adults aren't. And clearly they aren't.
    Am I missing something? We are talking about DUI right? While terrible I agree, it is not the same as someone who went out on purpose to kill someone. I do for sure think 20 years in prison could make a kid who would otherwise be ok, into a hardened criminal.

    ~Bonita~

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    See I think if you choose to drive under the influence you have chosen to possibly hurt someone. You're lucky if you don't. I think it should be considered murder.
    Mom to Elizabeth (6) and Corinne (4)

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    Am I missing something? We are talking about DUI right? While terrible I agree, it is not the same as someone who went out on purpose to kill someone. I do for sure think 20 years in prison could make a kid who would otherwise be ok, into a hardened criminal.
    Four people were parked on the side of the road trying to fix a broken-down vehicle. He drove into them at 70 mph.

    Had he been sober and drove straight into 4 people at 70 mph killing all 4 of them, what would you consider that crime? Being .24 BAC shouldn't give him a pass.

    DUI murder prosecutions in California are based on a 1981 state Supreme Court ruling that allowed fatal drunken driving crashes to be charged as second-degree murders. The state's high court ruled that DUI meets the malice standard required for murder because it shows a conscious disregard for human life.
    Murder Charges Increasing in Fatal DUI Cases
    What crime are we worried about Ethan Couch graduating to? It's highly likely he will drink and drive again. Shouldn't we also try to make the punishment a deterrent?

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