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  1. #11
    Community Host Alissa_Sal's Avatar
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    My son's preschool has a allergen free table, and they split the kids up so that kids who don't have nuts/other allergens in their lunch can sit at the nut free table too (basically, they make sure to split it up so that the kids with allergies aren't sitting at a table by themselves.) All the kids bring their own lunch, but the school provides a mid morning snack which is allergen free. The school's philosophy is that the world is not nut free, so kids have to learn to be safe with their allergies, and they help facilitate that. I think that is a reasonable approach to take. I actually think about that when I'm packing T's lunches, and I intentionally try to limit the amount of "nut" lunches I pack so that T can sit with his friends at the nut free table too. I would go completely nut free if they asked us too, but I'm glad they don't because since he goes to a Jewish preschool, we have to pack kosher dairy meals (no meat) so limiting nuts would limit us further.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatienceW View Post
    so your kids cant even take a ham and cheese sandwich or string cheese? I don't agree with that! That is taking it a bit far in my opinion. some kids only eat that kinda of stuff!
    It's okay for lunch, but for the snacks they eat in the classroom they're very limited. There's no "mandate", but we're strongly encouraged to bring allergy-free foods. I'm going to be screwed when some kid with a banana allergy is in their class! That's my go-to when we're low on the other "safe" things.
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    Oh, classroom limitation should definitely be limited to anaphylactic/severe reactions. Otherwise, children should just learn not to eat or touch food besides what their parents have packed for them (and I think in situations with severe reactions even very young kids know this).

  4. #14
    Mega Poster PatienceW's Avatar
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    oh ok. I thought you meant in the cafeteria.... I have fruit allergies in my class now. raspberries, last year I had a mango allergy. I have taught my 3 yr old to ask about nuts. so yes they can be taught young. now I have to add mango into it bc the allergist said there can be a cross reaction with tree nuts and mangos

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    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mommydearest View Post
    It's okay for lunch, but for the snacks they eat in the classroom they're very limited. There's no "mandate", but we're strongly encouraged to bring allergy-free foods. I'm going to be screwed when some kid with a banana allergy is in their class! That's my go-to when we're low on the other "safe" things.
    Same here. There's no peanut-free rule in our schools, because I think it would be almost impossible to eliminate all foods coming into the school with even a trace of peanuts or peanut oil. We're just strongly advised to not send peanut products with the kids.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PatienceW View Post
    oh ok. I thought you meant in the cafeteria.... I have fruit allergies in my class now. raspberries, last year I had a mango allergy. I have taught my 3 yr old to ask about nuts. so yes they can be taught young. now I have to add mango into it bc the allergist said there can be a cross reaction with tree nuts and mangos
    Watch out for Avocados too. We've had reactions to them.



    This hits close to home as DS is peanut and tree nut allergic. DD was also dairy sensitive for the first year of her life. I have a friend who refuses to believe that it's as serious as it is. She always complains about no peanut butter sandwiches when we get together (which is 3-4 times a YEAR, since they live so far away). It pisses me off because my son could die. Just please find another lunch option for one day?!

    It's a little different when it is school. I think a separate table where any kid can go is a good solution. It's the family's responsibility to provide food the child can eat IMO. I do think the school needs to provide information about snacks/lunches so that the family can properly decide if the child can have that snack/lunch. For example, my daycare provides lunch for the kids. When DD was milk sensitive I was forever asking questions about how the food was made. For example, mashed potatoes can be made with milk/butter, or they can be made from a box with water (ick!). I needed to know which way they were made so it was frustrating if they can't tell you that. I'm not looking forward to grade school and all the questions I'll need to ask then.

    it's easy to teach my son to not eat nuts or peanut butters, but looking out for peanut oil...that's difficult at 3 years old, or shoot even 7 I'd think!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire'sMommy View Post
    Same here. There's no peanut-free rule in our schools, because I think it would be almost impossible to eliminate all foods coming into the school with even a trace of peanuts or peanut oil. We're just strongly advised to not send peanut products with the kids.
    At the school DH works at there is over a thousand students. There are signs in the parking lot that no peanuts or products are aloud on school property. I just do not see how you could possibly do that with other allergies like milk.

    ~Bonita~

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    Mega Poster PatienceW's Avatar
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    Mel thanks for the avacodo warning. the allergist did not mention anything about that. he did tell us we can eat at chick fila because the peanut oil they use is ok (because of how it is processed) though I still have not tried it!

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    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    At the school DH works at there is over a thousand students. There are signs in the parking lot that no peanuts or products are aloud on school property. I just do not see how you could possibly do that with other allergies like milk.
    Asking children not to have milk at school would be unreasonable, IMO. And from what I've learned about allergies and all the testing DS went through, a peanut allergy is much more common than a true milk allergy. I'm not talking sensitivity or intolerance - I mean an allergic reaction that can cause anaphylaxis. The increasing prevalence of allergies in kids is shocking to me. Not a single student in any of my classes from K - 12 was allergic to nuts or dairy or strawberries or bee stings. Then again, I'm old.
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire'sMommy View Post
    Asking children not to have milk at school would be unreasonable, IMO. And from what I've learned about allergies and all the testing DS went through, a peanut allergy is much more common than a true milk allergy. I'm not talking sensitivity or intolerance - I mean an allergic reaction that can cause anaphylaxis. The increasing prevalence of allergies in kids is shocking to me. Not a single student in any of my classes from K - 12 was allergic to nuts or dairy or strawberries or bee stings. Then again, I'm old.
    I do agree that it seems that there are more allergies today then when I was young. The little girl I was referring to truly is allergic to milk and soy. She is also full of birth defects though. She has a rare genetic disorder that causes a host of problems including being profoundly Deaf, cleft pallet, and a ton of GI issues.

    ~Bonita~

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