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    Default Amazon Prime Air

    Amazon Prime Air: Delivery by Drones Could Arrive As Early as 2015 - ABC News

    Is this something you would support? Do you see it happening reasonably soon? Would you be afraid your packages would break?

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    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    I'd have to know why its advantageous for a company to use this method of delivery? I'm not really sure i get it. Is it because it would make delivery faster so people don't have to wait as long? Is it more environmentally friendly? I'm not sure why it would be...individual machines per delivery doesn't seem environmentally friendly to me. I see that the safety issue hasn't' really been hammered out yet.

    I'd need to know more about it to know if i support it or not

    My packages breaking are the least of my concerns/questions as I'm assuming if they were damaged during delivery, amazon would replace them.

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    I'm sure it would be a premium service that would be very expensive. The faster the delivery the higher the price even now. So I very much doubt it would replace normal delivery, it would just be an option if you really needed it quickly for some reason. Most people aren't going to be willing to pay the extra cost for every day things.
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    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GloriaInTX View Post
    I'm sure it would be a premium service that would be very expensive. The faster the delivery the higher the price even now. So I very much doubt it would replace normal delivery, it would just be an option if you really needed it quickly for some reason. Most people aren't going to be willing to pay the extra cost for every day things.
    Then it would come down to the environmental/safety impact. If its just so rich people can get their sh1te faster (I have no patience for our society's impatience).....i want it to have minimal impact on everything else


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    I so totally do not want a bunch of those things flying around my neighborhood! It's bad enough when we have a FedEx truck, a UPS truck, and a local courier van all blocking the street when they show up at the same time. Now we're going to add flying machines??? One of those hits one of my kids while they're riding their bikes or playing out front, there will be no Amazon left when I'm done kicking their ***.
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    Interesting blog post on this topic.

    http://blog.hubspot.com/uattr/real-p...elivery-drones

    Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos runs one of the world's most notoriously secretive organizations. Yet last night he went on national TV and showed off a bunch of dazzling delivery drones that he says won't realistically arrive in the real world for another four or five years, which in realspeak means they're a decade or more away.

    Why is this incredibly tight-lipped company suddenly showing off prototypes? The answer is that these drones were not designed to carry packages, but to give a lift to Amazon's image.
    For one thing, today is Cyber Monday, the day when everyone goes shopping online. Amazon somehow got CBS and 60 Minutes to create a 14-minute free ad spot for Amazon on the eve of this huge shopping day.

    Did Amazon control the timing of the story and insist that the piece must run on the night before Cyber Monday? Was this a condition of the deal in exchange for getting access to Bezos? I think you'd be naive to believe otherwise, but who knows? Maybe it was just a lucky coincidence.

    But there's another factor at work here. Bezos and Amazon are still reeling from the recent publication of a not entirely flattering book by Businessweek reporter Brad Stone. The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon portrays Bezos as a ruthless tyrant and a "penny-pinching ballbuster," as Gawker put it.

    As soon as the book came out, Amazon swung into action trying to discredit Stone. Jeff Bezos's wife MacKenzie Bezos published a scathing negative review of the book (on Amazon, of course) in which she claims the work contains "numerous factual inaccuracies." Craig Berman, VP of Global Communications at Amazon, issued his own statement blasting the book and criticizing Stone for not making an effort to get his facts right.

    This is a very big deal. Amazon PR typically doesn't say anything to anyone. They're the most tight-lipped bunch in the business, right up there with Apple. Suddenly they were all over the place.

    Worse, the spin campaign didn't work. Stone's book became a best-seller, and even won the prestigious Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year award.

    Now, suddenly, for no apparent reason, this company that never tells anybody anything about any future products, ever, is showing off prototype drones that are years away. This is like Apple inviting Charlie Rose in to show off that 60-inch TV that it may or may not ever actually manufacture and sell to the public.

    Why the change in policy?

    Counter Punch

    This is about shifting the narrative. The first spin campaign didn't work, so now you do what PR people call "closing one door and opening another." You deflect and distract.

    You line up Charlie Rose to do one of his famous softball-tossing puff pieces, and while he's there you trot out some amazingly impossibly cool new technology to dazzle the folks in the cheap seats.

    You let Jeff Bezos appear on camera being all goofy and happy and looking like the world's friendliest little nerd, talking to Uncle Charlie about how much he and his band of happy elves at Amazon just love exploring and tinkering and innovating. Let Bezos do his weird laugh, which you can catch in the final minute of this video:


    Smoke and Mirrors

    Years ago I read a book about how the Spanish conquered the Incas in Peru and converted them to Catholicism. The trick, they discovered, was to fill the churches with mirrors and pieces of glass, and then light lots of candles, which produced some dazzling effects. It was, quite literally, smoke and mirrors.

    Same here. Amazon's non-existent drones are soaring all over the blogosphere. This morning they were the top story on TechMeme, the influential aggregation site. Business Insider, which counts Bezos as an investor, had a huge photo of an Amazon drone at the top of its homepage, plus five other stories about Amazon, including one that says the drone announcement was just a way to gin up publicity around Cyber Monday.

    Business Insider also ran a slideshow of photos of Amazon delivery centers, and put the Amazon drone story at the top of its list of "10 things you need to know this morning," and published a link to a story on Quartz about the Amazon drones.

    The only place the drones aren't soaring is here in the real world. In fact the FAA says it could be 2026 before these things are really in use. But who cares? These drones weren't created to carry packages. They were created, and put on display, to boost sales and buff up a CEO's wounded pride. Toward that end, they worked like a charm.

    Those of us who work in marketing should offer a tip of the cap to our peers at Amazon. These marketers just coopted a major TV network and got 60 MInutes, a legendary investigative journalism program, to carry their water for them and help bury a book that contains some serious, and critical, journalism. Depending on your point of view, that's either incredibly depressing or incredibly brilliant. Maybe both.

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    Mega Poster mom3girls's Avatar
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    I dont get it, why do people need things automatically? But I did hear that environmentally they could have a huge impact as Drones have no carbon emissions.
    Lisa
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    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mom3girls View Post
    I dont get it, why do people need things automatically? But I did hear that environmentally they could have a huge impact as Drones have no carbon emissions.
    It would just be different environmental issues with drones that don't run on a gas engine. They would have to run on some kind of fuel cell batteries which can wreak havoc on the environment if not properly disposed of, like if they crash into a creek or a watershed, or even onto a street and aren't properly cleaned up. Is Amazon going to track them down & clean up the mess? I don't see that happening. There are also significant environmental issues in the manufacturing process of most batteries.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    It would just be different environmental issues with drones that don't run on a gas engine. They would have to run on some kind of fuel cell batteries which can wreak havoc on the environment if not properly disposed of, like if they crash into a creek or a watershed, or even onto a street and aren't properly cleaned up. Is Amazon going to track them down & clean up the mess? I don't see that happening. There are also significant environmental issues in the manufacturing process of most batteries.
    I agree, but the show I was listening to this morning was using this in favor of drones.
    Lisa
    Molly, Morgan, Mia and Carson

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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    It would just be different environmental issues with drones that don't run on a gas engine. They would have to run on some kind of fuel cell batteries which can wreak havoc on the environment if not properly disposed of, like if they crash into a creek or a watershed, or even onto a street and aren't properly cleaned up. Is Amazon going to track them down & clean up the mess? I don't see that happening. There are also significant environmental issues in the manufacturing process of most batteries.
    I imagine the drones would be pretty expensive and probably have a GPS or some kind of locator on them. I don't see Amazon just leaving one out there if it crashed, plus they would have to retrieve the package that was with it.
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