Banning hand held devices for children under age 12
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Thread: Banning hand held devices for children under age 12

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    Default Banning hand held devices for children under age 12

    10 Reasons Why Handheld Devices Should Be Banned for Children Under the Age of 12?|?Cris Rowan

    The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Canadian Society of Pediatrics state infants aged 0-2 years should not have any exposure to technology, 3-5 years be restricted to one hour per day, and 6-18 years restricted to 2 hours per day (AAP 2001/13, CPS 2010). Children and youth use 4-5 times the recommended amount of technology, with serious and often life threatening consequences (Kaiser Foundation 2010, Active Healthy Kids Canada 2012). Handheld devices (cell phones, tablets, electronic games) have dramatically increased the accessibility and usage of technology, especially by very young children (Common Sense Media, 2013). As a pediatric occupational therapist, I'm calling on parents, teachers and governments to ban the use of all handheld devices for children under the age of 12 years. Following are 10 research-based reasons for this ban. Please visit zonein.ca to view the Zone'in Fact Sheet for referenced research.

    1. Rapid brain growth
    Between 0 and 2 years, infant's brains triple in size, and continue in a state of rapid development to 21 years of age (Christakis 2011). Early brain development is determined by environmental stimuli, or lack thereof. Stimulation to a developing brain caused by overexposure to technologies (cell phones, internet, iPads, TV), has been shown to negatively affect executive functioning and cause attention deficit, cognitive delays, impaired learning, increased impulsivity and decreased ability to self-regulate, e.g. tantrums (Small 2008, Pagini 2010).

    2. Delayed Development
    Technology use restricts movement, which can result in delayed development. One in three children now enter school developmentally delayed, negatively impacting literacy and academic achievement (HELP EDI Maps 2013). Movement enhances attention and learning ability (Ratey 200. Use of technology under the age of 12 years is detrimental to child development and learning (Rowan 2010).

    3. Epidemic Obesity
    TV and video game use correlates with increased obesity (Tremblay 2005). Children who are allowed a device in their bedrooms have 30% increased incidence of obesity (Feng 2011). One in four Canadian, and one in three U.S. children are obese (Tremblay 2011). 30% of children with obesity will develop diabetes, and obese individuals are at higher risk for early stroke and heart attack, gravely shortening life expectancy (Center for Disease Control and Prevention 2010). Largely due to obesity, 21st century children may be the first generation many of whom will not outlive their parents (Professor Andrew Prentice, BBC News 2002).

    4. Sleep Deprivation
    60% of parents do not supervise their child's technology usage, and 75% of children are allowed technology in their bedrooms (Kaiser Foundation 2010). 75% of children aged 9 and 10 years are sleep deprived to the extent that their grades are detrimentally impacted (Boston College 2012).

    5. Mental Illness
    Technology overuse is implicated as a causal factor in rising rates of child depression, anxiety, attachment disorder, attention deficit, autism, bipolar disorder, psychosis and problematic child behavior (Bristol University 2010, Mentzoni 2011, Shin 2011, Liberatore 2011, Robinson 200. One in six Canadian children have a diagnosed mental illness, many of whom are on dangerous psychotropic medication (Waddell 2007).

    6. Aggression
    Violent media content can cause child aggression (Anderson, 2007). Young children are increasingly exposed to rising incidence of physical and sexual violence in today's media. "Grand Theft Auto V" portrays explicit sex, murder, rape, torture and mutilation, as do many movies and TV shows. The U.S. has categorized media violence as a Public Health Risk due to causal impact on child aggression (Huesmann 2007). Media reports increased use of restraints and seclusion rooms with children who exhibit uncontrolled aggression.

    7. Digital dementia
    High speed media content can contribute to attention deficit, as well as decreased concentration and memory, due to the brain pruning neuronal tracks to the frontal cortex (Christakis 2004, Small 200. Children who can't pay attention can't learn.

    8. Addictions
    As parents attach more and more to technology, they are detaching from their children. In the absence of parental attachment, detached children can attach to devices, which can result in addiction (Rowan 2010). One in 11 children aged 8-18 years are addicted to technology (Gentile 2009).

    9. Radiation emission
    In May of 2011, the World Health Organization classified cell phones (and other wireless devices) as a category 2B risk (possible carcinogen) due to radiation emission (WHO 2011). James McNamee with Health Canada in October of 2011 issued a cautionary warning stating "Children are more sensitive to a variety of agents than adults as their brains and immune systems are still developing, so you can't say the risk would be equal for a small adult as for a child." (Globe and Mail 2011). In December, 2013 Dr. Anthony Miller from the University of Toronto's School of Public Health recommend that based on new research, radio frequency exposure should be reclassified as a 2A (probable carcinogen), not a 2B (possible carcinogen). American Academy of Pediatrics requested review of EMF radiation emissions from technology devices, citing three reasons regarding impact on children (AAP 2013).

    10. Unsustainable
    The ways in which children are raised and educated with technology are no longer sustainable (Rowan 2010). Children are our future, but there is no future for children who overuse technology. A team-based approach is necessary and urgent in order to reduce the use of technology by children. Please reference below slide shows on Zone'in Programs Inc. - Children of the New Millennium under "videos" to share with others who are concerned about technology overuse by children.

    Problems - Suffer the Children - 4 minutes
    Solutions - Balanced Technology Management - 7 minutes

    The following Technology Use Guidelines for children and youth were developed by Cris Rowan, pediatric occupational therapist and author of Virtual Child; Dr. Andrew Doan, neuroscientist and author of Hooked on Games; and Dr. Hilarie Cash, Director of reSTART Internet Addiction Recovery Program and author of Video Games and Your Kids, with contribution from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Canadian Pediatric Society in an effort to ensure sustainable futures for all children. (chart in link)


    Debate - Should hand held devices be banned for children under the age of 12. How much time do you let your children on hand held devices (phone, tablet, ect)? How much time do you wish your child spent on these devices?

    ~Bonita~

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    Nope they shouldn't be banned. Parenting decision.

    Time my kids spend...it varies. DD1 is on the spectrum and benefits a lot with her tablet and educational apps. DD2 uses it sparingly. Some days they don't use them or barely use them...some days is a little more (snowed in days for example).
    Mom to Elizabeth (6) and Corinne (4)

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    I would strongly disagree with them being banned. However I think it is a good idea to limit screen time including hand held devices. My girls do use the kindle sometimes, but it is the TV that is more of a temptation. There are some wonderful learning apps on the Kindle that would be a great benefit.

    ~Bonita~

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    Oy.

    Like anything, it's about how you use it. Technology isn't evil and it doesn't cause mental illness or addiction. Things like this just irritate me.

    Yes, if you neglect your children and let little kids play Grand Theft Auto, you're asking for trouble. That's not about exposure to technology, that's about parenting.
    Laurie, mom to:
    Nathaniel ( 10 ) and Juliet ( 6 )




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    While I am not fond of kids having so much exposure to the screens, I am extremely not fond of this much government control. Talk about being restrictive and controlling.
    Aisha

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    She's a pediatric occupational therapist, so she seems the damage these devices are doing to little kids who don't know better. She knows that the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Canadian Society of Pediatrics strongly advise limiting children's exposure in both amount and content, and she knows it's not working. We're raising a new generation that can't handle even a bit of boredom, don't want to watch something that isn't moving or blinking, don't want to listen to anything that doesn't have a soundtrack, and that expects to have constant interaction with everyone they know at all times. That's not good for the children, and it's not good for society in the long term.

    I would absolutely support a ban. The "strong suggestions" aren't working. Parents are using smartphones as babysitters and video games to keep the kids quiet in the car. Little kids at the park should be playing with friends, not smart phones. Kids at lunch recess should be playing active games, not games on the internet. The sad thing is that this goes far beyond a parenting issue. At Weston's last checkup, the hearing test was a video game on a handheld device where you touch the animal on the side making the sound. A freaking doctor's office is putting a game on a handheld device into my child's hands and not much I can do about it except decline the hearing test, which was what I did. Even schools are putting kids in front of technology for longer periods of time than the guidelines suggest! I've argued against tablets in our classrooms but everyone else wants their kids to have the latest & greatest technology. And rather than simple tutorials, the tablets are filled with programs that look & act like video games. It's not an educational game, it's a game, period. You don't just work a math problem and mark the answer, you have to catch the correct number of flying rabbits. Elementary kids, for the most part, do not need technology. It doesn't help them learn, and it can actually inhibit their learning because it inhibits their brain development in important ways. The only kids that technology has been proven to help, are those with a limited set of developmental disabilities, because the technology can be used to supplement their therapies because it's far cheaper than having one-on-one support all day, and it can be adapted to their individual needs far better, easier, and cheaper, than adapting classroom lessons to a dozen children.

    There would have to be a reasonable exception for safety, though. Now that my daughter is riding the bus here & there without an adult, she needs to have a way to stay in touch with us. She has a very basic flip phone, no camera, no games, no internet.
    David Letterman is retiring. Such great memories of watching him over the past thirty-two years!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    I would absolutely support a ban.
    Why is it ok for your way of parenting to be forced on everyone else's children? Would you be in support of it if it went the other way? A law requiring all children spend at least 2 hours a day on technology? Like it or not, it is the way that the world is going and children will need to learn how to be comfortable around technology. Wouldn't you want to be the one who decided what you felt was best for your child?

    ~Bonita~

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    This isn't "a way of parenting." These devices are doing physical, emotional, and sometimes psychological damage to very young children. We've banned letting parents drive around with their kids not in seat belts, we've banned smoking in cars with children, we've banned letting your kids cut school, all of which could be argued as "a way of parenting," but we've banned them because as a society we felt the alternatives were too damaging. And the evidence is mounting, very quickly and very strongly, that these devices and the programs on them are no good for young kids. If we're concerned about protecting the future generation's lives, lungs, and educations enough to ban those things, why aren't we concerned enough about their bodies and brains to ban these handheld devices?
    David Letterman is retiring. Such great memories of watching him over the past thirty-two years!

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    Yep, I'm always the lone wolf on banning smoking in cars even though I think it is awful.

    I am for banning things that can cause immediate harm. Not wearing a seat belt can cause immediate harm.

    Things like this could detriment my daughter's ability to achieve...all it will do is have people saying their kid has a disability.

    There are plenty of things that can cause long term damage. Being a crazy sports parent for one.

    I think getting so involved in everyday decisions is not good. If a child misses so much school, it is neglect and can be investigated. If I let my child stay home one day just to have a fun day when they aren't sick, that is a parenting choice.
    Mom to Elizabeth (6) and Corinne (4)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jessica80 View Post
    Being a crazy sports parent for one.
    I'd be good with banning those, too.
    David Letterman is retiring. Such great memories of watching him over the past thirty-two years!

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