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Thread: Banning hand held devices for children under age 12

  1. #11
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    Well, maybe I'll go for the crazy sports parents

    And pageant moms.

    Just kidding.
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  2. #12
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    And then let's ban soda for kids, and Doritos too.
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    This isn't "a way of parenting." These devices are doing physical, emotional, and sometimes psychological damage to very young children. We've banned letting parents drive around with their kids not in seat belts, we've banned smoking in cars with children, we've banned letting your kids cut school, all of which could be argued as "a way of parenting," but we've banned them because as a society we felt the alternatives were too damaging. And the evidence is mounting, very quickly and very strongly, that these devices and the programs on them are no good for young kids. If we're concerned about protecting the future generation's lives, lungs, and educations enough to ban those things, why aren't we concerned enough about their bodies and brains to ban these handheld devices?
    Completely banning all hand held devices is way over the top and just as unhealthy as over use. Neither you or any one else has any business telling me that I can or can not let my child play on my phone or kindle. It is your "opinion" that a child should have zero access to technology. That is not the prevalent opinion at this time. Even if it was, it is no one else's business. Unless there was hard evidence (there is not) that technology caused tumours in children or some other concrete prove that it was seriously physically harmful it is very offensive to think that you know better than a parent what is best for their child. If you do not want someone else to come in and tell you exactly how to parent your children, then you have no business telling someone else how to parent their child.

    All of that aside, I disagree that a zero tolerance approach to technology is the best answer. A child that goes their entire childhood without learning how to use a phone, computer, tablet, or any technology at all will be at a serious disadvantage in a modern technological world. Today's jobs require a knowledge of technology. Balance is the key here. No technology at all is just as harmful to a child as a child that sits and spends hours a day on technology.

    ~Bonita~

  4. #14
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    I was joking about soda, but that is guaranteed 100% harmful to kids. So why not ban that, really?
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  5. #15
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    Oh my god this futile attempt to prevent everyone from doing something harmful to their kids EVER at the expense of our right to simply and independently parent our children HAS TO STOP.

    STOP IT! Its beyond irritating. Its infuriating. And obnoxious. And arrogant.

    Need i continue?

  6. #16
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    Kim, you must continue, because I'd enjoy a good Kim rant.
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    Completely banning all hand held devices is way over the top and just as unhealthy as over use. Neither you or any one else has any business telling me that I can or can not let my child play on my phone or kindle. It is your "opinion" that a child should have zero access to technology. That is not the prevalent opinion at this time. Even if it was, it is no one else's business. Unless there was hard evidence (there is not) that technology caused tumours in children or some other concrete prove that it was seriously physically harmful it is very offensive to think that you know better than a parent what is best for their child. If you do not want someone else to come in and tell you exactly how to parent your children, then you have no business telling someone else how to parent their child.

    All of that aside, I disagree that a zero tolerance approach to technology is the best answer. A child that goes their entire childhood without learning how to use a phone, computer, tablet, or any technology at all will be at a serious disadvantage in a modern technological world. Today's jobs require a knowledge of technology. Balance is the key here. No technology at all is just as harmful to a child as a child that sits and spends hours a day on technology.
    First of all, it is not just my "opinion" that young children should have zero access to technology. It's been the recommendation of every pediatricians' group in the developed world for the past many years. Not a single pediatricians' group has ever said, "The use of technological devices is a good thing and should be encouraged for all children." Not even close. The only children that technology has been shown to helpful rather than detrimental are those with certain developmental or learning disabilities. The fact is that these devices alter brain development and they alter the child's natural desire to run around & play, learn to entertain themselves, and learn to interact with others. Can "good parenting" counteract all of that? No.

    Children are not going to go their whole childhood without learning that stuff. They're going to go 8 or 10 or 12 years, and no, that will not be a disadvantage at all in their adult lives. There are plenty of adults who went 30 or 40 or 50 years without technology who have had no trouble learning it at an appropriate time in their lives.

    And balance doesn't always mean some of both things. Sometimes balance means introducing something in a way that doesn't disturb the rest of your life, i.e. nothing of it for a while, then a little bit of it, and then a little more, and then finally full access to it. We actually do that with pretty much everything else that we introduce to our children without really thinking about it because there is a natural developmental curve, and we seem to have lost the good sense about this when it comes to technology. Parents simply are not controlling their children's access to these devices despite all the recommendations, the warnings, the advice about how young brains develop, they just want more & more & more technology for their kids. And that is what needs to stop.
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  8. #18
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    But Stacey, most of the issues that they are seeing are resulting from parenting issues.

    1. Not knowing what their child is viewing (parenting issue)
    2. Not monitoring how long they are on it.
    3. Allowing open access in their bedrooms vs. a common area
    4. Not making sure child is getting enough sleep, so either not following through with when they are sleeping and not taking devices away at night.
    5. Obesity because they are not outside. I think this is a big factor in obesity but I also think that bad food choices, general lack of family activities for exercise are also major points too.

    I still think the point is for education. It's not up to society to ban these things...it's up to the parents and their medical professionals to address things properly. If a child is coming to school sleepy everyday that warrants a convo with parents. If a child is obese, it warrants services from their pcp.
    Mom to Elizabeth (6) and Corinne (4)

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    First of all, it is not just my "opinion" that young children should have zero access to technology. It's been the recommendation of every pediatricians' group in the developed world for the past many years. Not a single pediatricians' group has ever said, "The use of technological devices is a good thing and should be encouraged for all children." Not even close. The only children that technology has been shown to helpful rather than detrimental are those with certain developmental or learning disabilities. The fact is that these devices alter brain development and they alter the child's natural desire to run around & play, learn to entertain themselves, and learn to interact with others. Can "good parenting" counteract all of that? No.

    Children are not going to go their whole childhood without learning that stuff. They're going to go 8 or 10 or 12 years, and no, that will not be a disadvantage at all in their adult lives. There are plenty of adults who went 30 or 40 or 50 years without technology who have had no trouble learning it at an appropriate time in their lives.

    And balance doesn't always mean some of both things. Sometimes balance means introducing something in a way that doesn't disturb the rest of your life, i.e. nothing of it for a while, then a little bit of it, and then a little more, and then finally full access to it. We actually do that with pretty much everything else that we introduce to our children without really thinking about it because there is a natural developmental curve, and we seem to have lost the good sense about this when it comes to technology. Parents simply are not controlling their children's access to these devices despite all the recommendations, the warnings, the advice about how young brains develop, they just want more & more & more technology for their kids. And that is what needs to stop.
    Show me the study that says that children should have zero access to technology until past age 12.

    There are PLENTY of older people that feel at a huge disadvantage to the younger generation in the work place because they did not grow up with and learn to use computers. Both my In Law, parents, pastor and his wife, and just about anyone I know of that age.

    It is 100% a personal preference and no one at all has any business governing it. This is the land of the Free. Not the land where every single aspect of life is dictated. The idea that anyone at all thinks that this is reasonable is a little out of scope for me. I mean how would you do it? Have video cameras in every home watching every moment of a childs life reporting to some agency that decided if a parent is breaking any rules?

    ~Bonita~

  10. #20
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    We LOVE technology in this house, we would not be happy with a ban (not sure government should be banning things like this that do not cause damage in most cases) All four of our children have Kindle Fires (all my girls bought their own, and one gave the brother her old one when she bought a new one) I get a report on used of them every week. Last week our kids used their kindles for a total of 42 hours combined. 40 of those hours were spent reading books. I LOVE it, they can get onto our library system website, find books in their reading levels and download them, any time of day, and time of the week. Even the 4 year old can pick out books, he loves looking at the library site (I love that I will never have late fees again or worry about losing books)
    Responsible parents set boundaries for everything, technology included.
    AT the school I teach at, I have never seen a child not go play on recess. There are kids that will take books out to read, but that has always happened (I spent many hours at school reading on the playground)

    Stacie, there are many studies that show how technology is positively impacting classrooms. As teachers, we know we are preparing kids for jobs that may not exist yet. We have to teach them how to learn, instead of rote memorization.
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