Can a school force girls to take pregnancy tests?

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Alissa_Sal's picture
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Can a school force girls to take pregnancy tests?

Charter School Mandates Pregnancy Tests for Students Suspected of Being Pregnant

A Louisiana charter school is in the news this week for its policy of mandating pregnancy tests for female students if there are any suspicions that the girls are pregnant. And then kicks out anyone who is pregnant.

Dehli Charter School in Dehli, La., has 600 students in grades k-12 and presents its pregnancy policy as an effort to maintain its high standard for student character.

In its policy book, Dehli Charter School states: The school reserves the right to require any female student to take a pregnancy test to confirm whether or not the suspected student is in fact pregnant. The school further reserves the right to refer the student to a physician of its choice. If the test indicates that the student is pregnant, the student will not be permitted to attend classes on the campus of Dehli Charter School.

The policy goes on to say that the student can purchase a homeschooling program if she wishes to continue her education.

So what happens if a student refuses to take a pregnancy test?

The policy states, Any student who is suspected of being pregnant and refuses to submit to a pregnancy test shall be treated as a pregnant student and will be offered home study opportunities.

Among the many criticisms of this policy, including what appear to be blatant violations of federal law: The policy does not address male students who have premarital sex that results in a pregnancy.

The pregnancy policy violates the rights of every girl at Delhi Charter School, said Marjorie R. Esman, executive director of the ACLU of Louisiana. Every girl is at risk of being subject to intrusive medical testing, and possibly forced out of school, for reasons that have nothing to do with her education.

The right to attend school and to participate fully in activities cannot be denied simply because a student is, or may be, pregnant, said Galen Sherwin of the ACLUs Womens Rights Project. Pregnancy is not a disease, and schools may not treat it that way. The administrators of Delhi Charter School should be ashamed that they seek to deprive students of the benefits of going to school every day.

The ACLU has asked the school to end the policy. In a statement issued Monday, the ACLU said: [INDENT]Today, the ACLU of Louisiana and the ACLU Womens Rights Project asked Delhi Charter School to immediately suspend this discriminatory and illegal policy.

The policys complete disregard for Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the federal law that prohibits sex discrimination in federally funded education programs and activities, is astonishing. Title IX and its regulations explicitly mandate that schools cannot exclude any student from an education program or activity, including any class or extracurricular activity, on the basis of such students pregnancy, childbirth, false pregnancy, termination of pregnancy or recovery therefrom.

Besides violating Title IX, the policy is also in violation of the Constitutions due process right to procreate, and equal protection: it treats female students differently from male students and relies on archaic stereotypes linked to sex and pregnancy.

Approximately 70 percent of teen girls who give birth leave school, due in part to illegal discrimination. Schools should be supporting pregnant and parenting teens that face numerous barriers to completing their education, not illegally excluding them from school. The ACLUs Womens Rights Project protects the rights of pregnant and parenting teens through advocacy, education, and litigation, working to combat the push-out of pregnant and parenting teens from school.
[/INDENT]
Looking over the schools lengthy policy handbook, the school also permits corporal punishment . One of the considerations of whether and how to use physical discipline on students is: The students ability to bear the punishment.

Thoughts? Can a school force girls to take pregnancy tests? Can they kick her out for being pregnant, or refusing to take the test? Also, is it their business to "refer her to a physician of their choice?" (Not sure if that means she has to go to their physician, or if they can just suggest one....)

mom3girls's picture
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I cannot think of a good reason that would make them want to test? I know charter schools have some different rules in place then a typical public school, but they should only be there to deal with distractions in the classroom.

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"mom3girls" wrote:

I cannot think of a good reason that would make them want to test? I know charter schools have some different rules in place then a typical public school, but they should only be there to deal with distractions in the classroom.

I don't think the rules can violate state or federal law, though.

This is just insane! I think it would be against possibly the 4th amendment and definitely the 14th amendment. Just to illustrate: What happens to the girl who gets pregnant the end of May, finds out in June, has an abortion a week later. She wouldn't be required to disclose that.

Spacers's picture
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"ethanwinfield" wrote:

I don't think the rules can violate state or federal law, though.

This is just insane! I think it would be against possibly the 4th amendment and definitely the 14th amendment. Just to illustrate: What happens to the girl who gets pregnant the end of May, finds out in June, has an abortion a week later. She wouldn't be required to disclose that.

Ditto this. To answer the OP: no, no, and no.

wlillie's picture
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It doesn't say anything about purchasing the home study. It just says while she's pregnant (or refuses to test) she has to do her work at home and has to maintain the high academic standards to be promoted. And that if they don't want to do the work, they will be counseled to seek other educational opportunities.

You guys don't think the teenage pregnancy rate will drop with a policy like this in place? Because my cousin got pregant when she shouldn't have and I had to hide her feed because about a quarter of the kids commenting on her facebook were also teenage parents. Both male and female. It's treated like it's not a big deal in the school she went to. It was actually celebrated by a few of the kids (not high school graduates) when they got a positive pregnancy test.

It's not the same for males. Men can't have babies. Period. So they can't walk around school with the attitude that it's easy peasy or actually something to be proud of in the same way a high school girl does.

People joke about "not drinking the water" but in high school, once a notion is considered cool (or whatever the term is now), there is no stopping it. Just like a contagious disease. However, if you make the consequences losing the social aspect of school and being stuck at home by yourself and pregnant, I bet the rate would drop.

I'm sorry. I think it's a great incentive to be more careful.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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Just to clarify, this is a public school right? Private schools do have the option of putting in their policy book rules about conduct. If those rules are violated, then the student is no longer able to attend. However these schools are not public. They are private schools that cost a lot of money. If you wish to go there you have to sign a contract first. If you then break the agreement (Such as getting pg) then you are kicked out. There is no one forcing you to go to said school.

Now if this is a public school that you are zoned for (My kids would be zoned for a charter school. No other public option), then I would feel differently.

Alissa_Sal's picture
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"wlillie" wrote:

It doesn't say anything about purchasing the home study. It just says while she's pregnant (or refuses to test) she has to do her work at home and has to maintain the high academic standards to be promoted. And that if they don't want to do the work, they will be counseled to seek other educational opportunities.

You guys don't think the teenage pregnancy rate will drop with a policy like this in place? Because my cousin got pregant when she shouldn't have and I had to hide her feed because about a quarter of the kids commenting on her facebook were also teenage parents. Both male and female. It's treated like it's not a big deal in the school she went to. It was actually celebrated by a few of the kids (not high school graduates) when they got a positive pregnancy test.

It's not the same for males. Men can't have babies. Period. So they can't walk around school with the attitude that it's easy peasy or actually something to be proud of in the same way a high school girl does.

People joke about "not drinking the water" but in high school, once a notion is considered cool (or whatever the term is now), there is no stopping it. Just like a contagious disease. However, if you make the consequences losing the social aspect of school and being stuck at home by yourself and pregnant, I bet the rate would drop.

I'm sorry. I think it's a great incentive to be more careful.

I don't think a policy like this is going to discourage teenagers from having sex and getting pregnant. I don't think there's a force on earth that can successfully stop teenagers from having sex and getting pregnant, except maybe comprehensive sex education and accessible birth control. It may encourage them to have more abortions though....

Alissa_Sal's picture
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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

Just to clarify, this is a public school right? Private schools do have the option of putting in their policy book rules about conduct. If those rules are violated, then the student is no longer able to attend. However these schools are not public. They are private schools that cost a lot of money. If you wish to go there you have to sign a contract first. If you then break the agreement (Such as getting pg) then you are kicked out. There is no one forcing you to go to said school.

Now if this is a public school that you are zoned for (My kids would be zoned for a charter school. No other public option), then I would feel differently.

Charter schools are funded with public money aren't they? I have to think they would have to follow at least most of the same general rules as regular public schools if they want to keep their funding.

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

Just to clarify, this is a public school right? Private schools do have the option of putting in their policy book rules about conduct. If those rules are violated, then the student is no longer able to attend. However these schools are not public. They are private schools that cost a lot of money. If you wish to go there you have to sign a contract first. If you then break the agreement (Such as getting pg) then you are kicked out. There is no one forcing you to go to said school.

Now if this is a public school that you are zoned for (My kids would be zoned for a charter school. No other public option), then I would feel differently.

It's a charter school. A public school had to issue them a charter which they need to renew every so often.

So becuase no one is forcing you to go to that school, they can invade your privacy? Students (and teachers) still have rights even while at school. Granted some are restricted (freedom of speech, search and seizure) but this really crosses the line.

Alissa_Sal's picture
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Also, what about medical privacy, and the rights of the parents to procure the medical care for their kids that they see fit?

Finally, kicking pregnant girls out of school seems like a great way to keep kids in a cycle of low education, poverty, and public assistance.

wlillie's picture
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"Alissa_Sal" wrote:

I don't think a policy like this is going to discourage teenagers from having sex and getting pregnant. I don't think there's a force on earth that can successfully stop teenagers from having sex and getting pregnant, except maybe comprehensive sex education and accessible birth control. It may encourage them to have more abortions though....

OK. In Louisiana, birth control has been free for anyone who is low-income for quite a few years. And it's promoted in not only high schools, but also middle schools. There is still a high rate of teen pregnancy and for some of them, it's defintiely done on purpose. If you make it less cool, the rate *will* drop. I can't imagine it will stop them from having sex (I agree 100% nothing the school can do will stop that), but the pregnancy rate will drop because there are very few sexually active teenagers who want to get cut off from the social scene of high school.

eta-they aren't kicked out. They do homestudy.

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"wlillie" wrote:

It doesn't say anything about purchasing the home study. It just says while she's pregnant (or refuses to test) she has to do her work at home and has to maintain the high academic standards to be promoted. And that if they don't want to do the work, they will be counseled to seek other educational opportunities.

You guys don't think the teenage pregnancy rate will drop with a policy like this in place? Because my cousin got pregant when she shouldn't have and I had to hide her feed because about a quarter of the kids commenting on her facebook were also teenage parents. Both male and female. It's treated like it's not a big deal in the school she went to. It was actually celebrated by a few of the kids (not high school graduates) when they got a positive pregnancy test.

I'll bet teen pregnancy rates would drop if we required all females to have Norplant during their teen years (13 - 19). Should we invade their privacy even more?

It's not the same for males. Men can't have babies. Period. So they can't walk around school with the attitude that it's easy peasy or actually something to be proud of in the same way a high school girl does.

Why shouldn't they have similar consequences? "If a female student names a male student as the parent or it is suspected a male student has fathered a child, he will be kicked out of the school because it does not fit with the goals of school."

Not all girls view it as something to be proud of and some boys do view it as something to be proud of. In my life I've never met anyone - teen or older - who thought it would be easy peasy. Most were very confused and scared. Their motives for intentional pregnancy wasn't "status."

People joke about "not drinking the water" but in high school, once a notion is considered cool (or whatever the term is now), there is no stopping it. Just like a contagious disease. However, if you make the consequences losing the social aspect of school and being stuck at home by yourself and pregnant, I bet the rate would drop.

I'll take that bet. The pregnancy rate has dropped over the past 20 years. Back in the day, pregnant girls did have to leave school and either go on independent study or a different school setting. Again, not my experience about the notion of pregnancy becoming a contagious disease. My former students were really judgmental and thought the girl was stupid. She should have graduated from high school in 2010. Her child will turn 5 this November. Yep, she was 4 months pregnant when she finished 8th grade.

The percentage of teens who have had sex has also declined since 1995. The use of protection is up. Something is being done right and it isn't because teens are forced to submit to a pregnancy test.

I'm sorry. I think it's a great incentive to be more careful.

I know the military drug tests. Has that led to a zero rate of drug-related discharges? Has that led to miliatary personnel being "more careful" in their drug use?

Many couples think their families are complete. Years later the couple finds themselves having another child. It wasn't a matter of "carelessness," or if it was, why wouldn't the idea of being stuck at home or delaying retirement plans cause the couple to be more careful?

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"wlillie" wrote:

OK. In Louisiana, birth control has been free for anyone who is low-income for quite a few years. And it's promoted in not only high schools, but also middle schools. There is still a high rate of teen pregnancy and for some of them, it's defintiely done on purpose. If you make it less cool, the rate *will* drop. I can't imagine it will stop them from having sex (I agree 100% nothing the school can do will stop that), but the pregnancy rate will drop because there are very few sexually active teenagers who want to get cut off from the social scene of high school.

eta-they aren't kicked out. They do homestudy.

But they aren't getting cut off from the social scene of high school. A public school can't refuse them access due solely to pregnancy. In fact, as disabled per the ADA, they would qualify for a 504 plan albeit temporarily. Yes, a private or charter school may have the option of having them leave, a public school can't.

eta - Lousiana isn't even in the top 10 for highest teen pregnancy rates.

I would like to see the rate of teen pregnancy at that charter school. It may be much ado about nothing.

Alissa_Sal's picture
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"wlillie" wrote:

OK. In Louisiana, birth control has been free for anyone who is low-income for quite a few years. And it's promoted in not only high schools, but also middle schools. There is still a high rate of teen pregnancy and for some of them, it's defintiely done on purpose. If you make it less cool, the rate *will* drop. I can't imagine it will stop them from having sex (I agree 100% nothing the school can do will stop that), but the pregnancy rate will drop because there are very few sexually active teenagers who want to get cut off from the social scene of high school.

eta-they aren't kicked out. They do homestudy.

But what about the girls that don't get pregnant on purpose? Should their education suffer too?

I think homestudy can be okay, if the kid has the right resources in place (like a parent dedicated to homeschooling) but if we're talking about an average teenager with working parents that aren't there to make sure they are doing their program, how many of them will blow it off and end up watching day time TV instead? I tried taking some online classes when I was older than these kids (like 22) and wasn't disciplined enough to stay on top of them, and I have always been a good student in a classroom setting.

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"Alissa_Sal" wrote:

Charter schools are funded with public money aren't they? I have to think they would have to follow at least most of the same general rules as regular public schools if they want to keep their funding.

"ethanwinfield" wrote:

It's a charter school. A public school had to issue them a charter which they need to renew every so often.

So becuase no one is forcing you to go to that school, they can invade your privacy? Students (and teachers) still have rights even while at school. Granted some are restricted (freedom of speech, search and seizure) but this really crosses the line.

I think a public school would need to just deal with the teen pregnancy. I remember when I was in 7th grade one of my class mates got pg and went on to have the baby (gave it up for adoption). They brought her by ambulance to our Spanish Regence exam.

I private school would have more leeway to make and enforce whatever rules they deemed fit. I know many people who send their child to private religious schools in both NY and in the South and all would expel a teen for becoming pregnant.

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If it is a private school, then they can make whatever rules they like (and people can attend or depend on how they feel about those rules).

If it is public school, then they can not deny a girl's access to education.

(We don't have charter schools here, so I'm not sure where they fit in).

There are several prestigious private schools in my area and I can't imagine a pregnant teen being allowed to continue at any of them.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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"Alissa_Sal" wrote:

But what about the girls that don't get pregnant on purpose? Should their education suffer too?

I think homestudy can be okay, if the kid has the right resources in place (like a parent dedicated to homeschooling) but if we're talking about an average teenager with working parents that aren't there to make sure they are doing their program, how many of them will blow it off and end up watching day time TV instead? I tried taking some online classes when I was older than these kids (like 22) and wasn't disciplined enough to stay on top of them, and I have always been a good student in a classroom setting.

I wanted to add to my last post that in the case of rape a teen would not be expelled. They are not being punished for the pregnancy, but for having sex.

In most States there is now a K12 program. It is a public virtual homeschool. You have a Public school teacher that is responsible for you. There are on-line classes and a lot of the work is done on line. It is at your grade level. I have heard from many that it is a very good curriculum. You are not able to fall behind because there is a real live certified teacher following you. Many thousands of students use this program every year. It is very much a public education. The difference is that it happens in the students home.

K12 | Online Public School, Online High School, Online Private School, Homeschooling, and Online Courses options

mom3girls's picture
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I may be wrong here but I do believe that to attend charter schools parents and students have to sign contracts. My friends son attends one and there are pretty high expectations of what he and his parents will do for him to continue going there.
There may be a clause in the contract about the pregnancy testing.

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"mom3girls" wrote:

I may be wrong here but I do believe that to attend charter schools parents and students have to sign contracts. My friends son attends one and there are pretty high expectations of what he and his parents will do for him to continue going there.
There may be a clause in the contract about the pregnancy testing.

That's the issue - the clause in the agreement.

Just because they put it in doesn't mean it will hold up legally. They could also put in there that students will be stripped searched if the school personnel suspects drug use or possession of drugs. Not gonna happen.

I can see it now: a jealous girl starts a rumor that so-and-so is pregnant. School has her tested. Students all gossip that they tested her. Poor girl is a virgin and now has a reputation. Then what?

Spacers's picture
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Some interesting statistics I found in the comments of another article:

Delhi, LA, is just off Interstate 20, west of Vicksburg. It is the home of 2900 people; 42% White and 57% Black. Delhi has two high schools.
Delhi High School has 177 students, is 97% Black and 2% White. It has 88% of the students receiving free/reduced lunches, a good indicator of their families' income.
Delhi Charter School, on the other hand, has 547 students (K-12), is 10% Black and 87% White. It has 41% free/reduced lunch students.

In 2008, according to the last year of released statistics currently with available data from the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals, 15- to 17-year-old African-Americans saw a teen birth rate of 45.2 to 17.8 in the white community.

Sounds like racism to me. I wonder when this policy was put into place, when the school was started, or after a couple of girls got pregnant & there was nothing they could legally do to kick them out?

And just for fun, here's the actual letter the ACLU sent to school officials outlining the five legal arguments against this policy. http://www.aclu.org/files/assets/delhicharterschool_pregnancypolicy_080612.pdf

mom3girls's picture
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"ethanwinfield" wrote:

That's the issue - the clause in the agreement.

Just because they put it in doesn't mean it will hold up legally. They could also put in there that students will be stripped searched if the school personnel suspects drug use or possession of drugs. Not gonna happen.

I can see it now: a jealous girl starts a rumor that so-and-so is pregnant. School has her tested. Students all gossip that they tested her. Poor girl is a virgin and now has a reputation. Then what?

But if the parents and the students signed a contract then the school would have legal ground? Again, I dont agree with the testing, but if you are a parent that would not want your child forced into pregnancy testing then maybe this charter school would not be the right school

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"mom3girls" wrote:

But if the parents and the students signed a contract then the school would have legal ground? Again, I dont agree with the testing, but if you are a parent that would not want your child forced into pregnancy testing then maybe this charter school would not be the right school

You can't enter into a contract that violates the law and expect it to be enforced/ hold up to challenge.

Totally not the same thing, but to illistrate, one of the apartments I lived in during college put something in the lease that was against CA law. (Can't remember now what it was.) When I moved out they mentioned it. I told them good luck with that. Even though I signed the lease, they couldn't enforce that part.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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"mom3girls" wrote:

I may be wrong here but I do believe that to attend charter schools parents and students have to sign contracts. My friends son attends one and there are pretty high expectations of what he and his parents will do for him to continue going there.

I think this would vary greatly by area.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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"ethanwinfield" wrote:

You can't enter into a contract that violates the law and expect it to be enforced/ hold up to challenge.

Which law was violated exactly? (Not being snarky, just wondering)

ETA - I went back and re-read Stacy's post. I do think a public school would have to deal with the situation. A private school would not as long as it was in the rules before hand and the students/parents signed it. I do not believe it to be discriminatory against woman do to boys would also be expelled if it was proven they engaged in similar acts.

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"Spacers" wrote:

Some interesting statistics I found in the comments of another article:

Sounds like racism to me. I wonder when this policy was put into place, when the school was started, or after a couple of girls got pregnant & there was nothing they could legally do to kick them out?

And just for fun, here's the actual letter the ACLU sent to school officials outlining the five legal arguments against this policy. http://www.aclu.org/files/assets/delhicharterschool_pregnancypolicy_080612.pdf

Thanks for the link. Sound pretty clear. Charter schools receive federal funding. Title IX seems pretty clear:

Discrimination Against Pregnant Students (Section 106.40)
Schools are prohibited from discriminating against pregnant students based upon their marital status and cannot discriminate against a student because of childbirth, false pregnancy, or recovery from these conditions.

A school is permitted to require a doctor's certificate from a pregnant student only if the school imposes the same requirement upon all other students with physical or emotional conditions requiring a physician's care.

Participation in special schools or programs reserved or designed for pregnant or parenting students must be completely voluntary on the part of the student. Such programs or schools must be comparable to programs and schools offered to non-pregnant students.

Schools must treat pregnancy as they treat other medical conditions. Health plans, medical benefits, and related services are to be provided to pregnant students in the same manner as services are provided to students with "other temporary disabilities."

A pregnant student may be granted a leave of absence for as long as it is deemed medically necessary and at the conclusion of her leave must be allowed to resume the status she held when the leave began.

Spacers's picture
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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I do not believe it to be discriminatory against woman do to boys would also be expelled if it was proven they engaged in similar acts.

No, boys do not face the same discipline. There is nothing in the "pregnancy policy" about any consequences if a boy is proven to have impregnated a girl.

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I wanted to add to my last post that in the case of rape a teen would not be expelled. They are not being punished for the pregnancy, but for having sex.

There is no exemption for rape, so the student is in fact being punished for the pregnancy itself. Students who have sex willy-nilly but who use birth control properly (or are just lucky) don't face the same punishment.

The pregnancy policy is stated word for word (with the exception of a brief introduction about character development) in the ACLU letter to which I linked above.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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"Spacers" wrote:

No, boys do not face the same discipline. There is nothing in the "pregnancy policy" about any consequences if a boy is proven to have impregnated a girl.

There is no exemption for rape, so the student is in fact being punished for the pregnancy itself. Students who have sex willy-nilly but who use birth control properly (or are just lucky) don't face the same punishment.

The pregnancy policy is stated word for word (with the exception of a brief introduction about character development) in the ACLU letter to which I linked above.

Sorry, I was not referring to the OP, but the private schools I had previously mentioned.

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I think it's gross. It's not the school's business (whether private or public) to force their students to have pregnancy tests and to submit to medical care.

Ick.

Alissa_Sal's picture
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"Spacers" wrote:

Some interesting statistics I found in the comments of another article:

Sounds like racism to me. I wonder when this policy was put into place, when the school was started, or after a couple of girls got pregnant & there was nothing they could legally do to kick them out?

And just for fun, here's the actual letter the ACLU sent to school officials outlining the five legal arguments against this policy. http://www.aclu.org/files/assets/delhicharterschool_pregnancypolicy_080612.pdf

I'm sorry, I'm not totally following the racism argument. Are you saying that the school is hoping black girls get pregnant so they can kick them out or something? That seems pretty nefarious....

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I think a public school would need to just deal with the teen pregnancy. I remember when I was in 7th grade one of my class mates got pg and went on to have the baby (gave it up for adoption). They brought her by ambulance to our Spanish Regence exam.

I private school would have more leeway to make and enforce whatever rules they deemed fit. I know many people who send their child to private religious schools in both NY and in the South and all would expel a teen for becoming pregnant.

LOTS of public schools have onsite daycare for the babies to keep girls from leaving school.

wlillie's picture
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But why do we have a breastfeeding week and encourage people to breastfeed in public? Why do we have Kiss-ins at Chick Fil A? It's becasue we want to make a behavior that is not common acceptable (and other things too ;)). So when you see all of these teenage girls walking around pregnant, it makes the reaction everyone, including other teenagers, less strong to the unwanted result of teenage pregnancy.

There are a lot of people I know who don't do drugs that otherwise would if the military didn't test for them. My dh would probably smoke pot if he didn't know how strongly the AF feels about it. The testing definitely keeps a *LOT* of people from trying out new drugs and there are literally hundreds of people I've met who admit freely to enjoying drugs before they joined. I bet the numbers are significantly lower for us if you test every civilian and every military person for any illegal substance.

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I think if there is a need to have such a privacy invading policy in place, it seems like there are much larger issues here. I haven't read to what extent pregnancy is an issue or if this is just a 'incase' kind of policy.

I personally like the homeschooling options we have available, but I don't feel like every child or every parent is suitable for homeschooling or doing any sort of home education. Forcing a child to be homeschooled might be setting them up to drop out or get in more trouble at home. Also, they may resort to feeling like instead of getting their education, they need to find a full time job to support coming baby, which could happen anyway but perhaps outside of school hours. I just feel nervous for a child who is being forced to be homeschooled.

Public schools often times provide daycares. I don't really know what kind of charter this is and how far they can go to regulate these things since they are afterall publicly funded. I can see why they'd want to try to discourage teen pregnancy but I'm not sure this is the best way to go about it. How about a stronger emphasis on prevention, extracurricular activities, mentorships etc. if indeed these are legitimate issues and try to solve the issue rather than hiding the girls or sweeping them away from view.

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"wlillie" wrote:

But why do we have a breastfeeding week and encourage people to breastfeed in public? Why do we have Kiss-ins at Chick Fil A? It's becasue we want to make a behavior that is not common acceptable (and other things too ;)). So when you see all of these teenage girls walking around pregnant, it makes the reaction everyone, including other teenagers, less strong to the unwanted result of teenage pregnancy.

There is no need for a breastfeeding week at a high school. Just like employers (in CA, at least) must provide a private area for pumping during work hours (it can NOT be a bathroom), a student would be afforded the same due to the ADA.

Breastfeeding events in public usually stem from a business not understanding the law and asking a woman to leave. In CA, any public place the woman has a right to be, she has the right to breastfeed.

There are a lot of people I know who don't do drugs that otherwise would if the military didn't test for them. My dh would probably smoke pot if he didn't know how strongly the AF feels about it. The testing definitely keeps a *LOT* of people from trying out new drugs and there are literally hundreds of people I've met who admit freely to enjoying drugs before they joined. I bet the numbers are significantly lower for us if you test every civilian and every military person for any illegal substance.

It still doesn't prevent 100%.

The school we are talking about is a K-12. 547 students cover 13 grades...I don't know the exact break-down, but let's just go with 42 per grade level. Perhaps they taper off in 9 - 12 or perhaps they increase. Let's use latter and say there are 50 per grade level in 9 - 12. That's a total of 200 HS students at the school, assuming half are female, that is 100. The percent of teen pregnancies in Richland Parish is approximate 8%. Statistically, we would be talking about 8 students. Since it's a charter school, these students have families that are pretty involved. One of the factors that lowers the risk of teen pregnancy. 87% of the students are white. The teen pregnancy rate among whites, is only about 4 percent.

Is it really necessary to enact a policy that may prevent 4 - 8 pregnancies, when they can look to preventative measures rather than reactive. Education and mentoring could go a lot further. As a parent do you plan on just waiting until you suspect drug use or pregnancy? Or do you plan on having conversations along the way about the these things to prevent it from happening?

http://www.delhicharterschool.org/www/dcscharter/site/hosting/Delhi_Charter_School_Policy_Manual.html
I wasn't able to use the find/search feature, but in reading through it, the only mention of drug testing has to do with extra-curricular activities. If you want to participate in after school sports, for example, there is mandatory drug testing.

They do have a locker/personal effects search policy and a policy regarding being search/questioned by LE. So if a teacher suspects drug use, the student's stuff and locker, desk, etc. can be searched through, but they don't force the student to submit to a drug test. You know the rate of drug use among HS students is much higher than teen pregnancy?

They also have a homeless student policy - they will provide a "free, appropriate public education." Even though this a charter school, they have to follow the laws set forth by Title IX. Based on their policies, they are picking and choosing which of those laws they want to follow.

wlillie's picture
Joined: 09/17/07
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Joined: 04/12/03
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"wlillie" wrote:

La. charter school changing pregnancy policy - KPLC 7 News, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Thanks for the update!

Delhi Charter School board chairman Albert Christman said Wednesday that officials didn't know the policy was illegal and are changing it. The American Civil Liberties Union had threatened to sue over the policy, claiming it violated Title IX of the 1972 federal education law. That's the part that requires equal opportunities for both sexes.