CT family sues over school's ebola quarantine for daughter

37 posts / 0 new
Last post
MissyJ's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 months 1 week ago
Joined: 01/31/02
Posts: 3289
CT family sues over school's ebola quarantine for daughter

Here is a spinoff of the other Ebola Quarantine thread:
Do you agree with the quarantine or think the family has a case? Would your answer change if this was your child's school?

[h=1]Connecticut Family Sues Over School's Ebola Fears[/h]

The father of a Connecticut third-grader filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday saying his daughter has been unfairly barred from school amid fears she may have been exposed to the Ebola virus while in Africa.

Ikeoluwa Opayemi and her family, who live in Milford, visited Nigeria for a family wedding from Oct. 2-13, according to the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in New Haven. The suit is seeking damages under the Americans with Disabilities Act, asserting that Ikeoluwa is being discriminated against because of a "perceived impairment."

When the girl tried to return to the Meadowside Elementary School, she was told by Dr. Dennis McBride, the school district's health director, that she would have to stay home until Nov. 3 "due to concern from certain parents and teachers that she could transmit Ebola to other children," according to the lawsuit. The virus has a three-week incubation period.

Messages seeking comment were left Tuesday for McBride and School Superintendent Elizabeth Feser.

Andrew Doba, a spokesman for Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, said the decision did not come from the state's health commissioner, who has been given the power to quarantine anyone she feels may pose an Ebola risk.

"This was a decision by the town's public health official," he said. "The state did not play a role in making this determination, and this family is not under any quarantine orders."

The family did not travel to any of the three West African nations associated with the current Ebola outbreak ? Guinea, Sierra Leone or Liberia. There have been no diagnosed cases of Ebola in Nigeria since Aug. 31, according to the lawsuit.

"Based on the best available objective and medical evidence, Ikeoluwa Opayemi did not have Ebola, had not experienced any symptoms associated with Ebola, and, according to an examination by her pediatrician, her health is fine and there is no reason why she should not be permitted to go to school," attorney Gary Phelan wrote in the lawsuit.

Phelan said Tuesday night that forcing the girl to stay away from school is "a blatant violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act," which protects not only someone who has a disability, but also someone who is perceived to have one.

"One of the reasons the parents filed the lawsuit was to set the record straight with all the rumors in the city about their daughter," he said. "Hopefully this will at least stop the rumors and the stereotypes and the myths surrounding the Ebola fears. This school had the opportunity to do something about it and chose not to. They took the easy way out."

Ikeoluwa's father, Stephen Opayemi, volunteered to have the family screened for Ebola, or have the school nurse monitor her temperature. He said he was instead told by Feser during a meeting with school officials that if Ikeoluwa tried to go to Meadowside Elementary on Oct. 20, she would order her to be removed from the school by the police.

"Dr. McBride stated that although the risk of infection with Ikeoluwa might be minor, the primary reason for his decision that she be quarantined at home for 21 days was due to the rumors, panic and climate at Meadowside Elementary School," according to the lawsuit.

Stephen Opayemi is seeking an order allowing his daughter to return to school and unspecified monetary damages.

KimPossible's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 hours ago
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3475

I'm sure there is a very legal answer to whether they truly have a case to sue or not. I don't know enough about laws and what power town officials really have when it comes to this kind of thing to know if what they did was truly legal or not. I'll leave it up to the lawyers and courts to figure that one out.

I do think its dumb that she can't go to school. No, that would not change if she was going to my kids' school. She didn't even go to a country that has any current ebola cases. Even if a little natural anxiety kicked in...I'm a rational person and know that the whole thing is stupid and I would be able to overcome that anxiety in the name of logic and sanity.

I really do not like how officials feed and validate the hysteria by complying with these parents' wishes. Its just like that teacher here in Maine who went to Dallas.

MissyJ's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 months 1 week ago
Joined: 01/31/02
Posts: 3289

My answer could possibly change if the family had visited a country that is actively considered by WHO to be in high epidemic stage. Given that Nigeria has not had ANY ebola cases diagnosed since the end of August, however, I do believe that the family has a case.

I would also point out that neither the CDC or WHO have placed travel restrictions or a mandatory quarantine for travelers. The child is also not restricted (unless it has been reported elsewhere) from participating in community sports, visiting the library, local park, etc.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

It is a state school and they have the duty to protect the children... missing 20 days of school isn't a big deal.. and I do not think it has anything to do with the disabilities act.. disabilities are NOT contagious.

However I do not think they should have banned her.. I think the CDC hasn't given out enough info for people to feel safe. ALSO the end of Aug was not very long.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

This sounds a lot like the case I posted about earlier from here locally. I am not sure how the ADA applies, however I do think they probably have a defamation of character case. Children this age can be very mean, and the stigmatization from this could follow her for the rest of her life. Also, I do not believe a public school can bar a student for no reason, and they do not have one. There is zero chance that she would have come in contact with the disease.

I would have no issue coming up to this child and having one of my children give her a hug. There is no chance that she has Ebola and is being treated poorly for no reason.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

"Rivergallery" wrote:

missing 20 days of school isn't a big deal..

I would strongly disagree with this.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I would strongly disagree with this.

I missed 50 days of school as a freshman.. I think that in the LONG run it truely is not a big issue.. and that the staff at the school can accomodate the child just fine for less than 3 weeks (20days-weekends).. she would actually only miss approx 16 days max.

Not to mention it is still be beginning of the year.. plenty of time to catch up if she falls behind etc.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

In a school setting, when you miss material the class moves on without you. 3 weeks is enough time in 3rd grade to miss learning multiplication. Yes, a parent could work really hard at home to make up the material, but I child that is already struggling can get so far behind that they never catch back up again. Sure, there are some kids that it would be ok, but there are plenty more that would really struggle with missing that much class time.

The emotional stigma of being labelled is something that also would follow a child for a long time. I remember when a girl in my class at school got lice. It really hurt her emotionally how the other kids treated her when she came back to school afterwards.

Offline
Last seen: 3 months 4 weeks ago
Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3348

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I would strongly disagree with this.

I agree. That's a lot of days. Missing a week (5 days) can mess a kid up even in third grade, but multiple consecutive weeks? And then having everyone thinking you have this horrible disease? It's a huge challenge academically and socially.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

Wonder how long she already missed.. Parents didn't think it was that big of a deal when they went to Africa during the school year.

I do know 5 days in a school week,.. but there are 7 in a calendar week.. Ebola quarantine is up to 20 days.. that is about 16ish school days.

If she is treated badly for missing school or made fun of etc.. there are deeper issues of bullying etc that have NOTHING to do with academics etc.

I do understand missing school.. I do think if the TEACHERS worked with the girl... I even had teachers come to my home.. That it really wouldn't be a big issue.

So say she misses learning long division because the teachers can't catch her up.... say she gets held back a grade.... is it really that big of an issue in the long run?

On the other hand... if she HAD contracted Ebola... and others caught it and spread it.. without knowing..

Would we rather one girl miss 16 days of school or have to deal with an epidemic..... I think that is the thoughts on the state leaders... school officials etc.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

"Rivergallery" wrote:

say she gets held back a grade.... is it really that big of an issue in the long run?

If there was a real danger of a child having Ebola, then I believe the risk would be worth it. However, a child is not contagious without a fever and without bodily fluids. In a school setting, you should never touch the bodily fluids of a child. The practically zero chance of this child spreading Ebola is not worth the educational, social, and emotional well being of the child.

Again, if there was a realistic chance of this child being infected that would be one thing, but that is not the case. To say that there would be no consequences or that the consequences don't matter, really doesn't really describe the situation.

Offline
Last seen: 3 months 4 weeks ago
Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3348

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

If there was a real danger of a child having Ebola, then I believe the risk would be worth it. However, a child is not contagious without a fever and without bodily fluids. In a school setting, you should never touch the bodily fluids of a child. The practically zero chance of this child spreading Ebola is not worth the educational, social, and emotional well being of the child.

Again, if there was a realistic chance of this child being infected that would be one thing, but that is not the case. To say that there would be no consequences or that the consequences don't matter, really doesn't really describe the situation.

I agree 100%.

And also -- being held back a grade is no big deal? Yeah -- it only affects the timing of the rest of your life.

Being held back a grade because you need it, academically, is one thing. Being held back a grade due to groundless paranoia is a whole other matter and really not fair. These people should just educate themselves instead of punishing a 3rd grader.

As a homeschooler it is awfully easy to be cavalier about what happens to kids in schools, isn't it? Being held back a grade is a really big deal.

KimPossible's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 hours ago
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3475

"Rivergallery" wrote:

I do understand missing school.. I do think if the TEACHERS worked with the girl... I even had teachers come to my home.. That it really wouldn't be a big issue.

Sounds great...where's the budget for it. Depending on the school district she is in, this is likely to not even be a possibility.

So say she misses learning long division because the teachers can't catch her up.... say she gets held back a grade.... is it really that big of an issue in the long run?

Considering how much of a risk there is (pretty much none) I'd say yes, thats a big deal. It would be an acceptable deal if she actually posed any sort of true risk.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

If there was a real danger of a child having Ebola, then I believe the risk would be worth it. However, a child is not contagious without a fever and without bodily fluids. In a school setting, you should never touch the bodily fluids of a child. The practically zero chance of this child spreading Ebola is not worth the educational, social, and emotional well being of the child.

Again, if there was a realistic chance of this child being infected that would be one thing, but that is not the case. To say that there would be no consequences or that the consequences don't matter, really doesn't really describe the situation.

You are assuming there was no mutation which many scientists are concerned about.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

"KimPossible" wrote:

Sounds great...where's the budget for it. Depending on the school district she is in, this is likely to not even be a possibility.

Considering how much of a risk there is (pretty much none) I'd say yes, thats a big deal. It would be an acceptable deal if she actually posed any sort of true risk.

It is in the budget to serve every child..... not sure why it would cost any more. And if the school choses this route ( keeping her out of the building they are responsible).. There is online public school.. we have skype she could even be plugged into the school day from her own home... There are a plethora of options besides being in the building. If we are talking pure academics.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

I agree 100%.

And also -- being held back a grade is no big deal? Yeah -- it only affects the timing of the rest of your life.

Being held back a grade because you need it, academically, is one thing. Being held back a grade due to groundless paranoia is a whole other matter and really not fair. These people should just educate themselves instead of punishing a 3rd grader.

As a homeschooler it is awfully easy to be cavalier about what happens to kids in schools, isn't it? Being held back a grade is a really big deal.

#1 Ad hominum attacks play no bearing in debates.

I have more than my fair share of knowledge regarding missing public school.. Not sure why you brought up my school choices for my children it does not garner support for your pov.. instead it ostracizes people... and is rude.

KimPossible's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 hours ago
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3475

"Rivergallery" wrote:

You are assuming there was no mutation which many scientists are concerned about.

No they aren't. This is false. They have to admit that it could happen, but do you know that no non-airborne virus has ever mutated and become airborne? Don't srpead false information. No real scientist is actually worried about this.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301
KimPossible's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 hours ago
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3475

"Rivergallery" wrote:

It is in the budget to serve every child..... not sure why it would cost any more.

To send teachers to this girls home? What teachers? Who are they not teaching while they are at this girls home? Or is this someone else they are going to hire? You can't just say "oh its in the budget" Money is finite.

And if the school choses this route ( keeping her out of the building they are responsible).. There is online public school.. we have skype she could even be plugged into the school day from her own home... There are a plethora of options besides being in the building. If we are talking pure academics.

No offense RG, but I think Laurie does have a legitimate point here and she is not just 'attacking' you. You seem to be somewhat out of touch with the public school world. Just because you've seen someone do an online public schooling doesn't mean its available for anyone and everyone, and certainly not on such short notice. Plus...is the district actually doing any of this or trying to? Or are they going to wait and see how far behind she is after she has missed 3 weeks of school?

Irresponsible really.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

There is concern..
It is being looked at and discussed and researched -
Fact or Fiction?: The Ebola Virus Will Go Airborne - Scientific American
Is Ebola Airborne? | Veterans Today
Is Ebola Airborne? Aerial Transmission Of The Virus Cannot Be

In addition... even scientists that hold to the fluid only say - it is rare but possible that if someone sneezed on you and you rubbed your eyes it MAY infect you...

OK.. now move this to children... do you think you can keep their hands away from their face? depending on their age it is worse and worse. No wonder it is spreading so fast in Africa!

KimPossible's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 hours ago
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3475

"Rivergallery" wrote:

There is concern..
It is being looked at and discussed and researched -
Fact or Fiction?: The Ebola Virus Will Go Airborne - Scientific American
Is Ebola Airborne? | Veterans Today
Is Ebola Airborne? Aerial Transmission Of The Virus Cannot Be

from the very first article you posted

"But interviews with several infectious diseases experts reveal that whereas such a mutation—or more likely series of mutations—might physically be possible, it’s highly unlikely. In fact, there’s almost no historical precedent for any virus to change its basic mode of transmission so radically. "

To say there is a possibility is a lot different than saying there is a possibility you have to worry about. I will stand my ground on this, no real scientist is actually worried about this.

In addition... even scientists that hold to the fluid only say - it is rare but possible that if someone sneezed on you and you rubbed your eyes it MAY infect you...

OK.. now move this to children... do you think you can keep their hands away from their face? depending on their age it is worse and worse. No wonder it is spreading so fast in Africa!

You need something to spread first. She is symptomless and never even went to a country that has any current cases of ebola.

Time to stop the hysteria

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

"KimPossible" wrote:

To send teachers to this girls home? What teachers? Who are they not teaching while they are at this girls home? Or is this someone else they are going to hire? You can't just say "oh its in the budget" Money is finite.

No offense RG, but I think Laurie does have a legitimate point here and she is not just 'attacking' you. You seem to be somewhat out of touch with the public school world. Just because you've seen someone do an online public schooling doesn't mean its available for anyone and everyone, and certainly not on such short notice. Plus...is the district actually doing any of this or trying to? Or are they going to wait and see how far behind she is after she has missed 3 weeks of school?

Irresponsible really.

#1 - my teachers came after school. There are also tutors available in many cases.
#2 - IT was an attack as she brought personal life into debate.. that is a ad hominum attack.. and has nothing to do with the debate.

I attended public school.. I missed many days.. (I brought that into the debate). Want a couple more personal proofs? My grandmother was a teacher, my mother also and a tutor, I worked in the public school, and was a teacher at a preschool. Need more? I have great friends using online public school.. In our state we have two online public school options. There are also the non-public school options which I didn't bring up.. but that would feasibly keep her up educationally. Another one? MY best friends son just missed 3 weeks of school due to an emergency medical issue.. He is loving to return and his education is FINE... why? #1 beginning of the year like I mentioned #2 his parent and teacher have great communication and work was sent home to keep him on track.

As far as the stigma... My BF son had mono which is also contagious... which could be severely made fun of.. it is a "Kissing disease" and he is 8!..

Get over yourselves and the attacks.. I know what I am talking about.. debate facts not the person... Not sure why Missy allows this but maybe it will take a note to her AGAIN.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

"KimPossible" wrote:

from the very first article you posted

"But interviews with several infectious diseases experts reveal that whereas such a mutation—or more likely series of mutations—might physically be possible, it’s highly unlikely. In fact, there’s almost no historical precedent for any virus to change its basic mode of transmission so radically. "

To say there is a possibility is a lot different than saying there is a possibility you have to worry about. I will stand my ground on this, no real scientist is actually worried about this.

You need something to spread first. She is symptomless and never even went to a country that has any current cases of ebola.

Time to stop the hysteria

Since AUGUST..... that is not very long ago.

KimPossible's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 hours ago
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3475

"Rivergallery" wrote:

#1 - my teachers came after school. There are also tutors available in many cases.

In this country it is totally inaccurate to assume that because you had this when you were a child in your district that it would be obviously available where this girl is.

#2 - IT was an attack as she brought personal life into debate.. that is a ad hominum attack.. and has nothing to do with the debate.

Sure it does, the fact that you have less exposure to the public school system as it is today is an explanation as to why you think some things should be so easily accessable that are not. Now if she brought up something completely unrelated to the discussion...then i'd agree with you, but this is a valid point.

I attended public school.. I missed many days.. (I brought that into the debate). Want a couple more personal proofs? My grandmother was a teacher, my mother also and a tutor, I worked in the public school, and was a teacher at a preschool. Need more? I have great friends using online public school.. In our state we have two online public school options. There are also the non-public school options which I didn't bring up.. but that would feasibly keep her up educationally. Another one? MY best friends son just missed 3 weeks of school due to an emergency medical issue.. He is loving to return and his education is FINE... why? #1 beginning of the year like I mentioned #2 his parent and teacher have great communication and work was sent home to keep him on track.

Then why with all this supposed knowledge would you think that these experiences are transferrable to every school district. If you know so much about our school system, you must realize that distrct A != district B....

it all depends on states, funding, budgets, socio economic status of the town, and school policies. I can tell you that the experiences you have provided do NOT mean that those resources or experiences are available to every student in this country. Not even close.

Get over yourselves and the attacks.. I know what I am talking about.. debate facts not the person... Not sure why Missy allows this but maybe it will take a note to her AGAIN.

I don't care if you homeschool or not really...you are simply incorrect to assume all the things you are assuming.

KimPossible's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 hours ago
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3475

"Rivergallery" wrote:

Since AUGUST..... that is not very long ago.

And this scientifically means....what?

This post screams of panic and hysteria.

KimPossible's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 hours ago
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3475

Also, as a homsechooler, i would think you would be the first to acknowledge that every student is different. So I'm not sure what your friends 8 year old son has to do with this. And thats not an attack, i think thats one of the great things about homeschooling.

Plus its one thing to miss school because you actually have a medical condition....as oppose to missing school because irrational parents are freaking out about a disease you don't actually have.

Maybe they should just keep their kids home instead.

ETA: Yep, actually i think that is what should have happened. The district should have put out a very clear and scientifically factual letter explaining why this child is safe to attend school and given any parent who is still freaked out about it the option to keep their kid home for 21 days...let them be the ones who suffer the consequences...especially if those consequences are 'no big deal'.

GloriaInTX's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 2 days ago
Joined: 07/29/08
Posts: 4230

In this case I think this child should be allowed to go to school. Especially since the whole country she visited has had no cases for more than 21 days, so there is no more chance of her being infected than any other child at the school.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

"KimPossible" wrote:

In this country it is totally inaccurate to assume that because you had this when you were a child in your district that it would be obviously available where this girl is.

Sure it does, the fact that you have less exposure to the public school system as it is today is an explanation as to why you think some things should be so easily accessable that are not. Now if she brought up something completely unrelated to the discussion...then i'd agree with you, but this is a valid point.

Then why with all this supposed knowledge would you think that these experiences are transferrable to every school district. If you know so much about our school system, you must realize that distrct A != district B....

it all depends on states, funding, budgets, socio economic status of the town, and school policies. I can tell you that the experiences you have provided do NOT mean that those resources or experiences are available to every student in this country. Not even close.

I don't care if you homeschool or not really...you are simply incorrect to assume all the things you are assuming.

If you go back.. I said they SHOULD be available.. especially in a school where they kept a child out.. There should be options and are. Not sure why you are all banking on there not being help available.

Secondly.. this family has $$ they just went to Africa for goodness sake.. a private tutor for a few weeks is not going to break the bank.

KimPossible's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 hours ago
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3475

"Rivergallery" wrote:

If you go back.. I said they SHOULD be available.. especially in a school where they kept a child out.. There should be options and are. Not sure why you are all banking on there not being help available.

Well its great to talk about the way things should be, but how can the way things should be be used in an argument about why its okay that this girl misses so much school. You would need to actually know that all of this would be available to her in order to use that as an argument about why this is perfectly fine to do. And I don't think it holds any merit without that knowledge since districts do vary so wildly making it hard to propose that its more likely available to her than not.

Secondly.. this family has $$ they just went to Africa for goodness sake.. a private tutor for a few weeks is not going to break the bank.

How about all the parents who are irrationally afraid shell out the money for private tutors. This child is no risk, her parents shouldn't have to pay for anything, she is a victim of Fearbola.

GloriaInTX's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 weeks 2 days ago
Joined: 07/29/08
Posts: 4230

I don't agree that she should have to stay at home, but I think the school is responsible for providing a tutor for her if she stays home. When my son had cancer and wasn't able to attend school the school provided a tutor to come to our house to help him keep up with his school work.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

How fun, I was gone for the morning and came back to many missed pages. I confess to only skimming.

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

As a homeschooler it is awfully easy to be cavalier about what happens to kids in schools, isn't it? Being held back a grade is a really big deal.

About the homeschooling issue, I did want to say that you can not lump everyone into one group. I would say many (if not most) homeschoolers would not have the same opinion on this subject.

"Rivergallery" wrote:

You are assuming there was no mutation which many scientists are concerned about.

There is not any evidence at this point in time to warrant doing this to a child that was not directly exposed to Ebola.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

"GloriaInTX" wrote:

I don't agree that she should have to stay at home, but I think the school is responsible for providing a tutor for her if she stays home. When my son had cancer and wasn't able to attend school the school provided a tutor to come to our house to help him keep up with his school work.

The schools here provide tutors in home for a variety of reasons. The teachers get paid extra by the hour and I know many of them enjoy the extra pay to supplement their income. Any time a child is out for an extended period of time due to illness, a tutor comes to the home. If the disease really was "airborne" though, the tutor would just bring it back to school with them the next day.

mom3girls's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 3 months ago
Joined: 01/09/07
Posts: 1537

We had an issue at a local school last week where a family was returning from Sengal and some parents were demanding that the children stay home. The school put out a press release stating the scientific evidence that there were no current cases of Ebola in that country that that the kids would be welcomed back at school. It also suggested that if parents were concerned they they could keep their children home for however long they felt necessary.
That shut parents down pretty quick.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

"mom3girls" wrote:

We had an issue at a local school last week where a family was returning from Sengal and some parents were demanding that the children stay home. The school put out a press release stating the scientific evidence that there were no current cases of Ebola in that country that that the kids would be welcomed back at school. It also suggested that if parents were concerned they they could keep their children home for however long they felt necessary.
That shut parents down pretty quick.

I think cases like that are happening all over the country. Some where the school is keeping the kids home and some where the school is welcoming them back.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 8 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301
KimPossible's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 hours ago
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3475

"Rivergallery" wrote:

All Participating Schools in Connecticut | K12

Great so all the kids with irrationally afraid parents can arrange to school their kids online then. Still should not be the problem of a child the medical community doesn't even deem a risk.

Offline
Last seen: 1 year 6 months ago
Joined: 05/13/02
Posts: 414

This is all starting to remind me of the boy who became infected with HIV/AIDS in the 80's from a blood transfer, and was forced to moved because of the hysteria and horrible treatment his family received.

I think it is ridiculous this child was forced to stay home for 20 days. Way for the school district to feed in to the mass hysteria instead of using facts to calm fears.