Deaf 3 year old asked to change his name? - Page 2
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Thread: Deaf 3 year old asked to change his name?

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    Definitely going too far.

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    Mega Poster mom3girls's Avatar
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    Makes you wonder what kind of adult was thinking this? Are they not using common sense at all?
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    Posting Addict smsturner's Avatar
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    This is nuts. It's his name. It's even registered with the sign language assoc. Smells of an equal rights case to me if they don't drop it fast...
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    In Deaf culture, that is the same thing. A Deaf child is given a sign name that is much thought over. They are given that sign name, and have that same sign name for the rest of their life unless they change it when they get married or other major life changing event.
    Quote Originally Posted by smsturner View Post
    This is nuts. It's his name. It's even registered with the sign language assoc. Smells of an equal rights case to me if they don't drop it fast...
    Can I ask you two a question that is slightly OT? Did you notice they use SEE instead of ASL? Is this common where you are? I remember people having some really strong opinions on it back when I was in college.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ethanwinfield View Post
    Can I ask you two a question that is slightly OT? Did you notice they use SEE instead of ASL? Is this common where you are? I remember people having some really strong opinions on it back when I was in college.
    I can unequivocally tell you that it is not common and judging by your post it seems you are of that view? Correct me if I'm wrong though! The use of SEE is more common among hearing parents with a deaf child because you sign exactly how you speak. Deaf people do not 'speak' the way hearing people do.

    My mother is an only hearing child of deaf parents and is a certified sign language interpreter in ASL (and she also is fluent in SEE and BSL) and she says that the deaf community really views SEE as a cop out by hearing parents who they view as not motivated enough to learn what will and should be the language spoken in their child's community. My mom sees it from time to time. She intervened for a deaf girl in a mainstreamed classroom who used SEE. She was terribly segregated from the deaf community, but my mother said she though the girl's parents wanted it that way - to keep her in a hearing world and minimize her 'deafness', so to speak.

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    Posting Addict smsturner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ethanwinfield View Post
    Can I ask you two a question that is slightly OT? Did you notice they use SEE instead of ASL? Is this common where you are? I remember people having some really strong opinions on it back when I was in college.
    I'm sorry...I'm not understanding, why should it matter which one they use for his name? If it's his name, it's his name. It's like saying his name is on the state birth certificate but not the federal. It's still his registered name.
    Or are you just curious of my views on the language itself? I know a little ASL, and no SEE, and honestly will admit to being too ignorant of the whole argument to make a judgement. But I will be reading this with interest to see more about them

    Clairesmommy, i forget your name, i'm sorry. It's very interesting to hear about it. What a sad story for that girl. Her social needs can't have been being met. It's great your mother was able to help.
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    Quote Originally Posted by smsturner View Post
    I'm sorry...I'm not understanding, why should it matter which one they use for his name? If it's his name, it's his name. It's like saying his name is on the state birth certificate but not the federal. It's still his registered name.
    Or are you just curious of my views on the language itself? I know a little ASL, and no SEE, and honestly will admit to being too ignorant of the whole argument to make a judgement. But I will be reading this with interest to see more about them

    Clairesmommy, i forget your name, i'm sorry. It's very interesting to hear about it. What a sad story for that girl. Her social needs can't have been being met. It's great your mother was able to help.
    It's Lisa, btw! She wasn't able to help. She was paid to interpret what the teacher said and that's about it. Yes, she helped her with telling time, helping her get on the right bus, teaching her how to pay for things in a store, etc. but my mother would've been kicked to the curb if she went against the girl's parents' wishes and tried to introduce her to the deaf community.

    I can't speak for ethanwinfield, but it's plausible that being such an enormous difference between SEE and ASL, that the school's view is that there wouldn't or shouldn't be such a strong emphasis in having a deaf 'name' or name symbol per se, and that he could've easily just finger spelled his name. Now, I absolutely do not agree with that (if that's what the school was thinking). I'm just playing devil's advocate a bit and trying to think of why the school thought it would just be so simple to say/sign his name in another way. Hearing people or people who've had no exposure to deaf culture sometimes have a hard time accepting deafness as a culture and not a disability. While I definitely see it as a culture, I do still believe deafness is a disability, in the strictess sense. A person is not able to hear - disabled. That's basically where it stops for me though. My grandfather was the smartest, wisest, most hilarious person I ever met. I'm sad I never got to have a real conversation with him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smsturner View Post
    I'm sorry...I'm not understanding, why should it matter which one they use for his name? If it's his name, it's his name. It's like saying his name is on the state birth certificate but not the federal. It's still his registered name.
    Or are you just curious of my views on the language itself? I know a little ASL, and no SEE, and honestly will admit to being too ignorant of the whole argument to make a judgement. But I will be reading this with interest to see more about them

    Clairesmommy, i forget your name, i'm sorry. It's very interesting to hear about it. What a sad story for that girl. Her social needs can't have been being met. It's great your mother was able to help.
    ASL is a recognized language. SEE is signed exact English - not a recognized language - and like Claire'sMommy said, it is less for the deaf child and more the hearing parents.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mom3girls View Post
    Makes you wonder what kind of adult was thinking this? Are they not using common sense at all?
    I know right?? I guess I can see one person coming up with a stupid idea, but where did they find enough people to go forward with this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ethanwinfield View Post
    ASL is a recognized language. SEE is signed exact English - not a recognized language - and like Claire'sMommy said, it is less for the deaf child and more the hearing parents.
    This is really interesting to me. I knew there are different types of sign language, but didn't know the difference between them.

    So, when I sign the alphabet, I'm doing SEE, but if I sign "more" or "please" with my kids, its ASL?

    I can certainly see where the debate between use of the two would come from. Interesting.

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