Dr. Appt. - how long is too long to wait? - Page 2
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Thread: Dr. Appt. - how long is too long to wait?

  1. #11
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    I once took my daughter to a doctor (who has since lost his licence) who routinely made me wait between 6-8 hours to be seen. I was on TN care at the time and was not allowed to change doctors for 6 months. It was awful. I ended up not taking her to the doctor unless it was an emergency and then changed as soon as I could.

    I have been to various specialist appointments that have taken several hours. Ideally would like for them to be 15-30 minutes, I have had that happen, but I would say is not the norm in this area.

    ~Bonita~

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    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
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    I don't think I would have waited that long. I can't even imagine. If you'd been that late she wouldn't see you, so why should you wait for her? I'd at least demand a discount, your time is money just as hers is! And being delayed that long might actually cost you money (babysitter, parking garage, time off work) that you could have avoided if her office would have let you know she was running that late. That's just greedy and unprofessional, and I would tell her to her face. Also give her a bad rating on Yelp! I have never waited that long anywhere except the ER, and I probably haven't even waited that long at an ER more than once. But again, that's one thing I love about Kaiser. They schedule enough time for every appointment, and they don't overbook the doctors. There's no need to, it just ticks off the patients/clients, and they make enough money on us already. If it's urgent and my doctor is full, I can see someone else but I won't have to wait that long.
    David Letterman is retiring. Such great memories of watching him over the past thirty-two years!

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    OT - What is Kaiser? I saw that recently on another forum. I tried Googling it, but it did not give a clear answer.

    ~Bonita~

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    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
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    Depends on the place. I think the latest I waited for a scheduled GP appt was an hour and a half. I've never ever waited long for specialists, especially for the kids. Urgent care varies from just a minute or two to 5 hours. Yeah, the minute wait is for really sick people, the 5 hour wait is for like minor breaks and mild illness. Yay for triage. If I went to the ER with a broken wrist, for example, I'd probably wait at least 8 hours.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClairesMommy View Post
    Depends on the place. I think the latest I waited for a scheduled GP appt was an hour and a half. I've never ever waited long for specialists, especially for the kids. Urgent care varies from just a minute or two to 5 hours. Yeah, the minute wait is for really sick people, the 5 hour wait is for like minor breaks and mild illness. Yay for triage. If I went to the ER with a broken wrist, for example, I'd probably wait at least 8 hours.
    3 week ago, Express Care was confident I had appendicitis and wanted me to go back to the ER so they could rule it out with a CT scan. I showed them the paperwork expressing that, and I was still labeled as "abdominal pain." I was at the ER at 7pm and didn't even get called back to an exam room until around 12:45am. Had the CT scan at around 2 or 3 am. It was finally confirmed that I had appendicitis but I was never expedited and I'm guessing because my appendix never burst (thankfully). I finally had the surgery at 9:20am the next day. So that's what... 14 hours? Lol, pretty pathetic huh.

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    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
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    It's full name is Kaiser Permanente and it's a "captive model" HMO which mean that, with few exceptions, members can get medical care only from plan doctors & hospitals and plan hospitals & doctors only serve members. All of the doctors & other staff are employees of the Permanente Medical Group; they are salaried and work a set schedule. All patients are members of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan which is a non-profit. All Kaiser Foundation Hospitals are run as non-profit entities. It's an integrated model of health care which means that all providers have the same access to the same information, and all providers can refer you to any other provider, so if your OB notices a lump in your breast, she sends you directly to mammography instead of you having to go back to your PCP for a referral. Or if you're in the ER for something & can't remember what medicine you take, the ER doctor can look it up quickly & easily, avoiding complications. They are very big on preventive medicine so they fund things like weight loss classes for overweight people, stress management for people with high BP, and regular liver panel blood tests for people with hepatitis B which can cause a form of liver cancer that is close to 100% treatable with surgery when it's discovered quickly. And all related services are available in the same building, so you can take your kid to the ped, get a shot, have blood drawn, and pick up a prescription all in one trip. I love Kaiser!

    Why Become a Member | Kaiser Permanente ? Thrive
    David Letterman is retiring. Such great memories of watching him over the past thirty-two years!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    It's full name is Kaiser Permanente and it's a "captive model" HMO which mean that, with few exceptions, members can get medical care only from plan doctors & hospitals and plan hospitals & doctors only serve members. All of the doctors & other staff are employees of the Permanente Medical Group; they are salaried and work a set schedule. All patients are members of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan which is a non-profit. All Kaiser Foundation Hospitals are run as non-profit entities. It's an integrated model of health care which means that all providers have the same access to the same information, and all providers can refer you to any other provider, so if your OB notices a lump in your breast, she sends you directly to mammography instead of you having to go back to your PCP for a referral. Or if you're in the ER for something & can't remember what medicine you take, the ER doctor can look it up quickly & easily, avoiding complications. They are very big on preventive medicine so they fund things like weight loss classes for overweight people, stress management for people with high BP, and regular liver panel blood tests for people with hepatitis B which can cause a form of liver cancer that is close to 100% treatable with surgery when it's discovered quickly. And all related services are available in the same building, so you can take your kid to the ped, get a shot, have blood drawn, and pick up a prescription all in one trip. I love Kaiser!

    Why Become a Member | Kaiser Permanente ? Thrive
    This is interesting to me. The other group where I first heard about it were all very negative about it and saying how horrible it is. Nice to get more than one side. Is it only in California?

    ~Bonita~

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    Wikipedia says they are in nine states and the District of Columbia. A lot of people don't like not being able to choose a specialist, but I've never had an issue with it. And a lot of people don't realize that, even though you're assigned a PCP when you join, you can switch to anyone who has availability on their schedule.

    One thing I don't like about Kaiser is the way they "do" birth. You don't get "your" OB, you get whomever is at the hospital at that day & time, and that person might leave at 8pm and you find yourself meeting someone new while you're in transition. That's why I chose homebirth with a midwife, even though I had to pay out-of-pocket for it, and why I tell anyone giving birth at Kaiser to bring a doula.
    David Letterman is retiring. Such great memories of watching him over the past thirty-two years!

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    I think the birth thing is common everywhere at least here. It was a huge reason I opted for midwives. If you are at the hospital yougo get doc there. Might not even be from the office you go to but the mid wives are all from the office so you know who it is that is delivering you because you've met her before.

    My company has something similar and it's a huge thing insurance/health care payment model wise. It's called the AQC contract and if you google it there are lots of articles out on it. Basically, we pay a circle X amount of dollars to treat with rewards for awesome outcomes. They refer to specialists in their circle unless that specialist doesn't exist and all care is easily accessed with internal records. There are many circles though which is different from the Kaiser model.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mommytoMR.FACE View Post
    3 week ago, Express Care was confident I had appendicitis and wanted me to go back to the ER so they could rule it out with a CT scan. I showed them the paperwork expressing that, and I was still labeled as "abdominal pain." I was at the ER at 7pm and didn't even get called back to an exam room until around 12:45am. Had the CT scan at around 2 or 3 am. It was finally confirmed that I had appendicitis but I was never expedited and I'm guessing because my appendix never burst (thankfully). I finally had the surgery at 9:20am the next day. So that's what... 14 hours? Lol, pretty pathetic huh.
    You are very lucky, Deniz! Same thing happened to my brother a few months ago. Went to the U2 concert, came home and wasn't feeling great, went to the hospital where he waited for hours and hours. He had to have a open surgery because his appendix was leaking pus into his abdomen and he was on meds for 3 weeks to kill the infection in his gut. Lucky guy. We've had cases of otherwise healthy teens and young adults sitting in emerg and dying in the waiting room from a ruptured appendix, or being sent home for nothing more than 'abdominal pain' only to have it rupture at home and then die in the ambulance on the way back to the hospital. That's scary. For something so incredibly serious and potentially life-threatening I just don't get why it's dismissed and misdiagnosed so often.

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