Emailing in sick
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Thread: Emailing in sick

  1. #1
    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
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    Default Emailing in sick

    This is going around my work today. Email is the standard method here to report in sick because there's not just a written record there's also a timestamp of when the absence was reported. The official policy says only that the "supervisor and timekeeper must be notified of your absence prior to the absence occuring."

    A co-worker (I'll call him Joe) is being disciplined for not directly emailing his supervisor (I'll call him Ted) to report in sick. Joe was emailing his timekeeper & cc'ing Ted, which honestly is what most of us do since the timekeeper is the one, well, keeping track of our time. Ted wrote up Joe as being "disrespectful" and demanded that future absences be reported directly to him. Recently Joe wrote an email, very late on a Sunday night, to some co-workers with whom he had a meeting scheduled on Monday morning, to let them know that he was sick & wouldn't make the meeting. He then forwarded that email to both his timekeeper & Ted, rather than write a second email, and he was written up for that as being "disrespectful," as well. Now the scuttlebutt around the office is that Ted is trying to get Joe fired for "willful disobedience."

    Do you think it's disrespectful to not address your supervisor directly when reporting an absence, especially if there isn't a policy stating that is to be done? Do you think Ted was justified in making that demand? Do you think forwarding an email instead of writing out a new original is willful disobedience?
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    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    I really wouldn't think that this should be a big deal and to me it sounds like the supervisor is being a douche. Maybe he has some other beef with this employee so this is just something else he wants to nitpick about. This would never be a problem in my office. We don't have a timekeeper, so I only report to my supervisor...however I'm 100% positive my supervisor definitely would not mind if he found out about my absence via a CC.

    But on the flip side, if this employee knows his supervisor is going to pitch a fit about it, why does he keep doing it? Just doesn't seem like a hill worth dying on to me.
    blather and Danifo like this.

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    I'm with Kim 100% on both counts. It's stupid and annoying but if it's an issue for the supervisor then he should just suck it up. I don't think it's disrespectful at all, though.

    My boss at my last job would have been fine with getting the information however it came in, even if it was someone else on my team walking in and telling him.
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  4. #4
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    I agree with Kim. I think the supervisor is being a turd and having a power trip but I would just email him first if that is an issue.

    My job requires a call in so I haven't experienced this at my current job.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    This is going around my work today. Email is the standard method here to report in sick because there's not just a written record there's also a timestamp of when the absence was reported. The official policy says only that the "supervisor and timekeeper must be notified of your absence prior to the absence occuring."

    A co-worker (I'll call him Joe) is being disciplined for not directly emailing his supervisor (I'll call him Ted) to report in sick. Joe was emailing his timekeeper & cc'ing Ted, which honestly is what most of us do since the timekeeper is the one, well, keeping track of our time. Ted wrote up Joe as being "disrespectful" and demanded that future absences be reported directly to him. Recently Joe wrote an email, very late on a Sunday night, to some co-workers with whom he had a meeting scheduled on Monday morning, to let them know that he was sick & wouldn't make the meeting. He then forwarded that email to both his timekeeper & Ted, rather than write a second email, and he was written up for that as being "disrespectful," as well. Now the scuttlebutt around the office is that Ted is trying to get Joe fired for "willful disobedience."

    Do you think it's disrespectful to not address your supervisor directly when reporting an absence, especially if there isn't a policy stating that is to be done? Do you think Ted was justified in making that demand? Do you think forwarding an email instead of writing out a new original is willful disobedience?

    I think this is making a giant issue out of nothing. But if somehow it's such a big deal, then why not email Ted everytime directly and cc all others? Seems simple to me.
    Aisha

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    Mega Poster mom3girls's Avatar
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    I think you have to know your boss. My boss wouldnt care at all, but if she did I would make sure I did things the way she requested. Seems pretty simple to me
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