Evolution - Spin Off from the School Vouchers Thread
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Thread: Evolution - Spin Off from the School Vouchers Thread

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    Community Host Alissa_Sal's Avatar
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    Default Evolution - Spin Off from the School Vouchers Thread

    Sounds like some of you are spoilin' for an evolution debate. So....I may kick myself for this later but.....

    Evolution: Science fact or science fiction? Also, is there scientific evidence for ID? What do you believe, and why?
    -Alissa, mom to Tristan (5) and Reid (the baby!)

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    It is a theory, and should be taught as such. ID is also a theory, and should be taught as such. It does little good to hide information. Just like I would never teach my girls that everyone believes just as we do, the public schools should not teach that evolution is the only possible explanation.
    Princess&ThePea likes this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    It is a theory, and should be taught as such. ID is also a theory, and should be taught as such. It does little good to hide information. Just like I would never teach my girls that everyone believes just as we do, the public schools should not teach that evolution is the only possible explanation.
    Evolution is a theory, that's true. The difference is the meaning of the word "Theory" when we are talking about science.

    Science, Evolution, and Creationism

    Is Evolution a Theory or a Fact?



    It is both. But that answer requires looking more deeply at the meanings of the words “theory” and “fact.”


    In everyday usage, “theory” often refers to a hunch or a speculation. When people say, “I have a theory about why that happened,” they are often drawing a conclusion based on fragmentary or inconclusive evidence.


    The formal scientific definition of theory is quite different from the everyday meaning of the word. It refers to a comprehensive explanation of some aspect of nature that is supported by a vast body of evidence.


    Many scientific theories are so well established that no new evidence is likely to alter them substantially. For example, no new evidence will demonstrate that the Earth does not orbit around the Sun (heliocentric theory), or that living things are not made of cells (cell theory), that matter is not composed of atoms, or that the surface of the Earth is not divided into solid plates that have moved over geological timescales (the theory of plate tectonics). Like these other foundational scientific theories, the theory of evolution is supported by so many observations and confirming experiments that scientists are confident that the basic components of the theory will not be overturned by new evidence. However, like all scientific theories, the theory of evolution is subject to continuing refinement as new areas of science emerge or as new technologies enable observations and experiments that were not possible previously.


    One of the most useful properties of scientific theories is that they can be used to make predictions about natural events or phenomena that have not yet been observed. For example, the theory of gravitation predicted the behavior of objects on the Moon and other planets long before the activities of spacecraft and astronauts confirmed them. The evolutionary biologists who discovered Tiktaalik (see page 2) predicted that they would find fossils intermediate between fish and limbed terrestrial animals in sediments that were about 375 million years old. Their discovery confirmed the prediction made on the basis of evolutionary theory. In turn, confirmation of a prediction increases confidence in that theory.


    In science, a “fact” typically refers to an observation, measurement, or other form of evidence that can be expected to occur the same way under similar circumstances. However, scientists also use the term “fact” to refer to a scientific explanation that has been tested and confirmed so many times that there is no longer a compelling reason to keep testing it or looking for additional examples. In that respect, the past and continuing occurrence of evolution is a scientific fact. Because the evidence supporting it is so strong, scientists no longer question whether biological evolution has occurred and is continuing to occur. Instead, they investigate the mechanisms of evolution, how rapidly evolution can take place, and related questions.
    I'm pretty sure ID doesn't even qualify as a theory, scientifically speaking, as there must be loads of observable data supporting it to be a theory in science.
    -Alissa, mom to Tristan (5) and Reid (the baby!)

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    I can except Micro-evolution as a theory and even fact. We can see that over time subtle differences do change in different species. Macro-evolution, however takes just as much faith to believe as Creationism. It is just not possible that all of this great world puffed into being. I have said before it would be like taking a beautiful Thomas Kinkade painting and saying that someone splashed some paint on a canvas and that is how it turned out. Just not possible. Not only that, that the paint magically appeared and splashed itself on the canvas. You can not teach that as fact because A. No one was there to see it happen, and B. You can't recreate it.

    ~Bonita~

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    I think it's a misunderstanding to think that evolution is random. True, mutations are random, but whether a mutation makes the animal more likely to survive depends on the environment that the animal lives in. We are shaped by our environments, that is not at all random. For example, if giraffes didn't live in areas where the leaves they eat are up high, they most likely wouldn't have evolved long necks randomly. Sure, some of them would have randomly gotten the long neck mutation, but it wouldn't have been beneficial, and those animals wouldn't have survived longer to reproduce more and pass on their genes more often, so it probably wouldn't have "taken" especially since I imagine those long necks are costly (takes more resources to "fuel", limits where they can live, et cetera.) So it's not random, like splashing paint on canvas, that giraffes evolved to have long necks. The only random part is the mutation itself.
    -Alissa, mom to Tristan (5) and Reid (the baby!)

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    But what are you saying the giraffe evolved from? It had to come from somewhere. In micro-evolution, you account for differences in different species, but not an ape turning into a man or a single cell turning into a dinosaur.

    ~Bonita~

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    Based on what you presented I would call it a fact however when I was in school that nothing in science is fact and is always a theory lol so it's hard for me to say fact but yes based on the definitions given it is fact. It has been proven time and time again and we have evidence to support it.

    However, since I believe in God I don't believe evolution to exist without "Him". I think it's all part of our plan here on Earth and that there is a higher purpose for it but I don't think it doesn't exist. That's just silly.

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    Sorry, double post.
    Last edited by Alissa_Sal; 08-13-2012 at 11:06 PM.
    -Alissa, mom to Tristan (5) and Reid (the baby!)

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    Apologize for the Wiki, too tired to research more extensively tonight.

    Giraffe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The giraffe is one of only two living species of the family Giraffidae, the other being the okapi. The family was once much more extensive, with over 10 fossil genera described. Giraffids first arose 8 million years ago (mya) in south-central Europe during the Miocene epoch. The superfamily Giraffoidea, together with the family Antilocapridae (whose only extant species is the pronghorn), evolved from the extinct family Palaeomerycidae.[9] The earliest known giraffid was the deer-like Climacoceras.

    While the progressive elongation of the neck and limbs can be found throughout the giraffid lineage, it became more pronounced in genera such as Giraffokeryx, Palaeotragus (possible ancestor of the okapi), Samotherium and Bohlinia.[9] Bohlinia entered China and northern India in response to climate change. From here, the genus Giraffa evolved and, around 7 mya, entered Africa. Further climate changes caused the extinction of the Asian giraffes, while the African ones survived and radiated into several new species. G. camelopardalis arose around 1 mya in eastern Africa during the Pleistocene.[9] Some biologists suggest that the modern giraffe descended from G. jumae;[10] others find G. gracilis a more likely candidate.[9] It is believed that the main driver for the evolution of the giraffes was the change from extensive forests to more open habitats, which began 8 mya.[9]

    The giraffe was one of the many species first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. He gave it the binomial name Cervus camelopardalis. Morten Thrane Br?nnich classified the genus Giraffa in 1772.[11] In the early 19th century, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck believed that the giraffe's long neck was an "acquired characteristic", developed as generations of ancestral giraffes strived to reach the leaves of tall trees.[12] This theory was eventually rejected, and scientists now believe that the giraffe's neck arose through Darwinian natural selection?that ancestral giraffes with long necks thereby had a competitive advantage that better enabled them to reproduce and pass on their genes.[12]
    -Alissa, mom to Tristan (5) and Reid (the baby!)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jessica80 View Post
    Based on what you presented I would call it a fact however when I was in school that nothing in science is fact and is always a theory lol so it's hard for me to say fact but yes based on the definitions given it is fact. It has been proven time and time again and we have evidence to support it.
    It is not fact. If it was proven, hundreds of thousands of people would not believe something very different. Where do you think that very first something came from that everything evolved from? The very first something had to come from somewhere or something. It has not, can can not be proven that everything evolved from nothing. Or that people evolved from apes or other animals. Therefore, it should not be taught that is and only this is the only possible explanation for how things came into being.

    ~Bonita~

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