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    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
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    Good grief. Can't use 'BMI', can't give a 'F' grade. How many more letters can we take out of the vocabulary of the school-aged?

    I see obesity as a much larger epidemic than anorexia. They don't want to use the BMI figure for fear of creating an eating disorder??? Well look around you - Schools are filled with kids with eating problems. Just their problem is eating too much and/or eating the wrong stuff, with zero exercise.
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    If I had to choose one word, I'd go with harmful over helpful. This is something I expect from my child's doctor, not her school. Her doctor knows her, knows her historic growth cycles, and can offer real information about her health and nutrition instead of just "here's your number."

    I'd rather see the money & energy being spent on BMI measurement go into an effort to get the kids to actually eat their more-nutritious school lunches rather than having kids go hungry all day & then pick up junk food after school. The grownups say, we need school lunches to be more nutritious, so the government is making it happen, and now the kids are throwing the fresh fruit & whole grain pasta into the trash. I saw this article the other day but couldn't post because DH was hogging the computer.

    Some School Districts Quit Healthier Lunch Program - ABC News
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    Wow! The comments are vicious!

    Call me when they start getting rid of the fat teachers that set such a bad example for the students.
    So Right! We got the letter in the mail too. Teachers should get weighed in too!
    When I was in school we got weighed twice a year and the weight was written on our report cards. AFAIK, this never created an eating disorder in my peers or me. They screened for several things that they still screen for - scoliosis, hearing, vision. They also test cognitive ability with standardized, GATE, and special ed. testing.

    I just can't see it as a bad thing. It's data. It's educating parents as to what is a healthy weight and what is not. Every time I take my kids to the doctor, he or she tells us "you are in the ___ percentile on height; the ___ percentile on weight." Just like not every parent can/will take their child to the eye doctor, they don't all get to the doctor unless there is a problem. I would not take offense to a letter suggesting I see a physician re: my child's height/weight/vision/hearing/spine.

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    I think it is more harmful than helpful. I agree with the lady on the video that says that someone that has an obese child, knows that their child is obese. Just telling a child that they are "bad" is not going to make them better. The only thing I can see this accomplishing is more bullying and more eating disorders.

    Stacy - The school that DH worked in last year had a program like that. They had all kinds of fresh fruits and veggies. Kids threw the food out in droves. They ended up setting up a table for the kids to put the unwanted food on for others to take.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ethanwinfield View Post
    I just can't see it as a bad thing. It's data. It's educating parents as to what is a healthy weight and what is not. Every time I take my kids to the doctor, he or she tells us "you are in the ___ percentile on height; the ___ percentile on weight." Just like not every parent can/will take their child to the eye doctor, they don't all get to the doctor unless there is a problem. I would not take offense to a letter suggesting I see a physician re: my child's height/weight/vision/hearing/spine.
    I do not think it is terrible to weigh a child and record the weight. Grading it "saying it is good or bad", is what I find objectionable. (Maybe I misunderstood, but I thought that is what was happening)

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    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    Stacy - The school that DH worked in last year had a program like that. They had all kinds of fresh fruits and veggies. Kids threw the food out in droves. They ended up setting up a table for the kids to put the unwanted food on for others to take.
    Our school has a "share table" and it's amazing. Some kids will put their entree on there & take two apples, someone else will put their apple & salad but take another entree. I love it, at least the kids are eating mostly good things and there's a lot less waste. And occasionally you'll see a kid go back & pick up their entree because they took a taste of someone else's and discovered it wasn't as bad as they thought!

    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    I do not think it is terrible to weigh a child and record the weight. Grading it "saying it is good or bad", is what I find objectionable. (Maybe I misunderstood, but I thought that is what was happening)
    Agreed, but they shouldn't just sent letters home to the fat kids because then it becomes, who got a letter, did you get a letter, I heard Susie got a letter, Billy needs a letter, and there's enough negative stuff going on between the kids already, they don't need fuel for the fire. It should be information that everyone gets, along with education about how to either stay as healthy as you are, or how get healthier -- promoting bike to school day, asking parents to chaperone walking schoolbuses, set up a running club at recess, etc. -- or it shouldn't be done at all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    Our school has a "share table" and it's amazing. Some kids will put their entree on there & take two apples, someone else will put their apple & salad but take another entree. I love it, at least the kids are eating mostly good things and there's a lot less waste. And occasionally you'll see a kid go back & pick up their entree because they took a taste of someone else's and discovered it wasn't as bad as they thought!


    Agreed, but they shouldn't just sent letters home to the fat kids because then it becomes, who got a letter, did you get a letter, I heard Susie got a letter, Billy needs a letter, and there's enough negative stuff going on between the kids already, they don't need fuel for the fire. It should be information that everyone gets, along with education about how to either stay as healthy as you are, or how get healthier -- promoting bike to school day, asking parents to chaperone walking schoolbuses, set up a running club at recess, etc. -- or it shouldn't be done at all.
    Wait, wouldn't the other kids already know who is fat or not? Getting a letter/not getting a letter won't change that.

    Why is weight still the elephant in the room? There is this social stigma that is really silly when you think about it. You're not a healthy weight but we can't point out that you're not at a healthy weight because kids who didn't used to know you are fat will now know.

    On a personal note, would your children's classmates care? Around here chunky seems to be the norm. But no one seems to notice or care.
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    Posting Addict mom2robbie's Avatar
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    Hmmm... I would not like to get a fat letter, actually I might like it since Robbie is so underweight...

    Robbie's school is an APPLE school, we have to sign a family commitment to healthy eating and healthy lifestyles. When there are class parties there are healthy treats brought in, we do a candy exchange at Halloween (they get to pick a cheap toy), when we have hot lunches (2 times a year) they are healthy with all 4 food groups covered. They do random exercises during the day (do 10 jumping jacks and then get back to work as an example). The test the grade 5 class every year (when they take the weight, the kids do not see anything, it is hooked up to see in another room and they do a survey. The information is then averaged. Before the program started 3 years ago, 0% of the kids were getting 5 servings of fruits/vegetables a day, 5% were getting 1 hour of exercise/day (they have 30 minutes of phys ed daily), 60% spent 2+ hours on computer/tv/video games. In the past 3 years there has been a steady improvement.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ethanwinfield View Post

    Why is weight still the elephant in the room?
    On a personal note, would your children's classmates care? Around here chunky seems to be the norm. But no one seems to notice or care.
    No one wants to be singled out for their weight. Young or not. I also know a few girls who are overweight. In each case the girl eats no differently than the rest of their family. It is just how they were made. They also have each been called fat and picked on for their weight. It is a very real problem.

    Obese And Overweight Teenagers More Likely To Have Considered Suicide
    Teens Who Think They’re Overweight More Likely To Try Suicide
    Body Image Issues And Teen Suicide - CBS News

    It would be far more beneficial to work time into the day for physical exercise and education on nutrition then to make kids who already feel really bad about themselves feel worse.

    ~Bonita~

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