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  1. #11
    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
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    We're limited to container gardening and things that do well in cooler weather so mostly some lettuce mix, herbs, strawberries, flowers including some edibles, chives & green onions. I think my DH has finally accepted that tomatoes will not grow here, even the "fog lover" variety he tried last year. One thing new this year is that we had a potato sprout in our compost bin -- it already had a bunch of little potaotes when we dug it up! It seems to have survived being transplanted to a large container so we'll see it it keeps growing.
    AlyssaEimers likes this.
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  2. #12
    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
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    I am getting this!!
    Greenhouses | Greenhouses-Miniature | Plant Inn, Mini Greenhouse | B649466 - GlobalIndustrial.ca
    It serves several purposes for me. First, I can go organic without having to dig out my non-organic lawn; second, my plants will be warm and protected from any last minute frost or snow we tend to get here in this God-forsaken semi-arid, sub-tundra part of the country; and third, those effing rabbits can get at my veggies or bedding plants.

    I forgot that I'm doing herbs too. Must have chives and basil. Every new recipe I try it seems calls for fresh basil. In the grocery store all I can get is a little package of three little sprigs. I also did rosemary in the front garden last year and the smell was heavenly. I hope it will come back again this year. I make a lot of stock for soups and I need herbs for the bouquet garni that I throw in the stock pot. This beats having to run to the store just for herbs a couple times a week.
    Last edited by ClairesMommy; 04-15-2013 at 02:47 PM.

  3. #13
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    How nice! I am very excited about my garden this year. Like cooking, I did not learn anything about gardening growing up and everything I have learned has been trial and err and from the internet. Each year I have gotten better, and I am hoping this year to really get some good things.

    ~Bonita~

  4. #14
    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClairesMommy View Post
    I am getting this!!
    Greenhouses | Greenhouses-Miniature | Plant Inn, Mini Greenhouse | B649466 - GlobalIndustrial.ca
    It serves several purposes for me. First, I can go organic without having to dig out my non-organic lawn; second, my plants will be warm and protected from any last minute frost or snow we tend to get here in this God-forsaken semi-arid, sub-tundra part of the country; and third, those effing rabbits can get at my veggies or bedding plants.

    I forgot that I'm doing herbs too. Must have chives and basil. Every new recipe I try it seems calls for fresh basil. In the grocery store all I can get is a little package of three little sprigs. I also did rosemary in the front garden last year and the smell was heavenly. I hope it will come back again this year. I make a lot of stock for soups and I need herbs for the bouquet garni that I throw in the stock pot. This beats having to run to the store just for herbs a couple times a week.
    Rosemary grows very easily indoors over the winter. Leave a branch of it alone for a couple of weeks so it gets a bit woody first, then cut off about 6 inches, peel the leaves off the bottom 2 inches, dip it in rooting compound, and put into a very well-draining mix with lots of (what is that stuff? I said perlite, but I think that retains moisture) or even just sand (put a screen or coffee filter over the hole to keep the sand from draining out.) Keep it really moist until the plants are well-established, then let it dry out some and start watering as normal, which for a rosemary you need to let it dry out some in between waterings. And repot it into well-draining mix if you're rooting it in sand, when it takes off.
    Last edited by Spacers; 04-15-2013 at 07:51 PM.
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  5. #15
    Posting Addict SID081108's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    Rosemary grows very easily indoors over the winter. Leave a branch of it alone for a couple of weeks so it gets a bit woody first, then cut off about 6 inches, peel the leaves off the bottom 2 inches, dip it in rooting compound, and put into a very well-draining mix with lots of (what is that stuff? I said perlite, but I think that retains moisture) or even just sand (put a screen or coffee filter over the hole to keep the sand from draining out.) Keep it really moist until the plants are well-established, then let it dry out some and start watering as normal, which for a rosemary you need to let it dry out some in between waterings. And repot it into well-draining mix if you're rooting it in sand, when it takes off.
    You have no idea how complicated this sounds to someone with no green thumb. lol

    But I am intrigued! I would love to have fresh herbs grown at home.
    CARRIE and DH 7/14/07
    SOPHIA 8/11/08
    LAYLA 3/24/11


  6. #16
    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    Rosemary grows very easily indoors over the winter. Leave a branch of it alone for a couple of weeks so it gets a bit woody first, then cut off about 6 inches, peel the leaves off the bottom 2 inches, dip it in rooting compound, and put into a very well-draining mix with lots of (what is that stuff? I said perlite, but I think that retains moisture) or even just sand (put a screen or coffee filter over the hole to keep the sand from draining out.) Keep it really moist until the plants are well-established, then let it dry out some and start watering as normal, which for a rosemary you need to let it dry out some in between waterings. And repot it into well-draining mix if you're rooting it in sand, when it takes off.
    Thanks for the tips Stacey

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