Fluff - garden

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AlyssaEimers's picture
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6561
Fluff - garden

If you were going to plant a garden, what would you plant?

ClairesMommy's picture
Joined: 08/15/06
Posts: 2299

If we're talking veggies I would plant tomatoes, beans, peas, radishes, carrots and cucumbers. If I lived on a farm I would plant everything I could, except for squash and turnip because I can't stand those. As far as flowers go I have a pretty good mix on the go but I can't remember the names of the stuff I have planted except for the irises. I'd love some climbing roses but they don't do well here.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6561

I had veggies in mind Smile I have extra garden space, so I was wondering what you all think are the "Must Haves".

ange84's picture
Joined: 12/28/09
Posts: 6564

Watermelon to save me on some money. Other than that tomato, spinach, capsicum, beans, strawberries, zuchhini, cucumber

Joined: 11/28/06
Posts: 848

This year we planted tomatoes, strawberries, eggplant, jalapenos, and culantro.

Joined: 08/17/04
Posts: 2226

We haven't planted yet...too cold but we're doing tomatoes, green beans, cucumbers, cantaloupe, green peppers and I think we have blueberry and strawberry plants to transplant. We are rehauling our garden.

Flower wise, I have a bunch of flower gardens. I'm a sucker for all lilies so I have a lot of those. I saw a daffodil pop up and my Black Iris popped out of the ground.

fuchsiasky's picture
Joined: 11/16/07
Posts: 955

I am thinking about gardening this summer. Our old house had terrible soil so I gave up, but the new house might be better. There are already some flowers and raspberries. My mom gave me some strawberries and herbs which I will add. I would love to do some veggies - maybe lettuces and tomatoes. I used to have a huge cherry tomato patch and I want another one!

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
Posts: 1535

We plant tomatoes (4 varieties) cucumber, bell peppers (all four colors) lettuce, zucchini, spaghetti squash, corn, and then I have a raised bed with watermelon, cantaloupe and honey dew. I also have pots near the house with strawberry, raspberry, and blueberry

ClairesMommy's picture
Joined: 08/15/06
Posts: 2299

At our old house we had raspberry bushes like the plague. It was too much of a good thing. We couldn't kill them either. They just kept coming back. I could easily pick enough berries to make several dozen jars of jam.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6561

Great ideas. Thank you. I have one more empty raised bed. Thinking either, blueberries and strawberries, or Pumpkins and watermelon.

Spacers's picture
Joined: 12/29/03
Posts: 4100

We're limited to container gardening and things that do well in cooler weather so mostly some lettuce mix, herbs, strawberries, flowers including some edibles, chives & green onions. I think my DH has finally accepted that tomatoes will not grow here, even the "fog lover" variety he tried last year. One thing new this year is that we had a potato sprout in our compost bin -- it already had a bunch of little potaotes when we dug it up! It seems to have survived being transplanted to a large container so we'll see it it keeps growing.

ClairesMommy's picture
Joined: 08/15/06
Posts: 2299

I am getting this!!
Greenhouses | Greenhouses-Miniature | Plant Inn, Mini Greenhouse | B649466 - GlobalIndustrial.ca
It serves several purposes for me. First, I can go organic without having to dig out my non-organic lawn; second, my plants will be warm and protected from any last minute frost or snow we tend to get here in this God-forsaken semi-arid, sub-tundra part of the country; and third, those effing rabbits can get at my veggies or bedding plants.

I forgot that I'm doing herbs too. Must have chives and basil. Every new recipe I try it seems calls for fresh basil. In the grocery store all I can get is a little package of three little sprigs. I also did rosemary in the front garden last year and the smell was heavenly. I hope it will come back again this year. I make a lot of stock for soups and I need herbs for the bouquet garni that I throw in the stock pot. This beats having to run to the store just for herbs a couple times a week.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6561

How nice! I am very excited about my garden this year. Like cooking, I did not learn anything about gardening growing up and everything I have learned has been trial and err and from the internet. Each year I have gotten better, and I am hoping this year to really get some good things.

Spacers's picture
Joined: 12/29/03
Posts: 4100

"ClairesMommy" wrote:

I am getting this!!
Greenhouses | Greenhouses-Miniature | Plant Inn, Mini Greenhouse | B649466 - GlobalIndustrial.ca
It serves several purposes for me. First, I can go organic without having to dig out my non-organic lawn; second, my plants will be warm and protected from any last minute frost or snow we tend to get here in this God-forsaken semi-arid, sub-tundra part of the country; and third, those effing rabbits can get at my veggies or bedding plants.

I forgot that I'm doing herbs too. Must have chives and basil. Every new recipe I try it seems calls for fresh basil. In the grocery store all I can get is a little package of three little sprigs. I also did rosemary in the front garden last year and the smell was heavenly. I hope it will come back again this year. I make a lot of stock for soups and I need herbs for the bouquet garni that I throw in the stock pot. This beats having to run to the store just for herbs a couple times a week.

Rosemary grows very easily indoors over the winter. Leave a branch of it alone for a couple of weeks so it gets a bit woody first, then cut off about 6 inches, peel the leaves off the bottom 2 inches, dip it in rooting compound, and put into a very well-draining mix with lots of (what is that stuff? I said perlite, but I think that retains moisture) or even just sand (put a screen or coffee filter over the hole to keep the sand from draining out.) Keep it really moist until the plants are well-established, then let it dry out some and start watering as normal, which for a rosemary you need to let it dry out some in between waterings. And repot it into well-draining mix if you're rooting it in sand, when it takes off.

SID081108's picture
Joined: 06/03/09
Posts: 1348

"Spacers" wrote:

Rosemary grows very easily indoors over the winter. Leave a branch of it alone for a couple of weeks so it gets a bit woody first, then cut off about 6 inches, peel the leaves off the bottom 2 inches, dip it in rooting compound, and put into a very well-draining mix with lots of (what is that stuff? I said perlite, but I think that retains moisture) or even just sand (put a screen or coffee filter over the hole to keep the sand from draining out.) Keep it really moist until the plants are well-established, then let it dry out some and start watering as normal, which for a rosemary you need to let it dry out some in between waterings. And repot it into well-draining mix if you're rooting it in sand, when it takes off.

You have no idea how complicated this sounds to someone with no green thumb. lol

But I am intrigued! I would love to have fresh herbs grown at home.

ClairesMommy's picture
Joined: 08/15/06
Posts: 2299

"Spacers" wrote:

Rosemary grows very easily indoors over the winter. Leave a branch of it alone for a couple of weeks so it gets a bit woody first, then cut off about 6 inches, peel the leaves off the bottom 2 inches, dip it in rooting compound, and put into a very well-draining mix with lots of (what is that stuff? I said perlite, but I think that retains moisture) or even just sand (put a screen or coffee filter over the hole to keep the sand from draining out.) Keep it really moist until the plants are well-established, then let it dry out some and start watering as normal, which for a rosemary you need to let it dry out some in between waterings. And repot it into well-draining mix if you're rooting it in sand, when it takes off.

Thanks for the tips Stacey Smile