Fluff - Print or Cursive

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AlyssaEimers's picture
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Fluff - Print or Cursive

Do you write in Print or Cursive? Do you feel there is still great value in nice cursive handwriting?

Joined: 08/17/04
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I go back and forth...depends on the day. I write faster in cursive though.

It's a dying form. Moving along with the times. I think it will become something that people will do like calligraphy but not the norm for everyday usage.

ClairesMommy's picture
Joined: 08/15/06
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As I am old school, I will cry the day cursive is officially extinct from everyday life. Some say there's no use for it but I disagree. My signature is part of my identity. Signatures are unique and IMO, necessary for important for the validation of certain documents. Maybe I should have like this big paradigm shift and all and just get over it, but it bugs the he!! out of me. Maybe my kids won't care so much, but since I'm teaching them cursive no matter what the curriculum stipulates I hope that they will care enough to take pride in learning how to write with it. To me, cursive is beautiful and eloquent and I don't care if its use is diminishing. For me it still holds value.

Joined: 03/08/03
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I write in cursive a lot but I just noticed I do most of my capital letters in print instead. Funny.

ClairesMommy's picture
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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

I write in cursive a lot but I just noticed I do most of my capital letters in print instead. Funny.

Me too. My lowercase b's, in cursive, I just do them like printed b's but joined, KWIM? Lowercase cursive b's just look weird to me. I think I gave them up in highschool.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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This is hotly debated on some of the homeschool forums. I write in a mixture of mostly cursive with some print mixed in. I think it is important to learn how to write in cursive and especially how to read cursive, but I do not think hours upon hours a day need to be spent on it.

ETA - Times when I think you would use cursive. Taking notes in college, writing Christmas cards, writing thank you notes, writing wedding invitations, signing your name, writing notes to your child's teacher, love notes, and a variety of other circumstances. I also think it is very important to be able to read all of those things that are in cursive. Also restaurant menus, historical documents, and contracts.

ClairesMommy's picture
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I didn't spend hours and hours a day on it when I was in school either. It was part of our usual Spelling requirement and was like no big deal. Just another subject. And trust me, as one of the older gals here I probably had more cursive instruction at school compared to the others. Once we had printing mastered it was onto cursive, but it was at the very most no more than an hour out of the day and that's being very generous. Are you saying you mix cursive with printing in your normal writing? Like, if you were writing a letter or a note or something you would use cursive and printing? I use one or the other, depending on what I'm doing.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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"ClairesMommy" wrote:

I didn't spend hours and hours a day on it when I was in school either. It was part of our usual Spelling requirement and was like no big deal. Just another subject. And trust me, as one of the older gals here I probably had more cursive instruction at school compared to the others. Once we had printing mastered it was onto cursive, but it was at the very most no more than an hour out of the day and that's being very generous. Are you saying you mix cursive with printing in your normal writing? Like, if you were writing a letter or a note or something you would use cursive and printing? I use one or the other, depending on what I'm doing.

I was not being literal when I said hours a day. Sorry.

A mixture in the same word.

Joined: 03/08/03
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I agree, kids should be taught to write in cursive and especially to read it. It wasn't a big deal when I was a kid, we just learned it along with everything else.

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
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We had a big debate about this at a teaching conference a few years back, with the question being raised "Do we teach cursive or do we spend more time on computer skills" Each school came away with their own answers but the school I teach at stuck with teaching cursive. We spend very little time on it, they learn it over a 3 year period between 3 and 5th grade. As a school we decided that it needed to be taught, even if the kids didnt have perfect handwriting. They start keyboarding in 1st grade so I think they will all be pretty well rounded.

I use printing most of the time, as the kids I teach are little. But recently I wrote a letter and remembered how much I love cursive

ftmom's picture
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I always always print. I have always hated cursive writing. I do love the way it looks though. I know I stopped using it as soon as we were allowed to do so in school. My DD is desperate to learn it though (she can barely print right now), so I hope she gets a chance to in school. I would have a heck of a time trying to teach her at home.

ange84's picture
Joined: 12/28/09
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A mix of both all at once.

"ClairesMommy" wrote:

A My signature is part of my identity. Signatures are unique and IMO, necessary for important for the validation of certain documents.

Here they seem to be ok with not validating signatures. The credit companies now allow whats called pay wave where you just tap your card on the eftpos machine and for up to certain amounts ( the most I know of is $100 at grocery stores) no validation is required. That tap and you've paid and that is it take your goods and go. You can still use the card the traditional way, but so many people I talk to prefer tap and go

Joined: 05/31/06
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I always print. Haven't used cursive since middle school. I wouldn't mind at all if my kids did not learn to use cursive. My print is neat and distinctive, I like it.

Joined: 03/14/09
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I always use cursive. I will teach both my kids cursive. I am a much faster cursive writer than printer.

My grandmothers both had beautiful handwriting. Getting a note from them in their classy handwriting was such an event for me. Even their grocery lists were like art. I wish my handwriting was that nice.

Also, in the country I now live in, the writing changed after WWII, and now regular people cannot read cursive from before that era. Getting a history degree requires at least a year of study on the old cursive. I hate to think that will happen to English as well.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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"ange84" wrote:

A mix of both all at once.

Here they seem to be ok with not validating signatures. The credit companies now allow whats called pay wave where you just tap your card on the eftpos machine and for up to certain amounts ( the most I know of is $100 at grocery stores) no validation is required. That tap and you've paid and that is it take your goods and go. You can still use the card the traditional way, but so many people I talk to prefer tap and go

What about signing for a mortgage or marriage licence? Are you just able to print?

ClairesMommy's picture
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"ange84" wrote:

A mix of both all at once.

Here they seem to be ok with not validating signatures. The credit companies now allow whats called pay wave where you just tap your card on the eftpos machine and for up to certain amounts ( the most I know of is $100 at grocery stores) no validation is required. That tap and you've paid and that is it take your goods and go. You can still use the card the traditional way, but so many people I talk to prefer tap and go

I'm not talking about tapping a debit or credit card. I'm talking about signing stuff like loan/mortgage documents, bank accounts, employment contracts, driver's licenses, etc.

Joined: 05/31/06
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Do you know many men who sign legal documents in flowery cursive signatures? I don't. Why does a woman's have to be different? Mines an up and down sort of scribble - my husbands is totally illegible as his actual name- as is my dad and many ither guys i know. .....always works just fine.

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"Potter75" wrote:

Do you know many men who sign legal documents in flowery cursive signatures? I don't. Why does a woman's have to be different? Mines an up and down sort of scribble - my husbands is totally illegible as his actual name- as is my dad and many ither guys i know. .....always works just fine.

Most people I know (including me) have a fairly illegible but distinctive scribble. Mine's in cursive but it's not really something anyone else could read.

I still have my passport from when I was nine with my very cute cursive signature.

Joined: 04/12/03
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"ClairesMommy" wrote:

As I am old school, I will cry the day cursive is officially extinct from everyday life. Some say there's no use for it but I disagree. My signature is part of my identity. Signatures are unique and IMO, necessary for important for the validation of certain documents. Maybe I should have like this big paradigm shift and all and just get over it, but it bugs the he!! out of me. Maybe my kids won't care so much, but since I'm teaching them cursive no matter what the curriculum stipulates I hope that they will care enough to take pride in learning how to write with it. To me, cursive is beautiful and eloquent and I don't care if its use is diminishing. For me it still holds value.

"ClairesMommy" wrote:

I'm not talking about tapping a debit or credit card. I'm talking about signing stuff like loan/mortgage documents, bank accounts, employment contracts, driver's licenses, etc.

Many of my Hispanic students' parents do not use cursive. Their signatures are still unique and valid signatures for legal documents. On all of the documents you mentioned someone watched me sign the document and in the case of mortgage, my signature was notarized. (First employment contract was witnessed but not since then.)

ftmom's picture
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I sign my name just like everyone else. It is so illegible that I never bothered to change how I sign when I got married and changed my name Smile When I was a teen I worked in a restaurant where we had to sign or initial EVERYTHING and my signature just got messier and messier!

Spacers's picture
Joined: 12/29/03
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I love cursive. I do use some print letters -- the capital S in my first name, lowercase Z, any Q --because the print versions just look better to me. I do think cursive needs to be taught in schools because there are and will always be occasions when one needs to write, not type on a keyboard or device, and it is so much faster & easier than printing for most people. My sister almost exclusively prints because her handwriting is atrocious & no one can read it, but she chose to do that rather than try to improve her handwriting. And I think it's important to learn for the historical context. I wouldn't spend hours a day on it, but I think kids should learn it. Tiven's last two report projects were required to be written in cursive and she was so proud of herself that she didn't have to rewrite either of them because she formed all of her letters the correct way!

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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

Most people I know (including me) have a fairly illegible but distinctive scribble. Mine's in cursive but it's not really something anyone else could read.

I still have my passport from when I was nine with my very cute cursive signature.

I always joke that my husband signs with an X because it's a completely illegible scrawl that looks a little bit like an elaborate X. I still sign my first name in legible cursive, and the first half of my last name, but somehow the last half of my last name faded into a kind of bumpy line. Which is where I got my user name for this forum, incidentally.

ange84's picture
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My husband signs with an absolute scribble, I have tried at home mucking around and can sign a scribble that looks enough the same as his. Mine is in cursive though when I am doing large court documents the end starts to trail off a bit after about 100 pages.

I have many clients ( many with low literacy levels) who sign official documents with print I have seen many with just a first name as well and this has sufficed on official documents.

GloriaInTX's picture
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I think it is sad that some schools aren't even teaching cursive anymore. Even if you don't use it often I think it is something that everyone should know how to read and write. I tend to use a mixture of both.

Joined: 05/31/06
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Why sad? Is the disuse of the abacus sad? I don't get an emotional attachment- very strange to me.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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It does not make sense to think less information or skill is good. If you learn cursive, then no harm is done. A few years spent on learning a skill that could prove useful later on. However if you do not learn cursive, there could be many times that you regret that.

ETA - Think of how many people on this board said they write in cursive? Do you not want your child read that many people's handwriting?

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

It does not make sense to think less information or skill is good. If you learn cursive, then no harm is done. A few years spent on learning a skill that could prove useful later on. However if you do not learn cursive, there could be many times that you regret that.

ETA - Think of how many people on this board said they write in cursive? Do you not want your child read that many people's handwriting?

How many handwritten notes do you receive? At school literally 100% of papers/assignments etc are in print. In the workforce communication takes place via email. What is the actual practical concern? Their peer group and colleagues will be printing. My friends print, my siblings and friends mostly print. It's just not some real world fear I have. I'm fine with that time being applied to forward thinking and applicable skills. If they can't read great aunt Hilda's birthday card, I can help. It does not make sense to use an abacus- so for you to act like cursive is some "OMG" you are so illogical for seeing it as unnecessary is just ridiculous. You want to homeschool hours on if? Great! I'm glad my kids will not be wasting hours on it.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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"Potter75" wrote:

How many handwritten notes do you receive? At school literally 100% of papers/assignments etc are in print. In the workforce communication takes place via email. What is the actual practical concern? Their peer group and colleagues will be printing. My friends print, my siblings and friends mostly print. It's just not some real world fear I have. I'm fine with that time being applied to forward thinking and applicable skills. If they can't read great aunt Hilda's birthday card, I can help.

Will you be around and nearby for your children's entire life? I can understand maybe thinking it is a waste to write cursive, but I have not come across anyone who does not think you should at least be able to read it.

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Its not like its Chinese. Do you really think most reasonably intelligent people can't figure it out? That surprises me. I trust their intelligence enough to know they will be able to read it. No one ever "taught" me to read elaborate styles of calligraphy - but I can quite easily.

plus- great aunt Hilda won't be around either Smile cursive is dying, just like she will.

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mommytoMR.FACE's picture
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I was so so so excited to learn cursive in 2nd grade; I still have my cursive learning book.

I mostly print though my letters end up connected in some way so I guess I use a mix. I sign my name in cursive, or with just a wavy line if I am in a rush.

Jace tries to write in cursive because he thinks it looks cool, lol. I wish they still taught it but I don't find it a necessary life skill.

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

Why can’t 19 year old Rachel Jeantel read cursive? | politics from the eyes of an ebony mom

Yeah. Honestly my kids have a lot more advantages than this poor girl. Again- teach it to your kids! But please don't feel sorry for mine Smile I guarantee you they have every advantage.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

Do you write in Print or Cursive? Do you feel there is still great value in nice cursive handwriting?

I feel that there is value in nice cursive handwriting. I do not feel anyone is going to shrivel up and die if they can't, but I do think it is a nice skill to have.

Joined: 05/31/06
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So is needlepoint. Fire walking. Or the ability to give bikini waxes. I'm not yet to see a reason why cursive is in any way an educationally valuable or marketable tool. Maybe I'm missing something? Does it in some way enhance eye/hand coordination or make some mental link or something? I've never researched it. I admit to totally loving the historical beauty of my grandmothers handwriting.........but I truly believe that my grandchildren are going to look at my handwriting (when they can find it!) and love it as it too is periodic, IMO.

Joined: 03/14/09
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"Potter75" wrote:

Why sad? Is the disuse of the abacus sad? I don't get an emotional attachment- very strange to me.

Yes! My son is using the abacus in his first grade class, he also used it in kindergarten. Using an abacus and other tactile tools for math give kids a really good grounding in basic math- the kind of background that kids need if they are going to study physics, chemistry, medicine, pharmacy, cooking, computer science, etc. But most importantly to me is that it gives that background to people who might not be good at math that is just written or aural. Teaching math with an abacus or other tactile tools helps the kids who need it most. Not to mention it is fun. Smile I like doing my son's abacus homework with him, it's new for me too as I didn't grow up with it either. Kids learn through fun, and I wish North American schools included the abacus in primary school.

"Potter75" wrote:

Do you know many men who sign legal documents in flowery cursive signatures? I don't. Why does a woman's have to be different? Mines an up and down sort of scribble - my husbands is totally illegible as his actual name- as is my dad and many ither guys i know. .....always works just fine.

Flowery? No. Beautiful? Yes. The handwriting taught in Europe before the 90s was gorgeous, and I can remember some professors with unbelievably beautiful handwriting. In England our headmaster wrote a quote on the blackboard before morning assembly and it was like looking at one of those great font signs. He was still pretty manly. Smile

"Potter75" wrote:

So is needlepoint. Fire walking. Or the ability to give bikini waxes. I'm not yet to see a reason why cursive is in any way an educationally valuable or marketable tool. Maybe I'm missing something? Does it in some way enhance eye/hand coordination or make some mental link or something? I've never researched it. I admit to totally loving the historical beauty of my grandmothers handwriting.........but I truly believe that my grandchildren are going to look at my handwriting (when they can find it!) and love it as it too is periodic, IMO.

Cursive does indeed enhance hand-eye coordination, as well as functional specialization. It is a catalyst for development of certain spatial elements in the brain. Yes, printing does some, but cursive takes it to a higher level, just like painting takes sketching skills to a higher level. Many schools with a lot of at-risk children have very little time or money for music or art (which is definitely a shame!), but cursive is a step in that direction and fires many of the same synapses. It can be done much more economically than art, so it can reach every kid.

Cursive also opens brain patterns to learning other languages later in life, like Russian or Arabic, which are always in a cursive-ish form. Cursive helped me with learning languages, it helps with writing Chinese characters because the rules for forming characters are the same, although much more rigid in Chinese.

It's sad to me that in primary school we are thinking about what kind of work kids will be doing and focussing only on that. I think primary should be about developing cognitive function and learning how to learn.

That being said, I use cursive a lot in my everyday work. When I do quality assurance I am checking data and need to read people's handwriting from all over the world, in every shape, as even if the data is printed, correction for audit trails is done in handwriting. When I interpret, I need to take notes, and a PDA or cell phone is still not as fast or as easy and unobtrusive as a pad of paper and pen and quick hand. I'm sure that will change but handwriting isn't dead yet.

Joined: 05/31/06
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So much sadness! I'm truly floored that you of all people would argue that all children must learn the same way! I disagree. I'm quite thrilled with my older kids progress with reading and writing- without boring everyone with specifics they are well ahead of the game. Of course if their lack of cursive somehow seems to be holding them back I'm sure we could hire a tutor. I think that generations of amazing creators, innovators etc managed to not just succeed, but thrive even, without proficiency in English cursive- I have confidence my children can too.

((hugs)) for everyone feeling sad today about cursive. Its also ironic that you find it sad that i apply the future value of learning when you talk about applying the abacus to physics, medicine etc...... surely you mean you too are thinking anout the future? I don't find that sad or judge you for that- I think that determining value is simply good parenting. Judge away though if it makes you feel better! to enjoy the holiday anyway! Smile

forgive typos on stairclimber

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Am I the only one who also finds cursive convenient? I write more quickly, whether I'm taking notes or writing creatively. I type faster than I write, so that's always preferred, but if I'm writing, then printing takes much too long.

ClairesMommy's picture
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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

Am I the only one who also finds cursive convenient? I write more quickly, whether I'm taking notes or writing creatively. I type faster than I write, so that's always preferred, but if I'm writing, then printing takes much too long.

I am the same. When I have to write I use cursive. For me it's way faster than printing.

Joined: 05/13/02
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I think I'm slower writing in cursive. My cursive was never very good, so I have to go back and think about how to write some of the letters....as embarrassing as it is to admit that. My mother's cursive is almost impossible to read, and it's always been that way. My boys have learned cursive in school, and can read most people's cursive handwriting. But whenever my mom gives them cards I have to translate what is says for them.

KimPossible's picture
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Random thoughts on the subject:

I'm much faster writing in cursive than I am at printing.

I don't think cursive is a necessity for signatures. I think the huge majority of signatures only resemble handwriting but are pretty illegible. Cursive is definitely not vital to having a signature.

I don't think its simple to 'just figure it out' without it being taught. I remember not being able to read cursive until i was taught it and I think thats pretty common.

I'm glad they still teach it at my kids school. I think there is a difference between how my daughter learned it at the private Catholic school and how my kids at the public school are learning it. There was a lot of emphasis on it at the Catholic school. At our public school i think there is less focus on it. I think its taught there because it is still used, just not used much and they acknowledge that its dying. So its kind of like "here, you should be able to read this...we are going to teach you how to read and write it but don't really give a crap if its perfect"

Cursive isn't completely gone, so for that reason, i think kids should have at least the basics. But i don't think there is a need to include anything more beyond that as part of a standard curriculum. I don't agree with not teaching it at all at this point.

All the stuff that Jen mentioned is fascinating to me. So in that sense it does make me sad that it is a dying art form. Not sit alone crying in my room sad. Sad only because those benefits sound great to me, but i find it highly unlikely we will easily find resources down the road that will include cursive for enrichment purposes. Maybe I'm wrong and it will find its niche somewhere. That would be a nice compromise to me.

Spacers's picture
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"blather" wrote:

Cursive does indeed enhance hand-eye coordination, as well as functional specialization. It is a catalyst for development of certain spatial elements in the brain. Yes, printing does some, but cursive takes it to a higher level, just like painting takes sketching skills to a higher level. Many schools with a lot of at-risk children have very little time or money for music or art (which is definitely a shame!), but cursive is a step in that direction and fires many of the same synapses. It can be done much more economically than art, so it can reach every kid.

Cursive also opens brain patterns to learning other languages later in life, like Russian or Arabic, which are always in a cursive-ish form. Cursive helped me with learning languages, it helps with writing Chinese characters because the rules for forming characters are the same, although much more rigid in Chinese.

It's sad to me that in primary school we are thinking about what kind of work kids will be doing and focussing only on that. I think primary should be about developing cognitive function and learning how to learn.

Yes, ITA with all of this!

Melissa, aren't your kids still pretty young, your oldest is 6yo? It makes sense that they aren't learning cursive yet, but they might in years/grades to come. It's taught in third grade here.

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lol yes-I'm aware that they dont teach cursive in kindy. It's not taught in my district and has pretty much been abandoned in the tri state area.

KimPossible's picture
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"Potter75" wrote:

lol yes-I'm aware that they dont teach cursive in kindy. It's not taught in my district and has pretty much been abandoned in the tri state area.

are you sure the second statement is accurate?

Recent articles suggest that the national rates are a lot higher than that. I have a hard time imagining one of the most densely populated areas in the nation has gotten to a level that could be described as abandonment.

Survey shows cursive, on the decline, is taught in many classrooms nationwide - Washington Post

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Yep!

KimPossible's picture
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"Potter75" wrote:

Yep!

Pardon my skepticism on that point as i don't think recent info on the subject supports that claim. I guess i have a hard time believing that you are fully aware of the curriculum in that many public schools in the area to know for certain if that statement was accurate. I only think its important to point out because while its no longer officially required in a lot of places, i think the fact that so many schools are still teaching it speaks a lot for where we are at the moment, and i don't think its good to portray it as if we are that far down the path of trending away from it. Not in a 'bigger life picture' kind of way, but for the 'sake of debate' kind of way.

KimPossible's picture
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llama

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Okay!

KimPossible's picture
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okay...so.....anyway. Yeah cursive. I think i would feel better about them not teaching it at all when i felt like it was completely dead. In my original message i said that i felt that the school where my kids are...was trying to teach it so that they could handle it when they encountered it, not to encourage its use. Which i think is the right way to go. Although after reading a couple of articles on the subject, it seems that they will unlikely retain the information unless they spend more time on it. So in that case its not very useful.

So i don't know...i guess its not very useful to teach it if they won't even retain it....which leaves me a little more undecided. I don't want to spend tons of time focused on the subject, but too little is pointless. But i think back to my days learning cursive...i don't really think that we spent that much time learning it for it to stick.

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"KimPossible" wrote:

okay...so.....anyway. Yeah cursive. I think i would feel better about them not teaching it at all when i felt like it was completely dead. In my original message i said that i felt that the school where my kids are...was trying to teach it so that they could handle it when they encountered it, not to encourage its use. Which i think is the right way to go. Although after reading a couple of articles on the subject, it seems that they will unlikely retain the information unless they spend more time on it. So in that case its not very useful.

So i don't know...i guess its not very useful to teach it if they won't even retain it....which leaves me a little more undecided. I don't want to spend tons of time focused on the subject, but too little is pointless. But i think back to my days learning cursive...i don't really think that we spent that much time learning it for it to stick.

I was out, so forgive my brief reply, but I don't really know how to argue that our curriculum is what it is if you simply don't believe me. And the stats from the article you posted weren't so compelling as to make me look like a liar (what on earth do I have to gain from lying???) IMO. If it isn't part of the curriculum but teachers have some heartfelt desire or longing to teach cursive so spend some cursory amount of time on it........what is that really achieving, at the end of the day? And maybe its bad parenting of me to be concerned with the effectiveness of my kids education for the future, but I do. I'm okay with that. I agree with this comment from the article you posted. My print is also linked like they describe in this comment, I write that way MUCH faster than if I tried to go back to cursive and remember cursive capital G's and S's and whatnot. My mom used to be a secretary and still knows how to write in shorthand. I don't see that being taught today (is it?) ~ and that is okay too. I'm very pro innovation. I fully trust that the same fine motor skills and neural pathways and all that are being met in a myriad of ways that may be different, but no less worthy, than good old cursive writing. I personally think that studying for a spelling bee without learning the meaning of the words is stupid. Likewise I think that spending time learning to write in a script that few children are learning to write in and few parents use on a regular basis is not time well spent. Thats all. If people want to invest a lot of time on it ~ GO FOR IT! I think that is great. Just like I think that its great that we don't. I'm a big believer that we don't all have to be the same.

Handwriting matters — but does cursive matter? The fastest, clearest handwriters join only some letters: making the easiest joins, skipping others, using print-like forms of letters whose cursive and printed forms disagree. (Sources on request.)

Reading cursive matters, but even children can be taught to read writing that they are not taught to produce. Reading cursive can be taught in just 30 to 60 minutes — even to five- or six-year-olds, once they read ordinary print. Why not teach children to read cursive, along with teaching other vital skills, including a handwriting style typical of effective handwriters?

Adults increasingly abandon cursive. In 2012, handwriting teachers were surveyed at a conference hosted by Zaner-Bloser, a publisher of cursive textbooks. Only 37 percent wrote in cursive; another 8 percent printed. The majority, 55 percent, wrote a hybrid: some elements resembling print-writing, others resembling cursive. When most handwriting teachers shun cursive, why mandate it?

Cursive's cheerleaders sometimes allege that cursive makes you smarter, makes you graceful, or confers other blessings no more prevalent among cursive users than elsewhere. Some claim research support, citing studies that consistently prove to have been misquoted or otherwise misrepresented by the claimant.

What about signatures? In state and federal law, cursive signatures have no special legal validity over any other kind. (Hard to believe? Ask any attorney!)

All writing, not just cursive, is individual — just as all writing involves fine motor skills. That is why, six months into the school year, any first-grade teacher can immediately identify (from print-writing on unsigned work) which student produced it.

Mandating cursive to preserve handwriting resembles mandating stovepipe hats and crinolines to preserve the art of tailoring.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

Hogwarts

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"Potter75" wrote:

I was out, so forgive my brief reply, but I don't really know how to argue that our curriculum is what it is if you simply don't believe me. And the stats from the article you posted weren't so compelling as to make me look like a liar (what on earth do I have to gain from lying???) IMO.

I don't think you would choose to lie...i simply question what you are basing your belief on. I don't question that you believe it. And of course I believe you that your school district doesn't teach cursive. Its this statement that I questioned:

and has pretty much been abandoned in the tri state area.

Thats a lot of school districts to know about.

Anyway, i don't think its bad parenting to not want ones kids to learn cursive...i actually think there is a point where we really won't need to teach it at all. I'm just saying I don't feel comfortable at this point saying that we've reached that point in time. I'd like to see it really gone from all aspects of life before i said 'its time'. If i thought there was no chance of my kids receiving a cursive written letter during their adulthood, i'd probably not care. Is it a huge deal to not be able to read some things here or there? No...I think its a lot better if they could.

And I think this notion that its taking away from precious time learning other things is a bit exaggerated in my opinion. I think to teach it and retain it...three years somewhere between the grades of 3 and 6 are probably enough to actually learn it and retain it. I look at my daughter's education so far and just can't see myself, years ahead when she's graduating from high school being that concerned that her education was somehow hurt by spending those hours way back then learning cursive.. Or that it would prevent her from being innovative, a forward thinker or deter her from being interested in modern technology or something. I just don't see it, for her or any other kid. Not worried about that.

In the end, i really think its no big deal whichever side of the argument you stand on. It comes down to a piddly preference.

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