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Thread: Fluff - Print or Cursive

  1. #31
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    I was so so so excited to learn cursive in 2nd grade; I still have my cursive learning book.

    I mostly print though my letters end up connected in some way so I guess I use a mix. I sign my name in cursive, or with just a wavy line if I am in a rush.

    Jace tries to write in cursive because he thinks it looks cool, lol. I wish they still taught it but I don't find it a necessary life skill.

  2. #32
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    Yeah. Honestly my kids have a lot more advantages than this poor girl. Again- teach it to your kids! But please don't feel sorry for mine I guarantee you they have every advantage.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    Do you write in Print or Cursive? Do you feel there is still great value in nice cursive handwriting?
    I feel that there is value in nice cursive handwriting. I do not feel anyone is going to shrivel up and die if they can't, but I do think it is a nice skill to have.

    ~Bonita~

  4. #34
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    So is needlepoint. Fire walking. Or the ability to give bikini waxes. I'm not yet to see a reason why cursive is in any way an educationally valuable or marketable tool. Maybe I'm missing something? Does it in some way enhance eye/hand coordination or make some mental link or something? I've never researched it. I admit to totally loving the historical beauty of my grandmothers handwriting.........but I truly believe that my grandchildren are going to look at my handwriting (when they can find it!) and love it as it too is periodic, IMO.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Potter75 View Post
    Why sad? Is the disuse of the abacus sad? I don't get an emotional attachment- very strange to me.
    Yes! My son is using the abacus in his first grade class, he also used it in kindergarten. Using an abacus and other tactile tools for math give kids a really good grounding in basic math- the kind of background that kids need if they are going to study physics, chemistry, medicine, pharmacy, cooking, computer science, etc. But most importantly to me is that it gives that background to people who might not be good at math that is just written or aural. Teaching math with an abacus or other tactile tools helps the kids who need it most. Not to mention it is fun. I like doing my son's abacus homework with him, it's new for me too as I didn't grow up with it either. Kids learn through fun, and I wish North American schools included the abacus in primary school.

    Quote Originally Posted by Potter75 View Post
    Do you know many men who sign legal documents in flowery cursive signatures? I don't. Why does a woman's have to be different? Mines an up and down sort of scribble - my husbands is totally illegible as his actual name- as is my dad and many ither guys i know. .....always works just fine.
    Flowery? No. Beautiful? Yes. The handwriting taught in Europe before the 90s was gorgeous, and I can remember some professors with unbelievably beautiful handwriting. In England our headmaster wrote a quote on the blackboard before morning assembly and it was like looking at one of those great font signs. He was still pretty manly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Potter75 View Post
    So is needlepoint. Fire walking. Or the ability to give bikini waxes. I'm not yet to see a reason why cursive is in any way an educationally valuable or marketable tool. Maybe I'm missing something? Does it in some way enhance eye/hand coordination or make some mental link or something? I've never researched it. I admit to totally loving the historical beauty of my grandmothers handwriting.........but I truly believe that my grandchildren are going to look at my handwriting (when they can find it!) and love it as it too is periodic, IMO.
    Cursive does indeed enhance hand-eye coordination, as well as functional specialization. It is a catalyst for development of certain spatial elements in the brain. Yes, printing does some, but cursive takes it to a higher level, just like painting takes sketching skills to a higher level. Many schools with a lot of at-risk children have very little time or money for music or art (which is definitely a shame!), but cursive is a step in that direction and fires many of the same synapses. It can be done much more economically than art, so it can reach every kid.

    Cursive also opens brain patterns to learning other languages later in life, like Russian or Arabic, which are always in a cursive-ish form. Cursive helped me with learning languages, it helps with writing Chinese characters because the rules for forming characters are the same, although much more rigid in Chinese.

    It's sad to me that in primary school we are thinking about what kind of work kids will be doing and focussing only on that. I think primary should be about developing cognitive function and learning how to learn.

    That being said, I use cursive a lot in my everyday work. When I do quality assurance I am checking data and need to read people's handwriting from all over the world, in every shape, as even if the data is printed, correction for audit trails is done in handwriting. When I interpret, I need to take notes, and a PDA or cell phone is still not as fast or as easy and unobtrusive as a pad of paper and pen and quick hand. I'm sure that will change but handwriting isn't dead yet.

  6. #36
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    So much sadness! I'm truly floored that you of all people would argue that all children must learn the same way! I disagree. I'm quite thrilled with my older kids progress with reading and writing- without boring everyone with specifics they are well ahead of the game. Of course if their lack of cursive somehow seems to be holding them back I'm sure we could hire a tutor. I think that generations of amazing creators, innovators etc managed to not just succeed, but thrive even, without proficiency in English cursive- I have confidence my children can too.

    ((hugs)) for everyone feeling sad today about cursive. Its also ironic that you find it sad that i apply the future value of learning when you talk about applying the abacus to physics, medicine etc...... surely you mean you too are thinking anout the future? I don't find that sad or judge you for that- I think that determining value is simply good parenting. Judge away though if it makes you feel better! to enjoy the holiday anyway!

    forgive typos on stairclimber
    Last edited by Potter75; 07-04-2013 at 11:30 AM.

  7. #37
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    Am I the only one who also finds cursive convenient? I write more quickly, whether I'm taking notes or writing creatively. I type faster than I write, so that's always preferred, but if I'm writing, then printing takes much too long.
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  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by freddieflounder101 View Post
    Am I the only one who also finds cursive convenient? I write more quickly, whether I'm taking notes or writing creatively. I type faster than I write, so that's always preferred, but if I'm writing, then printing takes much too long.
    I am the same. When I have to write I use cursive. For me it's way faster than printing.

  9. #39
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    I think I'm slower writing in cursive. My cursive was never very good, so I have to go back and think about how to write some of the letters....as embarrassing as it is to admit that. My mother's cursive is almost impossible to read, and it's always been that way. My boys have learned cursive in school, and can read most people's cursive handwriting. But whenever my mom gives them cards I have to translate what is says for them.
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  10. #40
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    Random thoughts on the subject:

    I'm much faster writing in cursive than I am at printing.

    I don't think cursive is a necessity for signatures. I think the huge majority of signatures only resemble handwriting but are pretty illegible. Cursive is definitely not vital to having a signature.

    I don't think its simple to 'just figure it out' without it being taught. I remember not being able to read cursive until i was taught it and I think thats pretty common.

    I'm glad they still teach it at my kids school. I think there is a difference between how my daughter learned it at the private Catholic school and how my kids at the public school are learning it. There was a lot of emphasis on it at the Catholic school. At our public school i think there is less focus on it. I think its taught there because it is still used, just not used much and they acknowledge that its dying. So its kind of like "here, you should be able to read this...we are going to teach you how to read and write it but don't really give a crap if its perfect"

    Cursive isn't completely gone, so for that reason, i think kids should have at least the basics. But i don't think there is a need to include anything more beyond that as part of a standard curriculum. I don't agree with not teaching it at all at this point.

    All the stuff that Jen mentioned is fascinating to me. So in that sense it does make me sad that it is a dying art form. Not sit alone crying in my room sad. Sad only because those benefits sound great to me, but i find it highly unlikely we will easily find resources down the road that will include cursive for enrichment purposes. Maybe I'm wrong and it will find its niche somewhere. That would be a nice compromise to me.
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