Gay Cure Ban Going Up For Vote in CA
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 17 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 169
Like Tree16Likes

Thread: Gay Cure Ban Going Up For Vote in CA

  1. #1
    Community Host Alissa_Sal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Debating Away on the Debate Board!
    Posts
    11,771

    Default Gay Cure Ban Going Up For Vote in CA

    'Gay Cure' Ban Heads For Vote In California

    When James Guay was 12, he went into a Christian bookstore to look for information on what was wrong with him. He found just one book on homosexuality -- "on how to change it," he recalled. When he brought it to the counter, the clerk asked if it was for him. "She said she would pray for me," he said.


    A few years later Guay had a nervous breakdown and told his parents what was distressing him. His father, a pastor, helped him find a licensed "ex-gay" psychologist. The psychologist said he had been gay, but now was married to a woman. He told Guay that change was possible. "It was this newfound hope," Guay said. Within six months to a year, the therapist promised him, Guay could overcome his attraction to men and learn to be attracted to women.


    Two months ago, Guay testified at a hearing on a new bill in the California State Legislature that would ban the "gay cure," as this type of therapy is known. The bill is the first of its kind in the U.S., and observers expect it to pass by the end of August. If Gov. Jerry Brown (D) signs it, licensed therapists who try to change the sexual orientation of minors will run the risk of losing their licenses.


    "I wanted parents to understand that this therapy is crazy," said Sen. Ted Lieu, the California Democrat who authored the bill.


    The passage of SB 1172 would be the latest in a series of recent actions signaling a widespread condemnation of the practice. Almost all mainstream mental health organizations, from the American Psychiatric Association to the American Psychological Association, have renounced it. The World Health Organization has released a statement saying that such methods "lack medical justification and represent a serious threat to the health and well-being" of patients. Robert L. Spitzer, a psychiatrist who published a widely cited study supporting the "gay cure" practice in 2003, recently apologized for his work in the journal where the original paper appeared.


    "I believe I owe the gay community an apology," he wrote.



    For more than three decades, one of the leading forces behind the practice of attempting to change sexual orientation was Exodus International, a nonprofit group. In June, the head of Exodus International declared at its annual meeting that there was no cure for homosexuality and that the promise of one offered false hope to gays. Just a few years before, he and his wife had starred in advertisements saying, "Change is possible."


    Still, there aren't any scientific studies showing that the practice actually causes harm. Anecdotal reports of depression, even suicide, abound, and a task force convened by the American Psychological Association found the practice to be both harmful and ineffective. But when the government regulates a behavior, like driving without a seatbelt or smoking, they can usually draw on volumes of data demonstrating that the behavior hurts people. That isn't the case here, and the few remaining supporters of the practice stress this fact.


    David Pruden, the vice president of the National Association for Research & Therapy of Homosexuality, a group whose website proclaims that it "offers hope to those who struggle with unwanted homosexuality," sees the bill as a "solution in search of a problem."


    He maintains that there are people who can, "with the help of a well trained therapist, move through a process where they grow away from homosexual attraction and move towards heterosexual attraction." He gave the example of a child who is molested by an adult of the same sex. "One suggestion would be you're confused, you're not gay. Now this bill is saying that for a therapist to suggest to someone that they're not gay is somehow illegal or would be wrong."


    Mainstream psychological organizations in California were initially opposed to the law for similar reasons, but they withdrew their opposition after working with Sen. Lieu on the language of the bill. "Quite naturally there are many times when an adolescent is exploring their sexual identity and they may want to talk to a therapist about that," said Jo Linder-Crow, the executive director of the California Psychological Association. "We wanted to make sure that legitimate therapy would not be caught up in the definition used in the bill."


    The idea of a gay cure goes back to a time when homosexuality was considered a mental illness and "sodomy" a crime. In the years after World War II, as therapy became a widespread practice in the U.S., the idea of psychiatric treatment for homosexuality was seen as a humane alternative to institutionalization or jail. In the '70s, the American Psychiatric Institution removed homosexuality from its list of mental illnesses, and most psychiatrists and psychologists abandoned the practice. Around the same time, though, Exodus International was formed. Christian groups picked up where mainstream therapists had left off.


    It's hard to say why the "gay cure" practice has received so much attention in just the last few months. "People have had these concerns about it for a long time," said Clinton Anderson, the director of the American Psychological Association's office for LGBT issues. "What may be different is a sense that there's a political will, at least in certain places, to do something more signifiant about it."


    Anderson says there's no way of knowing how widespread the practice is, or how many psychiatrists perform it. The National Association for Research & Therapy of Homosexuality, for its part, does not divulge its membership numbers, thought it does say that its members operate in all 50 states and in a number of other countries.
    Guay, who now runs his own therapeutic practice for people who have been scarred by experiences like his, spent a year with the ex-gay therapist and then got involved with Exodus International, attending several of their conferences. He started dating a woman, but it didn't work out. "I ended that relationship and began a relationship with a man," he said.


    It was only at that point that he had what a therapist might call a breakthrough."'Oh wait,'" he said, recalling his thinking at the time. "'This feels authentic and right.'"
    Thoughts? Should this practice be banned in a therapeutic setting? Does this fall under freedom of religion?
    -Alissa, mom to Tristan (5) and Reid (the baby!)

    Got an opinion? We've got a board! Come join us for some lively debate on the Face Off! Debate Arena board.

  2. #2
    Prolific Poster
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    2,219

    Default

    Whether it causes harm or not, I cannot believe that telling someone they are wrong and I don't support a "cure" for being gay. It's not the flu.

  3. #3
    Mega Poster mom3girls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    3,430

    Default

    If there is no prove that this is harmful than I do not believe that this should be legislated
    Lisa
    Molly, Morgan, Mia and Carson

  4. #4
    Posting Addict
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    7,254

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mom3girls View Post
    If there is no prove that this is harmful than I do not believe that this should be legislated
    With something like this, is there any way to gather evidence other than anecdotal evidence? If the men marry women is that evidence it worked? If a young man commits suicide or suffers from depression is it proof it is harmful?

  5. #5
    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    7,591

    Default

    It absolutely falls under freedom of religion. And the rights of parents to determine what is good for their children.


    Open Letter From Parents of Homosexuals and Former Homosexuals to State Senator Ted Lieu of Torrance, California
    Dear Senator Ted Lieu:
    You claim that “sexual orientation conversion therapy is absolutely illegitimate” and that's why you “want to stop parents from sending their kids to it.” The OC Register quotes you as saying: "The attack on parental rights is exactly the whole point of the bill because we don't want to let parents harm their children…Reparative therapy hurts children, so this bill [legislation SB 1172] allows us to stop parents from hurting their children."

    Sponsoring legislation endorsed by the gay lobby to ensure that children only receive gay-affirming therapy is an act of childhood endangerment and an unconstitutional attempt to deny parental rights everywhere, but especially for parents in California and those in your Torrance district. Your bill will turn California into a nanny state by usurping the civil rights of parents who support their child's right to receive therapy for unwanted same-sex attractions, especially when that child has been sexually molested. This smacks of fascism and ex-gay bashing.

    As parents of gays and ex-gays, we are ashamed of your willingness to take action against parents, children, and the family in order to support gay activists. It is people like you who endanger children, and not their parents, whom you wish to dictate on how they raise their own children. California is not a socialist state and our children do not belong to the government, subject to the ideology of the state over the objections of their parents.

    You endanger youth by denying their right to receive therapeutic help, promoting homosexual behavior to sexually confused youth, and conveniently ignoring the facts about the psychological and physical health risks of sodomy. By your comments, it appears you lack credible knowledge about changeable sexual preference and that you have obtained biased information without consulting the ex-gay community.

    Are you aware that the American Psychological Association admitted at its August 2001 conference that no body of evidence existed to prove that sexual reorientation therapies are harmful? In 2009, the APA stated that research on harm from sexual orientation change efforts is limited, and some of the research that exists suffers from methodological limitations that make broad and definitive conclusions difficult. [Appropriate Therapeutic Responses to Sexual Orientation, p. 67 (APA, 2009)]

    This same APA also stated that affirmative approaches [gay-affirming therapy efforts] have “not been evaluated for safety and efficacy." Id. at 91. Therefore homosexual affirming therapy should be included in your SB 1172 as it has not been proven to be safe.

    Senator Lieu, since you claim your concern is for the safety of children, please read the 2010 CDC AIDS report: 77% of diagnosed HIV infections were attributed to MSM (men who have sex with men). Of those aged 13 to 24 youth, 89% was attributed to MSM. In fact, MSM aged 13 to 24 youth had the greatest increase in diagnosis (44%). Talk about harm to children! Why do you want to prevent youth from receiving counseling for unwanted same-sex attractions when those attractions can kill them?
    http://pfox.org/Parental-Rights-Under-Attack.html
    Mom to Lee, Jake, Brandon, Rocco
    Stepmom to Ryan, Regan, Braden, Baley
    Granddaughters Kylie 10/18/2010 & Aleya 4/22/2013


    I never consider a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosopy, as a cause for withdrawing from a friend. --Thomas Jefferson

  6. #6
    Community Host
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    13,515

    Default

    I agree that parents should be able to do what they feel is best for their children. I can see this easily spinning out of control. Any speaking against homosexuality becoming illegal. Limiting what Pastors can preach on. Limiting what parents can teach in the home. Any time a confused young person goes to therapy they are indoctonated that they are gay even if they are not because it would be illegal to do otherwise.

    That said, once a person is an adult, a person should never be forced into this kind of therapy. (Really a child either, but that is the parents choice) If a Pastor or councler is asked their opinion though, they should be allowed to give it. Or if the person WANTS the therapy it should not be illegal.

    ~Bonita~

  7. #7
    Community Host wlillie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    6,469

    Default

    yep. Covered by freedom of religion. If they can prove that pageants are harmful to kids, they should be able to prove that this kind of cure is harmful.
    mom3girls likes this.

  8. #8
    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    12,517

    Default

    What's to stop a parent then who doesn't give a crap about religion hiding behind that constitutional right simply because they are just bigoted and can't stand the idea of having a gay child? Nothing to do with religion. I am seriously curious about that.

    And, while we all have the right to make decisions that we believe are in our children's best interest, those decision aren't necessarily viewed as being in the child's best interest by social services, courts, and law enforcement. No parent can make a decision for a child that intervenes that child's human rights.

  9. #9
    Community Host Alissa_Sal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Debating Away on the Debate Board!
    Posts
    11,771

    Default

    I'm torn on this one, and not just because of the whole gay issue. Yes, I do believe that part of this is an infringement on freedom of religion, and on parents' rights (despite the fact that I think that a "gay cure" is a crock.) The problem that I have with it is that it appears to have no back up that it is effective, and may or may not be harmful. To take it apart from the gay issue (because I admit that is a subject that is close to my heart and therefore I may be biased about) I think about what if it were something other than homosexuality, like what if someone were treating depression using practices that have not been proven to give any results....should that be illegal? I can think of reasons yes that have nothing to do with religion, mostly that it may hinder the person from getting treatment that is actually beneficial. In the case of gay therapy, if gay therapy truly is ineffective, I can see how that might hinder their progress in simply moving on with their lives and trying to accept themselves with who they are. I don't know if that is a strong enough reason to make it illegal, but I do think that there is at least a case to be made about whether in general any treatments that are not shown to be effective should be legal.
    Jessica80 likes this.
    -Alissa, mom to Tristan (5) and Reid (the baby!)

    Got an opinion? We've got a board! Come join us for some lively debate on the Face Off! Debate Arena board.

  10. #10
    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    7,591

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Claire'sMommy View Post
    What's to stop a parent then who doesn't give a crap about religion hiding behind that constitutional right simply because they are just bigoted and can't stand the idea of having a gay child? Nothing to do with religion. I am seriously curious about that.

    And, while we all have the right to make decisions that we believe are in our children's best interest, those decision aren't necessarily viewed as being in the child's best interest by social services, courts, and law enforcement. No parent can make a decision for a child that intervenes that child's human rights.
    Ok lets say you have a 10 year old son who has been molested by a man. Do you think its ok for it to be illegal for him to talk through with a therapist the feelings he may have as a result of that experience whether he might be gay or if it just what happened to him that is making him feel that way?
    Mom to Lee, Jake, Brandon, Rocco
    Stepmom to Ryan, Regan, Braden, Baley
    Granddaughters Kylie 10/18/2010 & Aleya 4/22/2013


    I never consider a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosopy, as a cause for withdrawing from a friend. --Thomas Jefferson

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 17 1234511 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
v -->

About Us | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Sitemap | Terms & Conditions