Gov. Walker refuses to remove tweet

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Gov. Walker refuses to remove tweet

Should a state governor be able to post a Bible verse on his twitter or facebook feed?

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker believes he can do all things through Christ, but an atheist group charges that he cannot do all things through Christ on his official social media platforms.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation has demanded Walker remove posts from his official Facebook and Twitter feeds that read, ?Philippians 4:13.?

?I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me,? the verse reads.

The atheist outrage over the governor?s beliefs seems almost unbelievable.
?This braggadocio verse coming from a public official is rather disturbing,? FFRF co-presidents Annie Laurie Gaylor and Dan Baker wrote in a letter to the governor. ?To say, ?I can do all things through Christ, who strengthens me,? seems more like a threat, or the utterance of a theocratic dictator, than a duly elected civil servant.?

They accused the governor of misusing his authority to ?promote not just religion over non-religion, but one religion over another in a manner that makes many Wisconsin citizens uncomfortable.?

The atheist outrage over the governor?s beliefs seems almost unbelievable.

I reached out to Walker?s office, and his staff told me the governor has absolutely no plans to remove anything.

?Governor Walker will not remove the post on his social media,? press secretary Laurel Patrick told me. ?The verse was part of a devotional he read that morning, which inspired him, and he chose to share it.?

I can?t seem to recall a tweet generating such histrionics from an atheist group. Normally, they reserve that sort of faux fury for the Baby Jesus or a high school football prayer.

The FFRF said Walker has a responsibility to ?uphold the entirely godless and secular U.S. Constitution.?

?It is improper for a state employee, much less for the chief executive officer of the state, to use the machinery of the State of Wisconsin to promote personal religious views,? they wrote.
The governor?s office clearly disagrees.

?While he frequently uses his social media to engage with Wisconsinites on matters of public policy, he also uses it to give them a sense of who he is,? Patrick said. ?This does just that ? it was a reflection of his thoughts for the day.?

So in that spirit, here?s my thought for the day. Perhaps the next time the FFRF finds itself aggrieved it could post its outrage on Facebook or Twitter. I?m sure there?s an emoticon to express disbelief.

Gov. Scott Walker refuses to take down religious tweet | Fox News

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On his personal FB or Twitter, it would be fine. I agree with FFRF that he should keep his personal religious beliefs off of his official government FB or Twitter accounts. Government is supposed to be religion-neutral.

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So it is ok for the President to say something about God but not for a governor?

THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. Please, everyone have a seat. Giving all praise and honor to God, who brought us here this morning.

Remarks by the President at National Prayer Breakfast | The White House

There are MANY examples of Presidents expressing their faith.

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Holding public office does not strip you of the right to be a religious person. He should be allowed to post whatever he wants on his FB. Now, that might mean that some people might not vote for him again, but he should be able to post whatever he wants on his own personal FB or Twitter.

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I have to say... I don't see an official saying they get strength from their faith as the govt promoting a faith, no matter when/where it's said.

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"GloriaInTX" wrote:

So it is ok for the President to say something about God but not for a governor?

Remarks by the President at National Prayer Breakfast | The White House

There are MANY examples of Presidents expressing their faith.

I would expect God to be mentioned at a Prayer Breakfast.

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"ethanwinfield" wrote:

I would expect God to be mentioned at a Prayer Breakfast.

I would too. Just like I would expect Gov. Walker might want to share something that meant something to him that he read that morning. Elected officials don't stop being people.

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He can share that on his personal feed, just as he can share what he had for breakfast and how his bowel movements are doing on his new diet and cute pics of cats he found on the internet. That stuff doesn't belong on his official government feed because it's inappropriate, just as quoting a bible verse is. Being elected doesn't stop him from being faithful, but he should be more mindful of where he's expressing his faith. That's what his personal feed is for.

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"Spacers" wrote:

He can share that on his personal feed, just as he can share what he had for breakfast and how his bowel movements are doing on his new diet and cute pics of cats he found on the internet. That stuff doesn't belong on his official government feed because it's inappropriate, just as quoting a bible verse is. Being elected doesn't stop him from being faithful, but he should be more mindful of where he's expressing his faith. That's what his personal feed is for.

If a political figure had a religious belief that was shaping his decisions I would want to know that. Not to have him hide it. The same goes for if he was elected specifically because he was religious, it would be foolish to start pretending that he is not religious just because he is in office. The exception would be when he is speaking "As" the Governor. An example would be saying "The State of Virginia would like you to know that God loves you" would not be ok in my opinion.

For example, Pres. Bush saying after 9/11 "God bless us all", yes that is a religious statement, but there is nothing whatsoever wrong with him saying it. Being an elected official does not make you have to all of the sudden be non religious.

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I don't see what the big deal is. It's certainly not "threatening"!

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

If a political figure had a religious belief that was shaping his decisions I would want to know that. Not to have him hide it. The same goes for if he was elected specifically because he was religious, it would be foolish to start pretending that he is not religious just because he is in office. The exception would be when he is speaking "As" the Governor. An example would be saying "The State of Virginia would like you to know that God loves you" would not be ok in my opinion.

For example, Pres. Bush saying after 9/11 "God bless us all", yes that is a religious statement, but there is nothing whatsoever wrong with him saying it. Being an elected official does not make you have to all of the sudden be non religious.

When he's using his government FB or Twitter, he *IS* speaking as the governor. He doesn't have to pretend he's anyone else, he just needs to not use his official capacity to spread religious opinions.

ETA that I don't think "God bless America" is as outrageous as posting a Christian bible quote, and especially one that seems to be saying, "I can do anything because I've got Jesus on my side, and you better believe I mean anything." "God bless America" allows for other religions' versions of whatever or whoever god is, and to those of us who are non-god-following, it's as inoccuous as when people say, "Bless you" when you sneeze. We take it as the good wish that it's intended to be, not as a religious lesson, which it *IS* when you post a bible quote.

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If he was talking about himself then i really don't have a problem with it. I think an elected official should be able to state AS that government official that he is a believer of a religion and gains strength from his faith.

This is stupid. I think this is a case of oversensitivity or trying to make EVERY thing about religion an issue.

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"Spacers" wrote:

When he's using his government FB or Twitter, he *IS* speaking as the governor. He doesn't have to pretend he's anyone else, he just needs to not use his official capacity to spread religious opinions.

He is also speaking as Scott Walker. Elected officials don't lose their freedom of speech on the day they take office. It is not any different than if he gave a speech and stated Philippians 4:13 is one of my favorite verses. He didn't even quote the verse, if you wanted to read it you actually had to go look it up to read it yourself.

“The rights of man come not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God.” ~ John F. Kennedy

“You can’t divorce religious belief and public service. . . I’ve never detected any conflict between God’s will and my political duty. If you violate one, you violate the other.” ~ James Earl Carter, Jr.

“My custom is to read four or five chapters of the Bible every morning immediately after rising. It seems to me the most suitable manner of beginning the day. It is an invaluable and inexhaustible mine of knowledge and virtue.” ~ John Quincy Adams

“I am profitably engaged in reading the Bible. Take all of this Book upon reason that you can, and the balance by faith, and you will live and die a better man.” ~ Abraham Lincoln

“The foundations of our society and our government rest so much on the teachings of the Bible that it would be difficult to support them if faith in these teachings would cease to be practically universal in our country.” ~ Calvin Coolidge

“A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education.” ~ Theodore Roosevelt

“The study of the Bible is a post-graduate course in the richest library of human experience.” ~ Hebert Hoover

“Of the many influences that have shaped the United States into a distinctive nation and people, none may be said to be more fundamental and enduring than the Bible.” ~ Ronald Reagan

Read more: Christian Presidential Quotes: 22 Awesome Sayings