Grading on effort and instead of knowledge
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Thread: Grading on effort and instead of knowledge

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    Posting Addict Dewey's Avatar
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    Default Grading on effort and instead of knowledge

    What are your thoughts on schools adapting new policies that grade students on pure effort and not their knowledge on any given subject.

    Are students more apt to make greater achievements by being graded purely on their effort and not on actually knowledge of the subject? Or is it more likely to set them up future failure?



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    It depends on the subject. You can grade some topics based on effort (e.g., free throws in PE, orthographic drawings in math) but purely on effort - no.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ethanwinfield View Post
    It depends on the subject. You can grade some topics based on effort (e.g., free throws in PE, orthographic drawings in math) but purely on effort - no.
    I'm talking all subjects, in grades K-8th.



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    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
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    I agree with the pp. While I believe that a portion of grade should be attributed to effort and class participation, those are completely subjective, while marks achieved on tests/papers etc. are pretty objective. There needs to be a balance of both.

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    Totally should be a balance of both. Teachers should see that students are making an effort, and give them some credit.

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    I believe a balance is necessary for lower grade levels, but I think it sets students up for failure if they are in high school and still getting credit for effort. I've attended several colleges and held many jobs and none of them cared about effort, only results.

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    Mega Poster elleon17's Avatar
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    I don't agree with it at all.

    How do you judge effort anyhow? Does a teacher really know how much time a student spends outside the classroom studying or practicing?

    I heard a very interesting study that tried to see if all the emphasis on praise and 'everyone wins' trends in parenting helped make more confident young adults and adults. It showed that this has had a negative impact in the actual achievments of the children who were raised in a manner like that.

    Unfortunately there are hard lessons in life and sometimes you are going to be better in somethings than others. Kids need to learn that and know that hard work will get them further. Letting child get an A in math even though they only solved the problems 50% of the time does no good for that child or our society as they become adults and move into higher education.
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    Posting Addict boilermaker's Avatar
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    Gosh, if only my work at my job were evaluated on "effort".

    Or maybe my mortgage company or utility company would appreciate if I "try" to pay my bill, but can't. Will they appreciate my effort?

    Gah! NO! I don't think grading solely on effort anywhere is a good idea.....sure you can report on it, but I want to see real outcomes of learning, not whether a kid "tried". Effort is so subjective-- how do you assess it? I want real objective outcomes of learning.
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    Quote Originally Posted by elleon17 View Post
    I don't agree with it at all.

    How do you judge effort anyhow? Does a teacher really know how much time a student spends outside the classroom studying or practicing?

    I heard a very interesting study that tried to see if all the emphasis on praise and 'everyone wins' trends in parenting helped make more confident young adults and adults. It showed that this has had a negative impact in the actual achievments of the children who were raised in a manner like that.

    Unfortunately there are hard lessons in life and sometimes you are going to be better in somethings than others. Kids need to learn that and know that hard work will get them further. Letting child get an A in math even though they only solved the problems 50% of the time does no good for that child or our society as they become adults and move into higher education.
    But I do know how much effort a student is putting in during class. A student who works their butt of in class should get bumped from a D+ to a C-.

    As a mother, I give praise/credit for effort. DD2 is learning to ride a bike. It's all about effort ride now which will lead to results later on. My band, shop, and home ec. teachers all gave me credit for effort because it's a process. If I was graded in those classes based on results, I would have failed all three of them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by boilermaker View Post
    Gosh, if only my work at my job were evaluated on "effort".

    Or maybe my mortgage company or utility company would appreciate if I "try" to pay my bill, but can't. Will they appreciate my effort?

    Gah! NO! I don't think grading solely on effort anywhere is a good idea.....sure you can report on it, but I want to see real outcomes of learning, not whether a kid "tried". Effort is so subjective-- how do you assess it? I want real objective outcomes of learning.
    Actually the mortgage and other loan companies will accept effort to keep you out of foreclosure/repossesion. As long as you are working with them, giving them some money, they keep working with you.

    Especially in data entry I could see the effort my co-workers put in. Some would try to improve their speed and accuracy, others would slow it way down and work with littel effor.

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