iPads, iPhones etc - Page 4
+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 46
Like Tree16Likes

Thread: iPads, iPhones etc

  1. #31
    Community Host Minx_Kristi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Isle of Man, UK - Anything Topic board Mod
    Posts
    3,731

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KimPossible View Post
    Yeah, its pay as you go. I'm actually surprised at how slowly dd has gone through her minutes on her phone. I thought she would have eaten them up a lot faster than she has.
    I could guarantee that my DD would have no minutes left very quickly, but she's only 5 haha. Hopefully she'll be sensible when she's old enough to have one.

    xx
    Me - Kristi, 30
    DD - Leia, July 5 2008

    I luurrrrrve to lurk!

  2. #32
    Contributor
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Minx_Kristi View Post
    I should have explained the situation a little better. My niece is not a 'normal' 18 yr old (whatever normal is!) and has many learning difficulties. We know she has ADHD but she's never been given a proper diagnosis. She is currently unable to work, mainly because she has no concept of time/money and would not understand that in a working environment that she can't stand around chatting all day or sitting on her phone. She very hard to explain to people that don't know her personally, if that makes sense. This means that anything she owns is purchased by her Mum.
    I think giving kids with ADHD completely unlimited access to any sort of device is just a recipe for disaster. I say this because my own kiddo with ADHD is totally addicted to video games. We are in the process of "weaning" him off of all devices but I wish I had never introduced him to any sort of "fun" electronic. He would probably sit on the computer or XBox all day if we would let him. He has no interest in making friends, all he wants to do is talk about video games, etc. I don't mind him having short periods of time on electronics but with him it's just NEVER enough. My "normal" kids can easily transition to other things and enjoy lots of different activities but I even restrict them because I just don't think it's healthy to be constantly attached to an electronic.

  3. #33
    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    7,684

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KimPossible View Post
    Oh okay.....i agree, I would never get my 8YO her own phone, there is just no need. She doesn't really talk to her friends often enough, nor does she make any plans independently. My response was more to the who privacy thing. I don't go out of my way to give my 8YO privacy for phone conversations but i don't go out of my way to take it away from her either.

    Yeah, its pay as you go. I'm actually surprised at how slowly dd has gone through her minutes on her phone. I thought she would have eaten them up a lot faster than she has.
    I think you will find as they get older they don't actually talk on the phone anymore. They just text. My teenagers almost never actually call their friends.
    Mom to Lee, Jake, Brandon, Rocco
    Stepmom to Ryan, Regan, Braden, Baley
    Granddaughters Kylie 10/18/2010 & Aleya 4/22/2013


    I never consider a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosopy, as a cause for withdrawing from a friend. --Thomas Jefferson

  4. #34
    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    20,289

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GloriaInTX View Post
    I think you will find as they get older they don't actually talk on the phone anymore. They just text. My teenagers almost never actually call their friends.

    yeah i believe that. Emma texts more than she talks on the phone. And its kind of funny actually...if a friend does call, its usually about homework and they always call her home phone, never her cell!

  5. #35
    Posting Addict
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    15,365

    Default

    My three sons are 10, 12, and 15. Matt (12) and Tom (15) both have a cell phone, with Tom's being a smartphone. He does help pay towards the data plan, and since we have a family plan it's not that bad. All three boys do have laptops - Matt and Nathan got theirs for Christmas one year, and use it for school projects and homework assignments. Although now they generally just use our desktop since it's faster. Tom does a lot of advanced computer programs and video editing, so two years ago he just requested Best Buy gift cards for his birthday and Christmas, and saved up some of his own money to get a pretty sweet laptop. Almost all of his classwork is done on the computer or online, so for him it really is a necessity. Matt has an iPod he bought with birthday and Christmas money, and Nathan did the same thing to get an iPad mini. Honestly, they spent almost all of their time playing outside with their friends. We do limit how much they use any of those items, or the PS3, and they seem to be pretty well-rounded kiddos. As long as the electronics aren't ruling their lives, I'm okay with moderation.
    Carolyn - 37
    Wife to Chad - 39
    Mom to Tom - 15
    Matt -11
    Nathan - 10


  6. #36
    Posting Addict
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    23,592

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mommydearest View Post
    As long as the electronics aren't ruling their lives, I'm okay with moderation.
    Exactly. For adults, too.
    Spacers, fuchsiasky and blather like this.
    Laurie, mom to:
    Nathaniel ( 11 ) and Juliet ( 7 )




    Baking Adventures In A Messy Kitchen (blog)

  7. #37
    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    My avatar is the tai chi -- a symbol of the eternal cycle of life
    Posts
    16,556

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KimPossible View Post
    I didn't say they need privacy....i said i don't understand insisting they have every conversation with their friends in front of you. My 8 year old has conversations with her friends and they are the most ridiculous and innocent conversations you could ever think of. Bullying isn't even on her radar, nor has it been at such a young age for any of my kids...nor has it been a problem in either of the schools they go to...until they get older.

    Middle school, entirely different. There's been drama in my daughters class and I've heard at my sons school that bullying can be a problem. And i find it interesting that bullying is used as the reason why we'd eaves drop on our children, yet we'd start letting them have phone conversations away from us at about the time it starts to get bad. I see a big logical disconnect here.

    ETA I also don't understand this concept of 'cant use the phone willy nilly' Do you mean because of the cost? That i could understand, but thats why i think a tracfone is a great way to start. They can learn pretty quickly how fast minutes get used up. I think they learn more by experience then waking up magically one day deciding they will be mindful of their minutes.

    Or do you just mean you don't want them on the phone all the time. I've never restricted my daughter's time on the phone. She gets calls from friends and sometimes they talk for a while, but a lot of the time they don't. I think if on any given day the amount of time she spent on the phone and not doing other things started to get excessive i'd tell her to get off the phone and go do something else. But thats never happened. Its just not one of those things that I would assume would be a problem right off the bat.
    To the first bold: There's not a logical disconnect for me. Tiven was bullied in third grade. Thankfully she told us right away and we put a quick stop to it. Now in fourth grade the same girls are picking on someone else and they're doing it on their phones. My hope is that, if my daughter does become their victim again, I'll be able to find out faster than this other parent did, and I'll also be able to help her stop it, like the time I heard her saying, "I don't like the way you're talking to me," and I told her it was OK to hang up. She said, "I don't want to talk to you when you're mean. You can call me back when you're nice," and she hung up and I gave her a hug. As much as I hate that she's dealing with this, I am glad it's happening now so that she has some tools to use when she's on her phone by herself, kwim? And if I ever hear her being the bully then I'll be able to put an even faster stop to it!

    I don't insist that every conversation has to be "in front of me," only that they not be private. She doesn't get to close the doors and she doesn't get to go outside, and most of the time I actually ignore her, but sometimes yes, I do listen. I listen when I hear her voice getting agitated, or when the other person seems to be doing all the talking, and I especially listen when she's talking to one of the old bullies who are now supposedly friends. I also like being able to give her feedback on some basic good & thoughtful human being life skills. When I heard her tell a friend that she was sad the friend didn't pass an audition, I told her I was proud of her empathy. The friend not passing an audition might not have ever come up in dinner conversation, but I was happy to know that some of the things I've been trying to teach her really are sinking in!

    To the second bold: Yes. I want my daughter to know that there are appropriate times to use a phone, whether for talking or texting or whatever, and there are times to put it away and to be sociable or polite. There's a reason why people use their phones at the dinner table, in the movie theater, and while driving. It's because their parents didn't teach them better.
    The number of U.S. states in which a person can marry the person they love regardless of gender: 30 and counting!

  8. #38
    Posting Addict fuchsiasky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    5,925

    Default

    I see no reason for children to have high priced technology. And teens probably don't need most of it it either. A computer for school is one thing. But an Ipad, an Iphone and an Ipod. No. If they want it that badly than they need to earn it. Otherwise they won't have any respect for it. I am not spending that much money on something so easy to break.

    DSD16 has been through probably 10 phones in the past 4 years. Her phones typically last less than 6 months (and once less than 1 month!) and then she breaks them. And her mother replaces them () She has no sense of responsibility for them because she is too young to own such things! Had she been forced to earn the money to replace them each time then maybe she would stop f-ing dropping them! (Sorry for being ranty, I am obviously still choked.)

    We have decided that when DD is old enough to be able to be out and about on her own we will get her a cheap pay as you go phone for safety purposes. If she wants any other spendy technology she will have to earn it herself. I am not buying her ipads and things just to break them like her sister has. (Although she was given a leappad last christmas and has not dropped it once! Meanwhile her sister has been through 2 phones.)
    Me- Fuchsia
    My Wonderful Partner - Rob
    DD - December 17 2008
    DSD 15
    DSS 18
    Feline Furbabies - Sophie and Indigo

    Little Babe 22/12/05


  9. #39
    Posting Addict fuchsiasky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    5,925

    Default

    I don't have any issue with family electronics. We do have a PS3, a lap top and a cheap tablet. There are rules about how much time is spent and such. We all share and they are owned by the parents.
    Me- Fuchsia
    My Wonderful Partner - Rob
    DD - December 17 2008
    DSD 15
    DSS 18
    Feline Furbabies - Sophie and Indigo

    Little Babe 22/12/05


  10. #40
    Posting Addict fuchsiasky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    5,925

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post

    I pretty much agree with this, but I would add the concern of whether the child is using the technology to withdraw from having to interact with people in the real world or if he's using the technology to stay connected.
    I think this is a key difference to being hidden in a book. We are interacting while on these devices. But not with those around us. It is all tech interaction and that doesn't teach you how to have a conversation with a person in the same room with you. My DSS19 can talk up a storm on the internet, but can't hold a person to person conversation at all. With a book, if you want to talk to someone you have to put the book down!
    Last edited by fuchsiasky; 10-18-2013 at 08:14 PM.
    Me- Fuchsia
    My Wonderful Partner - Rob
    DD - December 17 2008
    DSD 15
    DSS 18
    Feline Furbabies - Sophie and Indigo

    Little Babe 22/12/05


+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
v -->

About Us | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Sitemap | Terms & Conditions