JCrew and gender confusion
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Thread: JCrew and gender confusion

  1. #1
    Posting Addict LiveFreeOrDie's Avatar
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    Default JCrew and gender confusion

    http://moms.today.com/_news/2011/04/...nk-nail-polish

    What do you think? Is JCrew promoting the transgender agenda and confusing little boys?
    Robin
    Mom to Cecilia and Eloisa


    "The trouble with quotes on the Internet is that you can never know if they are genuine." -Abraham Lincoln

  2. #2
    Posting Addict Strange_Cat's Avatar
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    Nah. It's really silly for people to get up in arms over a little boy and nail polish, pink or not. Both of my boys have asked me to put polish on them for fun, because it's cool to try whatever a grownup is doing. My daughter has asked for shaving cream on her face when she watches her daddy shave. It's sweet. It never occurred to me to think of any of that in terms of gender identity.
    Alison

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    Community Host wlillie's Avatar
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    If a little boy gets confused by seeing pink polish on a little boy in a picture, he's got bigger problems that his parents need to be more focused on. I swear I read a study somewhere that says that kids don't really pick pink or blue until they are older, but both sexes love red. I wouldn't paint my kid's toenails pink, but we are more traditional. I still wouldn't get upset with someone else because he asked.

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    Prolific Poster MommyJannah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlillie View Post
    If a little boy gets confused by seeing pink polish on a little boy in a picture, he's got bigger problems that his parents need to be more focused on. I wouldn't paint my kid's toenails pink, but we are more traditional.
    To the first part ... Why? Boys are taught from a young age that pink is a girl color. You proved that in your second sentence. Why would it not be confusing for your son to see another boy getting his toenails painted if you're teaching him that it's only a "girl thing"?

    That said, I have no issue with the article at all. It's like playing dress up, or dolls, or war. If my son put on a tutu and wanted to dance around the house, knock yourself out. Just because we're not assigning children labels and gender identities in the things they enjoy, doesn't mean we're scarring them for life. My daughter knows she's a girl, even if she doesn't enjoy playing with dolls, or barbies, or playing "Princess Peach" or whatever it is they play now. She's not a girl because she has pink nail polish on, she's a girl because she has a vagina.
    Jana& Dave
    McKenna Lyn 6/01
    Amelia Loren 8/03
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    Benjamin Jeffrey 12/10

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    Posting Addict Andy1784's Avatar
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    I make a big effort to never say that anything is for boys or girls to my kids. My son is very into pink right now because he sees many of his sister's new toys that have been gifted to her and of course he wants them. I have no issue with this whatsoever and I wouldn't regardless of age. I do buy my son clothes from the boys department and my daughter clothes from the girls department (mostly) but everything else I try to keep fairly neutral. I don't think my son would be at all confused by this ad.

    If other little boys are brought up more traditionally that is one thing but to get all up in arms over the perceived message of this ad screams homophobe to me.
    -Andy

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    Kaelan April 2009
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    Hailey September 2010 (my VBAC baby)
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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    Only sissy boys would be looking at JCrew anyway

    I have never seen any boy I know even open one so I'm not too worried.
    Mom to Lee, Jake, Brandon, Rocco
    Stepmom to Ryan, Regan, Braden, Baley
    Granddaughters Kylie 10/18/2010 & Aleya 4/22/2013


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    Posting Addict ange84's Avatar
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    Nope I have no issue with DS playing with "girl" toys. At daycare he is the only boy under 12 months old, and one of only a few boys in the whole group (less than 20 kids over the whole week as most are just there a day or two) so guess who the majority of his friends will be. If he saw me painting my nails and wanted his done why not, it's just play and all kids love pretty colours not just girls.
    Wendy




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    We absolutely do say that some things are "girl" things and some are "boy" things. I would not paint my sons nails. He is welcome to wear my daughters dress up girly clothes when they are playing dress up, but I am fine with espousing more traditional gender roles. Like it or not, (literally) over 99% of the men or boys that my son is going to encounter in a day do NOT wear nailpolish, I am fine with explaining to him why he won't either unless he is a grown up and chooses to. I make no effort at all to dress my children gender neutrally (DH and I dress in general cultural norms for our genders). I'm also not homophobic in the least.


    I like crewcuts clothes but admit to hating their catalogue. I don't like seeing kids looking so "modely" at such young ages. Has nothing to do with girly boys or boyish girls, I just find it creepy and sad in general.

  9. #9
    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    It doesn't bother me. I think this ad has the ability to confuse a child based on a parents reaction to it. I don't think it could inherently do so.

    Aodhan used to like to paint his nails. Don't remember if they were ever pink or not. It was just a socially fun thing to him...as almost everyone else in the house was doing it.

    He grew out of that at some point and has been very against having to do with anything he views as a girl thing. I don't think we have purposely reinforced this...i think he's decided it all on his own from observation and from being at school. I've told him on occasion i would love him to wear pink, i think he looks nice in pink. He wants nothing to do with it! Tells me its a girl color. I even point out that his father has a pink oxford, but Aodhan doesn't care.

    But i think it would be silly for me to completely ignore the fact that his societal observations are correct. When he tells me its a 'girl thing' or a 'boy thing', i'm not gong to pretend that its not true. When it comes to pink i acknowledge that more girls clothes are pink than boys but that lots of men do wear pink...and give a couple of personal examples that i know.

    Or same with toys. I don't want him to be afraid to like something that he associates with girls (although he seems to be afraid), but i'm also not going to lie to him either.
    Emma 08/31/01
    Aodhan 07/24/03
    Lillian 03/04/05
    Nathalie 07/01/07
    Cecilia Marie 1/10/10


    Photo By Anne Schmidt Photography

  10. #10
    Prolific Poster MommyJannah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Potter75 View Post
    We absolutely do say that some things are "girl" things and some are "boy" things. I would not paint my sons nails. He is welcome to wear my daughters dress up girly clothes when they are playing dress up, but I am fine with espousing more traditional gender roles.
    I want to say, I don't think it's bad to assign gender roles in the home. I also don't think it makes you homophobic. I just don't understand how her two statements fit together. You can't say "Well my son/daughter would have no idea why that was confusing ... but we would never allow it because that's not something boys do." I don't think either parenting model is "wrong". It would definitely make my children raise an eyebrow if they were raised a particular way, and didn't realize that was not how other little boys were raised.
    Jana& Dave
    McKenna Lyn 6/01
    Amelia Loren 8/03
    Delaney Anne 4/09
    Benjamin Jeffrey 12/10

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