July 12 - Malala Day

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ClairesMommy's picture
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July 12 - Malala Day

If you guys want to read about this brave and inspirational girl here's a link:
Malala says Taliban used bullets to silence her, but failed - World - CBC News

Malala Yousufzai, the Pakistani girl who drew global attention after being shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating girls' education, told the United Nations today she has the strength and courage to continue her campaign despite her ordeal.

The teenager was honoured at the UN headquarters in New York City, where she addressed the UN Youth Assembly with a speech advocating global education.

"Here I stand, just one girl among many. I speak so those without voice can be heard," she told the UN audience, adding everyone has the "right to live in peace and to be treated with dignity."
She recalled the day she was shot on a school bus on Oct. 9, 2012.

"They shot my friends, too. They thought that the bullets would silence us, but they failed, and out of that silence came thousands of voices."

The teen also said she will not be stopped from speaking out in support of human rights.

"The terrorists thought that they would change my aims and stop my ambitions, but nothing changed in my life except this: weakness, fear and hopelessness died. Strength, power and courage was born.

"I'm not against anyone. Neither am I here to speak in terms of personal revenge against the Taliban or any other terrorist group. I'm here to speak for the right of education for every child," she said.

Malala said the Taliban and other extremist groups are motivated by fear of equality and the power of education when they attack students, teachers and schools. The teen appeared at the United Nations alongside former British prime minister Gordon Brown — now the UN special envoy for global education. Brown delivered a petition demanding education for all. Yousufzai has become an international figure as a symbol of resistance to the Taliban’s efforts to deny women's rights. She is also among the nominees for this year's Nobel Peace Prize.

The UN has designated July 12 as Malala Day.

Yousufzai was brought to Britain from Pakistan’s Swat Valley for specialist treatment after she was shot in the head at point-blank range by a gunman last October.
She left a hospital in Birmingham in February following a surgery in which doctors mended parts of her skull with a titanium plate and inserted a cochlear implant to help restore hearing on her left side.

Some 500 youth leaders from 85 countries will be on hand in New York to hear Yousufzai speak. This was her first public speech since the attack. Her speech was delivered amid the release of new UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization) research showing 48.5 million children of primary school age and living in areas of armed conflict are not getting an education.

According to the report by UNESCO and the Save the Children aid agency, the total number of children of primary school age who are not getting an education has fallen from 60 million in 2008 to 57 million in 2011, but during that period the percentage of youth in conflict-affected countries who aren’t at primary school rose from 42 per cent to 50 per cent.
In Syria, about 3,900 schools have either been destroyed, damaged or are occupied for non-educational purposes, the report released on Friday said.

The report says more than a fifth of Syrian schools have been made unusable since the conflict began in March 2011.

How do you think children, and in particular girls, worldwide can be educated? Is it up to the countries or should it be an international responsibility? A responsibility at all? A violation of human rights to not provide education to girls or both boys and girls?

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I don't know, i was watching star trek tng last night and it was a very prime directive focused episode...so my gut at the moment is to say that we should leave it up to the individual countries. At the very least not interfere against their will. But I could probably be persuaded to change my mind.

Obviously i think there is a point where interference in other country's affairs is warranted, but i think its a fine line.

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Education is a human right, and if some countries aren't providing it, or are not providing it to girls, then yes, the international community should get involved in some way. I dislike using religion as an excuse to deny people their human rights. How can these girls better themselves, or know that there *is* something better to strive for, without schooling?

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I agree with Stacey. I consider education a human right.

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I guess i see lots of human rights being violated all over the world and I honestly don't see how the international community can possibly step in an fix all of them..without causing some serious chaos and possible war.

Which is why i think its important to examine where to step in and where not to.

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True enough and I'm not an expert on how to proceed w/o avoiding war. I just feel like it can't be ignored.

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"Jessica80" wrote:

True enough and I'm not an expert on how to proceed w/o avoiding war. I just feel like it can't be ignored.

Yeah i do want to know what the actual solution is if we were to make it an international responsibility. How would we actually accomplish this? By force?

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I understand what you're saying, Kim, and I think education is probably the one most worth fighting for. Freedom from slavery and torture are good, so is freedom from discrimination and the right to a fair public hearing, but all of those are pretty much worthless if people don't know they have those rights, if they don't know that things can be different. And especially girls and women who are already at such a disadvantage in so many places even in the 21st century.

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"KimPossible" wrote:

Yeah i do want to know what the actual solution is if we were to make it an international responsibility. How would we actually accomplish this? By force?

Some friends of mine from East Africa tell this story, and I haven't attempted to corroborate it. It had always been traditional in their culture for girls to not be educated, and for girls to be married at the age of 12. As a result of some international aid 20-something years ago, and the agreements made to receive that aid, girls were encouraged to attend school. At school, the girls learned that they have the right to not be married off at age 12, and the entire town's population of preteen girls refused to get married. It was apparently quite a scandal for a while, and some girls ran away because their parents abused them over the issue, but the end result was that the acceptable age of marriage in their culture rose. So now the children are being raised by mothers who are older, educated, and more mature, and each generation of girls are staying in school longer instead of becoming young baby factories. I don't see that as a bad thing, and it didn't have to involve war.

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"Spacers" wrote:

I understand what you're saying, Kim, and I think education is probably the one most worth fighting for. Freedom from slavery and torture are good, so is freedom from discrimination and the right to a fair public hearing, but all of those are pretty much worthless if people don't know they have those rights, if they don't know that things can be different. And especially girls and women who are already at such a disadvantage in so many places even in the 21st century.

So after we leave Afghanistan if the Taliban takes back over and closes all the schools to girls again do you think we should go back in there for that reason?