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  1. #21
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    I'd rather teach my child to cope with the pressure than to avoid it. Education is necessary in today's world, and 180 days a year really isn't asking too much. Kids have plenty of breaks.....Summer Break, Spring Break, Fall Break, Christmas Break, weekends, evenings, teacher workdays, etc. It is understandable to miss when you are sick or have doctor's appointments. Life happens. But to blow off learning for a trip to the beach or a shopping spree? Not if you are already struggling to keep up....that's irresponsible.

  2. #22
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    I do not believe one or two days a year would harm anything even for a struggling student. Taking time off in excess, I believe would be, but one or two days could be beneficial.

    Even just taking a day to go over all the school work and give one on one attention to figure out what the child does not understand could help a lot. I remember in college having one class that I was really struggling with. DH was my boyfriend at the time. I had a absolute break down upset that I could not understand. He happened to be in the same class. He took my notes and went back to the begining and helped me to understand what I was doing wrong and to get back on track. I finished that semester with an A. It is possible that taking your child out for one day to spend time with them and to figure out why they are struggling in school could be the best possible solution.
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  3. #23
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    I dont think missing one or two days a year is going to make or break a whole year for a child, even one struggling. I may have different outlook because my parent took us out a few times a year to take family days. They would take us places that would provide an awesome learning opportunity. One time we went to the redwoods (pretty close to us) and taught us mapping skills, my brother now makes topographical maps.
    I agree that students have plenty of days off, but unless their parents are teachers it may not work out to do things on those days. My dad was a firefighter and did safety things at a saw mill, he worked a lot. Those days that he pulled us out and used it for a family day were huge for us growing up.
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  4. #24
    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
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    I've read all the posts, and I see everyone's point. I agree with a lot, disagree with a few. Philosophically, I am of the mindset that my life and schedule should be more tailored around my children's school schedules. I won't keep my child out of school because I might have an appointment or some other event that prevents me from getting my kid to school. I'll find another way. Their lives stay as normal as possible in the face of my own personal agenda or whatever. I might feel like a day off would be good for us - play hooky and go someplace fun for the kids for a half a day or whatever. But then I have to remind myself that I am really throwing them for a loop by disrupting their weekly routine. Yeah, it sounds kind of lame, but when I think about it I really, really am messing with them. Also, by introducing the 'let's take a day off life' thing I could be setting myself up for requests for MORE of those days off and having to explain why THAT day was okay but THIS day is not. School is not optional. You go. Every day. Pile on me for being hard-a$$ed about it, but that's the way we roll in this family.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    I do not believe one or two days a year would harm anything even for a struggling student. Taking time off in excess, I believe would be, but one or two days could be beneficial.

    Even just taking a day to go over all the school work and give one on one attention to figure out what the child does not understand could help a lot. I remember in college having one class that I was really struggling with. DH was my boyfriend at the time. I had a absolute break down upset that I could not understand. He happened to be in the same class. He took my notes and went back to the begining and helped me to understand what I was doing wrong and to get back on track. I finished that semester with an A. It is possible that taking your child out for one day to spend time with them and to figure out why they are struggling in school could be the best possible solution.
    If I want to find out what my child is struggling with I'll help them with their homework in the evenings. I'll schedule a conference with the teacher and ask specific questions. I will review all of their classwork and tests to look for weaknesses. I'll observe them in the classroom. If warranted, I'll request additional testing to see if my child has a SLD or some sort of impairment. I will not pull them out of school for the day unless they are ill or there is a death in the family.

  6. #26
    Posting Addict Rivergallery's Avatar
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    I have no problem with it at all, but I look at it this way.. the majority of school work (academics can be done in about 2-4 hours a day.. including highschool.. I did it when I missed over 40 days my freshman year. ) if the child applies themselves. The rest is corralling and training them to sit, and music.pe, art, recess, lunch, not actually doing work... But I don't value the in class time as much as some parents. For TESTS - Kids can do just as well in standardized testing doing 2-4 hours a day of focused work, and the rest lifestyle of learning.. like learning to cook, garden, play, clean, sports, music, art etc etc... That is what the majority of homeschoolers I know do.. And their children all are placing high in testing.. They start about 8 go till lunch and the rest is fun stuff, or older ones are doing projects, or reading, or writing essays etc. We school year round unlike the majority, so do have the availability to take off whenever we want which has been nice with my chronic migraine/ndph.. I do think if you pull your child TOO much from a PS situation you should consider just homeschooling, as you are not helping the teacher, and may end up blaming their teacher if your child gets behind. You as the parent should take responsibility if you choose to do that.
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  7. #27
    Mega Poster indigoV51's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alana*sMommy View Post
    You can't bond in the evenings? Or on the weekends? Not on holidays? Or during the summer? What about Spring Break? Maybe Christmas Break? Seriously, kids get 180 days to learn a ridiculous amount of things and master an insane amount of skills. Missing even two days can be detrimental to the progress of a struggling student.
    We don't eat dinner until 6:30 since that is when my dh gets home. Then it is bedtime at 8. There is really no downtime in the evenings. Weekends are for catching up on chores or other family obligations. The one on one time where only one kid and I can play together is valuable. I think the personal time that we get to spend together is going to help him a lot more emotionally in the long run then missing a day of school that he is probably not even paying attention.
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by indigoV51 View Post
    We don't eat dinner until 6:30 since that is when my dh gets home. Then it is bedtime at 8. There is really no downtime in the evenings. Weekends are for catching up on chores or other family obligations. The one on one time where only one kid and I can play together is valuable. I think the personal time that we get to spend together is going to help him a lot more emotionally in the long run then missing a day of school that he is probably not even paying attention.
    Thank you, I was having trouble articulating that.

    Two days out of the school year is not a big deal unless there has already been a lot of school missed due to illness or something like that. Even my kids' teachers agree with that.
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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by indigoV51 View Post
    We don't eat dinner until 6:30 since that is when my dh gets home. Then it is bedtime at 8. There is really no downtime in the evenings. Weekends are for catching up on chores or other family obligations. The one on one time where only one kid and I can play together is valuable. I think the personal time that we get to spend together is going to help him a lot more emotionally in the long run then missing a day of school that he is probably not even paying attention.
    So the only fun time you get to spend with your children is when you pull them out of school? Perhaps you need to make some changes in your household then. And if your child is probably not paying attention in school.....perhaps even more changes need to be made.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rivergallery View Post
    I have no problem with it at all, but I look at it this way.. the majority of school work (academics can be done in about 2-4 hours a day.. including highschool.. I did it when I missed over 40 days my freshman year. ) if the child applies themselves. The rest is corralling and training them to sit, and music.pe, art, recess, lunch, not actually doing work... But I don't value the in class time as much as some parents. For TESTS - Kids can do just as well in standardized testing doing 2-4 hours a day of focused work, and the rest lifestyle of learning.. like learning to cook, garden, play, clean, sports, music, art etc etc... That is what the majority of homeschoolers I know do.. And their children all are placing high in testing.. They start about 8 go till lunch and the rest is fun stuff, or older ones are doing projects, or reading, or writing essays etc. We school year round unlike the majority, so do have the availability to take off whenever we want which has been nice with my chronic migraine/ndph.. I do think if you pull your child TOO much from a PS situation you should consider just homeschooling, as you are not helping the teacher, and may end up blaming their teacher if your child gets behind. You as the parent should take responsibility if you choose to do that.
    2-4 hours of focused school work... Does that successfully prepare homeschooled students for college coursework when usually homework for EACH class is 2-4 hours (studying and what not)?

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