Limiting who can donate organs?
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Thread: Limiting who can donate organs?

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    Posting Addict RebeccaA'07's Avatar
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    Default Limiting who can donate organs?

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42667886...are/?GT1=43001

    Should inmates be allowed to donate their organs if they are serving on death row, or even in on a life sentence with no chance of parole after they pass?

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    Posting Addict RebeccaA'07's Avatar
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    In this article, it seems as if the inmate is just trying to have a bargaining power. But in general, I think they should be allowed to donate organs after they pass. There are many, many deserving people in the US waiting for organ donations. I doubt they really care who the organ comes from as long as it's healthy and they can live a longer life from the transplant.

    I don't understand where the ethical part of donating is coming from? If the inmate consents to organ donation, it should be like anyone else donating organs. They aren't getting a free pass out of jail for doing so.

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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    I don't think the inmate should be able to profit from it in any way or use it for bargaining, but I see no reason why their organs should not be used if they want to donate them.
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    Community Host wlillie's Avatar
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    It comes down to how close we want to be like China. They can and do let people die so the inmates organs can be used for other people.

    I am a huge supporter of organ donation, but I wouldn't be OK with us taking the organs from people that are in prison unless they died from completely natural causes.

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    Posting Addict RebeccaA'07's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlillie View Post
    It comes down to how close we want to be like China. They can and do let people die so the inmates organs can be used for other people.

    I am a huge supporter of organ donation, but I wouldn't be OK with us taking the organs from people that are in prison unless they died from completely natural causes.
    Of course they shouldn't sit by while an inmate dies off when it could have been prevented. That wasn't the question - but rather can an inmate willingly donate organs after passing or after death from the dealth penalty.

    The guy in the article is on death row, so he might be executed before 'natural causes' can take effect. Should he be allowed to donate organs?

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    I don't think that they should be killed or allowed to die to harvest their organs, but I think that they should be allowed to donate if they want to.
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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlillie View Post
    It comes down to how close we want to be like China. They can and do let people die so the inmates organs can be used for other people.

    I am a huge supporter of organ donation, but I wouldn't be OK with us taking the organs from people that are in prison unless they died from completely natural causes.
    I think there are probably enough safeguards in place from appeals, etc. to make sure they aren't executing people for their organs, plus it would still be voluntary. The article says that they already take organs from inmates that die in prison, just not from anyone that is executed.
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    Community Host wlillie's Avatar
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    No, I don't think he should be able to donate. UNOS is a group of people that literally donate a huge chunk of their lives debating and deciding on things like this. If they aren't confident in the method to get an organ when they know (and meet and love) how many people are waiting than I'd rather it be left alone.

    I guess I'm less trustful of our government than you guys are. I think that China started out with some good ideas that sound like what you think it should be like. But what happens when two inmates get into a fight and one of them is the right bloodtype for the warden's daughter to receive a kidney? I'm sure that situation wouldn't pop up, but similar ones will and I don't trust (no offense) people to be able to do the right thing if they've got a reason to dislike the inmates to begin with (murderer, thief, child molestor). Because if I was a prison guard and a child molestor was about to get killed by another inmate and I knew an innocent, good person (maybe a child) was going to live because of it, I don't think I'd be able to save the inmate. I'm a good person, but I'd let him die.

    I think it gives an incentive for the death penalty or for an earlier than natural death, when there really shouldn't be one.
    eta- And, with high rates of diseases such as HIV and hepatitis C, jail and prison inmates are considered high-risk donors by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and subject to even stricter testing and lifestyle scrutiny than typical organ donors.

    It took 6 months for me to get approved and while I know it doesn't take as long for deceased donors, I bet that if they started allowing this, the next step would be to pre-screen these guys. And the step after that will be to not give them the option. Hell, we won't have the option to not get health insurance soon and we haven't done anything to get stuck in prison.

    eta2-Gloria, I didn't see that. Unless you meant living donation, which is a whole different ballgame IMO.
    Last edited by wlillie; 04-21-2011 at 02:56 PM.

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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlillie View Post
    eta2-Gloria, I didn't see that. Unless you meant living donation, which is a whole different ballgame IMO.
    It doesn't sound like it is common, but it is already allowed. From the above article.

    Ironically, a survey of organ transplant centers nationwide reveals that while taking organs from executed inmates is prohibited, accepting organs from inmates who die of other causes while in custody is permitted, although rarely and under strict circumstances.

    Longo probably has a better chance of donating his liver if he's injured or has a stroke in prison and dies later at a local hospital.

    In such a situation, even the Oregon Department of Corrections couldn’t stand in the way, spokeswoman Jeanine M. Hohn says. “We would not hinder any such donations.”

    Donations after inmates died of injury or illness while in custody have been allowed, though rarely, even in Longo's region, said Mike Seely, executive director of the Pacific Northwest Transplant Bank. "It's happened once or twice in the 20 years I've been here," Seely says.
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    Mega Poster elleon17's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=
    Should inmates be allowed to donate their organs if they are serving on death row, or even in on a life sentence with no chance of parole after they pass?[/QUOTE]

    Yes. Giving someone else a chance at life is more important.

    Actually, I think they shouldn't have the freedom to choose whether their organs are donated or not. (BTW I don't belive in the Death Penalty) Apply this to if someone dies while in jail serving a life without parole sentence. If their organs are viable and healthy, then they should be put on the donor list.
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