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Thread: Marissa Mayer says no more telecommuting for Yahoo employees

  1. #61
    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Potter75 View Post
    If we are willing to accept jobs with zero flexibility, why will employers offer flexibility?
    Because the place that do offer flexibility are likely to have better retention rates than the places that don't and if a company is in a position to offer that they will. In the meanwhile, if people are forced to pick between a more rigid work environment or no work at all, i can't blame someone for picking the rigid work environment. Flexible jobs aren't everywhere. Some people love their work and what they do, some people have to work, and some people don't want a long gap in their careers as they want to be in a comfortable spot in their 50's. I really can't blame someone for taking a less flexible job if there are reasons they want to be working.

    If we are willing to work for free while sick or while we have sick child or a child in the hospital or eat into vacation time (as middle to upper management even?????), why won't CEO's come to expect that of us as women and mothers?
    Because sometimes just choosing not to work is not going to sound like the better option. And really, no job is perfect. Maybe someone who pushes themselves harder than ideal when they are sick likes their job for other reasons.

    If we are all willing to accept jobs which (as some are saying, NOT all on this thread) give us not enough time for our sick kids that is FINE. That is the individuals choice, however.......to blame Marissa for setting this "cause" back several steps when we ourselves are doing nothing to advocate for our own "cause" as it relates to our families....well, its very unfair, IMO.
    Well i don't think Mayer is the sole obstacle in women's ways. I think its a combination of a lot of thigns, but just because there are other factors doesn't mean what she chooses to do has no influence.

    Why hold a stranger to be accountable for our own decisions or our own role in accepting non family friendly positions? Its a double standard. And if we continue to punish successful women by yoking them with the weight of all of our individual bad decisions or failures to negotiate or failures to advocate......well.....are WE responsible for helping or hurting women who threaten to break the glass ceiling?
    Honestly the thought of holding out for the dream flexible ultra family friendly workplace job is kind of unrealistic. Its totally unrealistic. People who have found them should feel blessed and thankful. Sorry, i don't think its within our power, as the employees seeking employment to change the work place. It is not a bad decision to take a job that is 80% right for you and 20% wrong or even 70% 30%. There could be lots of reasons why someone chooses the job they do and maybe having to work when you feel crappy fell into that 30%

    Yahoo is offering child care and flexibility in working from home in all but 200 positions. That is a lot more than some people are saying they get from their companies.
    Its the fact that they had it, took it a way and chose not to bother to figure out how to hold their remote employees accountable for the work they do. And I dread the thought of if they become successful and people start thinking that this was the solution, that there was no alternative way to manage this situation.
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    I think that if I had employees who were taking advantage of working from home and not working, I would also take that right away from them rather than working to make them more accountable. I'd only do it to those involved, but I wouldn't waste my time trying to get them to be better at working from home, I'd just put a stop to it.

    I used to have one person who worked for me who would always ask if they could work from home with some really ridiculous reason. Whenever I gently asked a few questions about why he needed to do that, he'd end up asking for a day off instead, which I would then give to him (if he had it). Obviously he wasn't going to work, he was going to run errands or whatnot, and the slightest challenge, even nicely worded, made him back down immediately. I would not waste my time on making him a better work-from-home worker, that's for sure.
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  3. #63
    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    Also, about the sending kids to school sick thing, while i acted defensively before, i really think that is a pretty typical scenario that most dual income families face, only because sick time at jobs is limited, and getting sick is unpredictable. I know very few dual income families who haven't played the 'should I send them or shouldn't i' game. And really i don't know how one would avoid that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimPossible View Post
    Also, about the sending kids to school sick thing, while i acted defensively before, i really think that is a pretty typical scenario that most dual income families face, only because sick time at jobs is limited, and getting sick is unpredictable. I know very few dual income families who haven't played the 'should I send them or shouldn't i' game. And really i don't know how one would avoid that.
    That's us. They have to be pretty sick for us to keep them home since we both work!

    Now that my son is 9, I can look after him AND work from home, but if my daughter's home I have to just take that as a sick day for myself because she's 5.
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    Yeah, there is probably no agreeing on this one To me its about accountability and blame. But its okay to disagree. I know that I made my experience in the workforce, and then my decision to exit it, and now we make my husbands job work for us in a manner in which I don't complain about or blame anyone else for. And that may not be everyones goal. As stated in another thread, some people like to complain about everything! (And I dont' mean you, I mean people who would take jobs that don't offer what they need, who don't find alternative childcare so they don't have to send a sick child to school, or people who won't advocate for themselves yet expect strangers to do so). I agree that pushing yourself hard is good ~ But then again, I thought you criticized Miller for doing so early on in the thread when you said she succeeded by playing the mans game to get where she did?

    Anyway, I'm probably tapped out on this one.
    Last edited by Potter75; 03-07-2013 at 09:11 AM.

  6. #66
    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by freddieflounder101 View Post
    I think that if I had employees who were taking advantage of working from home and not working, I would also take that right away from them rather than working to make them more accountable. I'd only do it to those involved, but I wouldn't waste my time trying to get them to be better at working from home, I'd just put a stop to it.
    That seems reasonable. Its taking the option away from people who can do it that bothers me. I could see ending the option for those who aren't performing and putting in place steps going forward to actually hold people accountable better. So that if you find you have a problematic remote employee, the situation is remedied, by telling them they can no longer work remotely, or are fired. I mean i can't speak for all the types of jobs that yahoo may have been allowing at home, but a lot of tech jobs? Its pretty friggin easy to tell if someone is getting their work done or not.

    I used to have one person who worked for me who would always ask if they could work from home with some really ridiculous reason. Whenever I gently asked a few questions about why he needed to do that, he'd end up asking for a day off instead, which I would then give to him (if he had it). Obviously he wasn't going to work, he was going to run errands or whatnot, and the slightest challenge, even nicely worded, made him back down immediately. I would not waste my time on making him a better work-from-home worker, that's for sure.
    I get that. I'm not saying turn people who can't work from home into people who can. I'm imagining nipping the problem in the bud and not keeping these unproductive employees around for so long that you get to a point where you just say "no more full time remote employees"

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    Quote Originally Posted by freddieflounder101 View Post
    I think that if I had employees who were taking advantage of working from home and not working, I would also take that right away from them rather than working to make them more accountable. I'd only do it to those involved, but I wouldn't waste my time trying to get them to be better at working from home, I'd just put a stop to it.

    I used to have one person who worked for me who would always ask if they could work from home with some really ridiculous reason. Whenever I gently asked a few questions about why he needed to do that, he'd end up asking for a day off instead, which I would then give to him (if he had it). Obviously he wasn't going to work, he was going to run errands or whatnot, and the slightest challenge, even nicely worded, made him back down immediately. I would not waste my time on making him a better work-from-home worker, that's for sure.

    So would I." Oh! Starting up companies while I pay you to work for me AND completely not doing your job? so cute! See ya!!!!"

    Everyone is so quick to blame their manager....managers aren't babysitters and grown adults can take some responsibility for paying the price for a craptastic work ethic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Potter75 View Post
    So would I." Oh! Starting up companies while I pay you to work for me AND completely not doing your job? so cute! See ya!!!!"

    Everyone is so quick to blame their manager....managers aren't babysitters and grown adults can take some responsibility for paying the price for a craptastic work ethic.
    Yep. That guy ended up getting fired anyway, he was a total slacker.
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  9. #69
    Prolific Poster ftmom's Avatar
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    Can someone please tell me what these 'alternative childcare arrangements' that will take your kids when you are sick are. People keep saying that you should make 'alternative arrangements' so you can work, and not send a sick child to school, but I have never heard of such a thing. No daycare I have ever heard of would take them, and I would never expect a friend (especially one with kids) to take care of my sick child, and I would honestly never offer to take someones sick child myself, so what does that leave? I guess family if you are lucky enough to live near family members who dont work, but what about the rest of us?
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    Quote Originally Posted by ftmom View Post
    Can someone please tell me what these 'alternative childcare arrangements' that will take your kids when you are sick are. People keep saying that you should make 'alternative arrangements' so you can work, and not send a sick child to school, but I have never heard of such a thing. No daycare I have ever heard of would take them, and I would never expect a friend (especially one with kids) to take care of my sick child, and I would honestly never offer to take someones sick child myself, so what does that leave? I guess family if you are lucky enough to live near family members who dont work, but what about the rest of us?
    I use babysitters. You think working parents are the only ones who deal with sick kids or sick (or hospitalized) parents? we had to hire full time "alternative childcare" when i broke my hip (our main sitter, who we use for overnights was still teaching school the first teo weeeks) Kindov insulting.. I have no fewer than 6 babysitters who have been background checked and who watch my kids. If one is sick and the others have something I hire a sitter. When I was on crutches for 8 weeks my girlfriends set up a meal thing online and fed my entire family dinner for 8 weeks. Community and a bevy of help is important whether you work or not. If people don't have help available I truly feel terrible for them if sh!t should ever hit the fan someday.

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