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  1. #61
    Prolific Poster Danifo's Avatar
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    What are the ages of teenagers in that map? Bible belt areas also have a higher percentage of people who marry young at 18 or 19.

    I like the idea that they need to talk to someone, even if it is just the pharmacist to talk about safe sex but I can see how in real life that might not work.
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  2. #62
    Mega Poster mom3girls's Avatar
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    Exactly, even if it is just a pharmacist! I just cannot imagine a 13 year old girl being totally ready to not only have sex, but have the ability to go to a store and buy this drug.
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  3. #63
    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    My girls are not old enough for me to have considered if I would allow them to be on birth control as a teenager. I am not going to go back and look, but I do not believe I have ever said I would not. I am leaning to think that if I knew for sure they were having sex, and there was nothing I could do to stop it, then I would take them to go on BC. As I said, we are not there yet as my oldest is 7. I would not take my child to get an abortion. I would be there for them and support them in whatever way possible if they became pregnant even if it meant raising the child myself.
    I hope that you will know FOR SURE your child is having sex because your child feels that they can tell you they're having sex, instead of you guessing. I would tend to think that parents who haven't had that conversation with their child are the parents who do not want their child to have unrestricted access to the morning after pill.

  4. #64
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    I know there are many people on this thread who are anti sex education in schools but you are cool (in general) with a lecture from a pharmacist? I definitely don't think that would work and I do believe most pharmacists would need to counsel on anything dispensed at the pharmacy. Perhaps, they shouldn't have the option to decline counseling...I would be okay with a requirement that the pharmacist has to discuss any risks and also that it is not preventing std's and have that quick counseling if under 18?

    For the record I was fairly young when I first started having sex. I was prepared and protected and in a loving relationship. I don't think it is for everyone and I certainly wouldn't want my daughters to make the same decision. Because I KNEW my options I felt as safe as I could be. I never needed anything like this at that time but I would have been absolutely able to make the decision to go purchase it and take it safely. If I could take bcp safely why couldn't I be expected to do this?
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  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClairesMommy View Post
    I hope that you will know FOR SURE your child is having sex because your child feels that they can tell you they're having sex, instead of you guessing. I would tend to think that parents who haven't had that conversation with their child are the parents who do not want their child to have unrestricted access to the morning after pill.
    I had a fairly open relationship with my mom on sex and sex ed and I still didn't tell her. I felt like that was my private life...she didn't tell me her life and I didn't tell her mine lol. I ended up telling her eventually but not at first.
    Mom to Elizabeth (5) and Corinne (3)

  6. #66
    Mega Poster mom3girls's Avatar
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    Totally open and honest relationship with my mom, told her we were talking about sex, she told me to make a doctors appt and go. I didnt tell her when we started having sex though. I am not sure she would have been okay with that much information. (and I was 1
    Lisa
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  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Danifo View Post
    What are the ages of teenagers in that map? Bible belt areas also have a higher percentage of people who marry young at 18 or 19.

    I like the idea that they need to talk to someone, even if it is just the pharmacist to talk about safe sex but I can see how in real life that might not work.
    New data shows that U.S. divorce rates are higher in Southern states such as Alabama, Kentucky, and Texas. This information is important to church leaders since these states are located in what is traditionally known as the "Bible Belt." However, these same leaders squabble over whether or not Christians are truly part of America's growing divorce problem.

    Data from the U.S. Census shows the divorce rate among both men and women in the South hovers over the national average. In the South, the divorce rate is 10.2 divorces per 1,000 men aged 15 or older and 11.1 divorces per 1,000 women.
    The national divorce rate rests at 9.2 divorces per 1,000 men and 9.7 divorces per 1,000 women. The Northeast region boasts the lowest divorce rate at 7.2 divorces per 1,000 men and 7.5 per women. But the region also has the lowest number of marriage as well.
    Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Georgia, Tennessee, and Oklahoma - states traditionally known for their conservatism - are experiencing divorce rates between 11 and 13.5 divorces per 1,000 for both men and women.
    Arizona has the highest rate of divorce in the nation among women, 16.2 divorces per 1,000 women. Arkansas holds the highest divorce rate in the nation among men, 13.5 per 1,000.
    Dwayne Hastings, vice president of communications for the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethic and Religious Liberty Commission, said of the data, "Couples are entering into the marriage relationship without an idea, a real solid idea of what they are getting into," he described.

    They may be getting married, but if so they have a high rate of divorce on those marriages.

    NOw, call me crazy, but what exactly do you guys want a pharmacist want asking a 1 2 year old at the counter without your permission? Could you detail what that interaction would look like?

    "Who did you have sex with little girl? Did it feel good? tell me more about it before I give you the pill? Show me what you did?"Why do you trust the pharmacist more than you trust your daughter??

    Yeah, NOT.
    Last edited by Potter75; 04-06-2013 at 06:37 AM.
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  8. #68
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    I was completely baffled by the pharmacist reference in that first post but now I get it. You want a 12-year-old girl who's pregnant to be forced to discuss it with a pharmacist at the drugstore? Where is this conversation taking place? What is the content of it?
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  9. #69
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    Yeah eww to that. I hope you didn't take my post to mean that. I meant "counseling" like any other drug dispense. Like, I picked up amoxicillin and I could be counseled on it. I was thinking about how to take it appropriately and advising it helps to prevent pregnancy only not STD's. NOT on sex ed. I am hoping I was clear on it.
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  10. #70
    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    You're absolutely correct! The U.S. states whose residents have the most conservative religious beliefs on average tend to have the highest rates of teenagers giving birth. The relationship could be due to the fact that communities with such religious beliefs (a literal interpretation of the Bible, for instance) may frown upon contraception, researchers say. If that same culture isn't successfully discouraging teen sex, pregnancy rates rise. One of the study authors said, "We conjecture that religious communities in the U.S. are more successful in discouraging the use of contraception among their teenagers than they are in discouraging sexual intercourse itself." Teenagers in other states that don't have the strong religious culture not only tend to use contraception, even the first time, they also tend to use the more reliable forms of birth control, and they have better access to abortion clinics so they can actually have an abortion if they don't want to have a kid when they're still a kid. See those lovely shades of green? Those are the highest rates of teen births, right there in the Bible Belt.

    Strange how these maps are so similar. It doesn't mean less are getting pregnant, it just means more are having abortions.

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