NAD - boosting milk supply

14 posts / 0 new
Last post
Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 3 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301
NAD - boosting milk supply

Have a friend who was told milk supply was low.. anyone have this trouble.. she is already supplementing.. wish I had known earlier.. anyway.. any suggestions?

Meant to title it BOOSTING... Milk Supply lol

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 days ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

"Rivergallery" wrote:

Have a friend who was told milk supply was low.. anyone have this trouble.. she is already supplementing.. wish I had known earlier.. anyway.. any suggestions?

There are some different teas that can help with producing more milk. When Caitlyn was a baby I had a bad infection either the antibiotics or the infection really killed my supply. I had some help with the tea but I do not remember what it was called.

Rivergallery's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 year 3 months ago
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

Did it help?

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 days ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

It did help some, but my milk supply never did return to what it was before.

Offline
Last seen: 2 months 4 days ago
Joined: 08/17/04
Posts: 2256

I took fenugreek and ate a lot of oatmeal when I had a supply issue. It boosted it back quickly.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 days ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

"Jessica80" wrote:

I took fenugreek and ate a lot of oatmeal when I had a supply issue. It boosted it back quickly.

Fenugreek. That is what I was trying to remember. You can get it in drop form that you can just add to your food or you can get it in tea form. Stores like Earth Fair sell it.

MissyJ's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 weeks 3 days ago
Joined: 01/31/02
Posts: 3289

We have a lot of information available on breastfeeding that you can share with your friend -- including on increasing milk supply.

Here are some articles which should help:

Herbal Remedies for Milk Supply

Boosting Low Breast Milk Supply

From our years with lactation consultants, contributing experts, and personal stories/articles -- we have compiled tons of info. She can use a search onsite for whatever topic she wishes or she can browse through all the breastfeeding resources we have available. If there is a specific question she needs to have answered I do have LC's that I can reach out to.

Last comment: Speaking from personal experience, despite supplementing she can return to exclusively breastfeeding if that is what she would like.

HTH!
~Missy

Spacers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 months 1 week ago
Joined: 12/29/03
Posts: 4104

Why does she believe she has a low supply? Is her baby not growing properly? Or is it because she is pumping & not getting a lot? Is she allowing baby full access to the breast at all times? It's amazing how many women nurse for just 5 or 10 minutes and then pull baby off, and then wonder why baby doesn't grow. And it's amazing how many women think they have a "low supply" because they only get a few ounces when they pump; they don't know that baby is a much better sucker than a pump!

So my first advice would be to get a baby scale (you can usually rent them from places that sell breastfeeding supplies, and sometimes the ped's office will loan one out if they suspect baby isnt' growing) and weigh baby before & after a few feeds each day to see exactly how much baby is taking in. There might not be a problem anywhere except in her imagination!

My second advice, if there is a problem or even if she just has anxiety about the situation, would be to stop supplementing, stop pumping, and get into bed naked with baby for three days and stay there and nurse as much as possible and cuddle baby all the rest of the time. This helps reset her body's physiological patterns, it kind of tricks her body & mind back into newborn milk production. It's a fantastic thing & I've seen it work! Fenugreek and oatmeal are very good resources, and so is Blessed Thistle; together with the Fenugreek they work better than either of them solo. Also avoid anything in the mint family, and the herbs parsley, oregano, lemon balm, sage, and thyme as much as possible as these herbs suppress millk production.

If she does need to continue supplementing, she should be using a supplementation system that delivers the formula to baby while baby is nursing; this not only gets the food to baby in the most natural way possible, it can actually stimulate milk production because the baby is suckling the nipple! If she needs to continue supplementing long term, she can do so while still breastfeeding as much as possible. Always offer the breast first, and use the bottle to top baby off if needed.

MissyJ's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 weeks 3 days ago
Joined: 01/31/02
Posts: 3289

Oh gosh -- excellent points! if I judged my nursing supply based upon my pumped results I would have quit! (I self labeled myself a pumping failure and I tried everything from manual to double electric hospital grade! For whatever reason I just couldn't! LOL) ALL my kids though successfully nursed for well over a year and definitely thrived.

One other suggestion that helped me was that I found that I nursed almost completely on one breast for a feeding vs. switching midstream. In doing so my little ones were able to empty the breast better and be ensured to get the hindmilk.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 days ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

I know this is not a debate, but I did want to point out another POV. While most often babies that are breast fed are completely fine, it can happen that someone is not producing enough milk. My SIL breastfed my niece. Because it was so taught that if you are breast feeding often enough the baby is fine, my niece almost died of mal nutrition. It also happened with my daughter that I was breastfeeding and I thought everything was fine until I went in for her next checkup. She went from the 75% to the 25% in just a few months. The baby scale is a great way to know if the baby is actually gaining weight or not. Most important is your mommy gut. If you think the baby is not getting enough to eat, it is possible that she is not. Take her in to get weighed.

Spacers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 months 1 week ago
Joined: 12/29/03
Posts: 4104

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I know this is not a debate, but I did want to point out another POV. While most often babies that are breast fed are completely fine, it can happen that someone is not producing enough milk. My SIL breastfed my niece. Because it was so taught that if you are breast feeding often enough the baby is fine, my niece almost died of mal nutrition. It also happened with my daughter that I was breastfeeding and I thought everything was fine until I went in for her next checkup. She went from the 75% to the 25% in just a few months. The baby scale is a great way to know if the baby is actually gaining weight or not. Most important is your mommy gut. If you think the baby is not getting enough to eat, it is possible that she is not. Take her in to get weighed.

Yep, that's why I always say to get a baby scale at home to see just how much baby is getting on a regular basis. But in the absence of prior breast surgery or hormonal problems, the majority of supposed supply problems are usually mothers simply not making sure baby gets enough, gets all the hind milk, has enough time to get as much as they want, etc. I really wish that good breastfeeding classes were mandatory during pregnancy. I've counseled so many women who were told to nurse 10 minutes on each side, or even 5 minutes on each side. That is just ridiculous "advice" and it sets them up for failure.

That said, Tiven went from 75% in weight to 25% but she also went from 25% in height to 75% so the ped wasn't worried about it one bit. And then the next visit she'd gone back to 75% in height and 25% in weight. It's a pattern she continues to this day.

Another common problem I forgot to mention earlier is baby's latch. A baby with a poor latch isn't going to get enough milk, period. A poor latch is usually pretty painful for mom, so it doesn't usually go long before being diagnosed. But there might be cases with a very small baby without good muscle tone where baby has a poor latch but not enough suck for mom to notice.

MissyJ's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 weeks 3 days ago
Joined: 01/31/02
Posts: 3289

Bonita,

I don't think any of us dispute that there are very real issues which definitely could result in a failure to thrive. At times it is mom's milk supply. Other times it may be the latch or physical problems with mom or babe. Stacey's first bit of advice was to weigh the baby (in the buff I'd add. Amazing how much those loaded diapers even on a newborn could weigh! LOL)

To the OP - while you likely know these already, Bonita's point is important also to pass these along to your friend. She should not ignore warning signs such as low urine/stool output, lethargy, weak crying, dry mouth and/or eyes. The fontanel (baby's soft spot) should not become sunken or depressed. Baby's skin should retain elasticity and no fevers.

If at anytime she is sincerely concerned taking the baby in for a quick check can give her peace of mind and avoid having the baby be at risk.

Something positive: Many insurance companies may now cover a lactaction consultant for one on one attention. If that isn't an option, have her connect with a local breastfeeding group for local resources and support.

HTH!
~Missy

AlyssaEimers's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 4 days ago
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6803

I did not mean to sound negative. I just have seen too many people advise if they are breastfeeding they are fine when that is not always the case.

tink9702's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 4 months ago
Joined: 09/28/08
Posts: 2977

*lurker*

Also consider tongue ties with the baby. They can cause major issues with baby's latch and BFing in general.