New Orleans public housing
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  1. #1
    Posting Addict culturedmom's Avatar
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    Default New Orleans public housing

    The 6th anniversary of Katrina is coming up this month. I rewatched the second doc by Spike Lee about Katrina called "If G-s is Willing and the Creek Don't Rise" and one of the saddest parts for me is the debate on the tearing down of the projects and building of mixed-income housing.

    There are two sides it seems to this debate. One that said that the gov't was just waiting for the opportunity to tear them down and the forced evacuation of the people because of Katrina was just the right opportunity to do what they had always wanted to do but couldn't...get the Black poor out and build housing that would bring in more desirable people.

    The other side says that the projects were so bad they couldn't in good conscious let anyone move back in.

    This is the aricle from 2007 when it all happened. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/14/us...14orleans.html

    Here is a blog someone sent me not too long ago.
    http://labucketbrigade.wordpress.com...ower-9th-ward/

    So I guess the debate is, who do you think is right?

  2. #2
    Community Host wlillie's Avatar
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    I drove by an area like that not a month ago. They aren't safe IMO. I don't think fixing them is the answer as they weren't worth anything to begin with. I really don't understand why people would fight to move back into them. I'm fiscally conservative and would rather Section 8 pay most of the rent for low-income families to live in apartments than for the government to try to make those homes livable again. It just doesn't make sense financially.

    They are nasty, unsafe, too hard to take care of and lead to high-crime areas all grouped in one spot which means the people who are honest hard-working citizens aren't going to move there to help with paying taxes in the area. New Orleans public housing was a place where hopes and dreams went to die. Why revive it?

    Couldn't read the blog, but found this article
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...ryId=129448906
    Last edited by wlillie; 08-09-2011 at 11:06 AM.

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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    I think it is a good thing. Sometimes people get too complacent and need a little kick in the pants to get out of their comfort zone. Whether they like it or not, I think it is good for these people to be in a more diverse community. It may take some time to get them integrated, but I think it is good for the long run for these areas to disappear.

    Despite the demolition of the city’s four largest public housing developments, New Orleans has more subsidized housing for its poorest residents now than it had five years ago. But even after spending billions to tear down the old projects and issue vouchers to encourage low-income renters to settle in better neighborhoods, the Housing Authority of New Orleans continues to see these clients concentrated in the city’s poorest areas.

    As of September, 1,841 occupied public housing units and 14,000 Housing Choice Vouchers were in use in the city, according to HANO. By the end of the year, another 3,000 vouchers will be made available – bringing the number of vouchers in the city to an all-time high – and 2,000 public housing units now under construction should be finished. That will be a total of 20,841 subsidized units.

    Before Hurricane Katrina, HANO had 5,100 occupied housing-development units and 8,500 vouchers, for a total of 13,600 units.

    The vouchers are meant not only to replace public housing units that were torn down after the storm, but to achieve federal housing goals of deconcentrating poor people, and integrating them into the rest of society, socioeconomically and racially.
    Such as this woman... who wants to move back to public housing because she has to mow her grass and pay utilities? What a reason to move back to the ghetto.

    Patricia Claiborne grew up in the St. Bernard public housing development and left for a decade while she was married. However, she returned to public housing – first the Desire development and then Lafitte – after a divorce made it impossible for her to support herself and her three children.

    Now she lives across the street from the redeveloped St. Bernard, now called Columbia Parc, in a tidy, carpeted two-bedroom house she rents with a voucher. On a recent Monday, she shrieked at the sight of a snake writhing through the tall grass covering an abandoned lot next door. While her landlord rebuilt after Katrina, not all property owners have come back or renovated. That relative desolation combined with such headaches as utility payments and lawn maintenance, which she didn’t have to deal with in public housing, are among her reasons for considering a return to public housing.

    “I like the house,“ she said. “But the grass and all that, I never worried about grass cutting before. Private house. Private drive. Everything private. I like it here, but I may just go back.”

    Glancing over at a muted television in the middle of her unadorned living room, she said that she thinks she’d rather be in Lafitte, even if it means living in a smaller apartment without relative luxuries, such as a washer and dryer, that she enjoys now.

    “I’d rather be in the middle of everything,” she explained.
    http://thelensnola.org/2010/11/11/ha...ers-locations/
    Last edited by GloriaInTX; 08-09-2011 at 11:42 AM.
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    Dude, if my husband left me and I was living in my home alone I sure would not want to cut the grass!We have a lot of grass. Were I a single Mom I would have to hire someone to cut my grass or hire a babysitter to watch my kids while I cut my grass. That would suck! I can't blame others for wanting the same. What if this woman was disabled? What if she was old? What if if was just dang old hot?

    That said, I have no answer on this one. The whole thing makes me sick. I am so, so sorry for those folks who are being "redistributed" into areas that they don't know. At the same time, I don't understand the desire to live in an uninhabitable place. Those "areas" won't disappear, and I disagree that this argument comes down to complacency.

    I just read "Zeitoun", which I would recommend to everyone. It sucked me in, big time. Great read.

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    Posting Addict culturedmom's Avatar
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    OMG Melis, that book was so incredible. ITA on the recommendation.

    As to the post, I will have to come back to this one. Y'all know how I get with these race issues so I'll have a few Tequila shots, mellow out, and come back.

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    Posting Addict RebeccaA'07's Avatar
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    If the community was uninhabitable and it was more harmful for those people to move back into their housing, then I can see why the government would decide to not fix the houses back up or rebuild in part of a city that isn't good.

    And I agree...If I were a single mother or older person or disabled, I wouldn't want to mow the grass either. If my Husband didn't mow the grass, I would hire someone to do it. But I wouldn't choose a lower-grade house with less space/amenities just because the grass had to be mowed.

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    Community Host wlillie's Avatar
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