Obamacare is almost here - Page 2
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 45 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 445
Like Tree85Likes

Thread: Obamacare is almost here

  1. #11
    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    7,706

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jessica80 View Post
    But what are we comparing here? I haven't had a chance to really review offerings in TN. Now, with all the additional coverage you don't have limits on women's health care, or overall dollar maximums (such as limit for lifetime 50,000 or 100,000 (which is 1 or 2 inpatient stays respectively). We are probably not comparing apples to oranges here. More like apples to a steak dinner.
    This is to keep the same level of coverage that they already have. So under Obamacare they will get LESS coverage for more money if they have to move to a cheaper plan. But that's the point too. Why should I have to buy a steak dinner if all I want is an apple? I don't plan to have any more babies and my tubes are tied. Why do I HAVE to buy a premium with contraceptive and maternity coverage and pay extra for it?

    Blue Cross Blue Shield Nebraska informed Blome his health care plan will terminate at year?s end, and if he wants to move to a similar plan his new premium will go up 65 percent, costing him nearly $4,000 more per year.

    He distinctly remembers President Obama looking into TV cameras and assuring Americans ?If you like your health care plan, you?ll be able to keep you health care plan. Period.? Blome?s letter says otherwise.

    ?Stupid me, I took the president literally,? Blome said.

    Many other Nebraskans are getting similar letters. Blue Cross Blue Shield is notifying about 46,000 policyholders who buy their own insurance coverage of changes to their plans as a result of Obamacare. Most of them are learning that if they want to stick with a similar plan, their rates will go up.
    Gilsdorf said the letters going out to Blue Cross customers show people the price to move to a comparable plan, but they have the option of choosing other, cheaper plans.

    But in Blome?s case, the cheapest option offered by Blue Cross is still 55 percent more expensive than his current premium. He will check out the rates on the federal exchanges when they begin operating next week, but suspects the prices won?t be much different.
    Last edited by GloriaInTX; 09-27-2013 at 12:02 PM.
    Mom to Lee, Jake, Brandon, Rocco
    Stepmom to Ryan, Regan, Braden, Baley
    Granddaughters Kylie 10/18/2010 & Aleya 4/22/2013


    I never consider a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosopy, as a cause for withdrawing from a friend. --Thomas Jefferson

  2. #12
    Community Host
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    13,764

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jessica80 View Post
    But what are we comparing here? I haven't had a chance to really review offerings in TN. Now, with all the additional coverage you don't have limits on women's health care, or overall dollar maximums (such as limit for lifetime 50,000 or 100,000 (which is 1 or 2 inpatient stays respectively). We are probably not comparing apples to oranges here. More like apples to a steak dinner.
    I only know how it has played out in our lives. For the last 7 years that DH has worked for his county there have been 7 or 8 insurance plans that each employee looked through and chose which one best met the needs of their family. This year there will only be one option that all employees have to take. They have said this is because none of the other plans meet the new guidelines. (So much for keeping your current coverage if you want it)

    7 years ago when DH was hired our insurance for our family was $200/month with a $250 deductible $500 out of pocket. Last year our insurance was about $450/ month with a $2000/per person deductible and a $4,000 max out of pocket (per person, not per family). I do not know what this years numbers will be. I am sure there are plenty of people out there that is new plan is going to help, but I do not personally know any of them.

    ~Bonita~

  3. #13
    Prolific Poster
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    2,224

    Default

    that's a pretty common plan type to have even pre NHCR. Deductible plans are on the rise and have been for over 10+ years because employers cannot afford to provide insurance w/o it (and again well before Obama was in office).

    Gloria, you can't always cherry pick your plan. It needs to be in a pool in order for insurance to work properly. If you don't pool in then there isn't enough money to cover claims.
    Spacers and ClairesMommy like this.
    Mom to Elizabeth (6) and Corinne (4)

  4. #14
    Community Host
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    13,764

    Default

    I just was talking to DH. I misunderstood. There will not longer be offered any plan at his work like we had before. He will only be able to choose one of the exchanges. The Gold, Bronze, or Silver. (He works in GA, not TN)

    ~Bonita~

  5. #15
    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    7,706

    Default

    This says it in a nutshell. You are forced to pay more to take coverage you don't need or want, and in return have to pay a higher deductible to cover the things you DO need.

    Mom to Lee, Jake, Brandon, Rocco
    Stepmom to Ryan, Regan, Braden, Baley
    Granddaughters Kylie 10/18/2010 & Aleya 4/22/2013


    I never consider a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosopy, as a cause for withdrawing from a friend. --Thomas Jefferson

  6. #16
    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    7,706

    Default

    You know it's bad when even the unions are jumping ship.

    Probably the most telling of recent events about how catastrophic Obamacare is comes from three of the nation's largest labor union leaders who, after pushing hard for the passage of Obamacare, are now demanding either exemptions from it or its repeal.

    In a joint letter to Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi, the union leaders rightly highlight the devastating effects of Obamacare, including:

    “Perverse incentives are causing nightmare scenarios. First, the law creates an incentive for employers to keep employees’ work hours below 30 hours a week. Numerous employers have begun to cut workers’ hours to avoid this obligation, and many of them are doing so openly. The impact is two-fold: fewer hours means less pay while also losing our current health benefits.”

    They forgot to mention the companies that aren't hiring or who are cutting back on employees to stay under the magic number of 50.

    "…workers will be 'relegated to second-class status' despite being 'taxed to pay for those subsidies,' a result that will 'make non-profit plans like ours unsustainable' and 'destroy the very health and wellbeing of our members along with millions of other hardworking Americans.'” (Forbes summation on the letter emphasizing the negative impact to the generous Taft-Hartley plans their members currently enjoy.)

    The subsidies are nothing more than "crossing checks in the mail" anyway. You pay higher insurance premiums and taxes to pay for your own subsidy. Typical big government move to promise free money, that isn't free at all, just to sell a program and make people dependent upon government.

    “On behalf of the millions of working men and women we represent and the families they support, we can no longer stand silent in the face of elements of the Affordable Care Act that will destroy the very health and wellbeing of our members along with millions of other hardworking Americans.”

    On one hand, you'd like to say to the union leaders, "you made this bed, now lay in it," but they are right, Obamacare will "destroy the very health and wellbeing" of hundreds of millions of Americans.
    Obamacare hurting Americans - York News-Times: Editorial
    Mom to Lee, Jake, Brandon, Rocco
    Stepmom to Ryan, Regan, Braden, Baley
    Granddaughters Kylie 10/18/2010 & Aleya 4/22/2013


    I never consider a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosopy, as a cause for withdrawing from a friend. --Thomas Jefferson

  7. #17
    Community Host
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    13,764

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alissa_Sal View Post
    I just read somewhere that the insurance premiums on the TN exchanges are some of the lowest prices in the country.
    You can't base what something costs in TN or GA on what things cost elsewhere. Yes, the cost of living is much lower here, but so are the wedges. Our house payment is low and so are many of our other expenses, but so is the pay. DH looked into a job in DC recently. It paid more than 3x what he makes now. It probably also costs 3x as much to live in DC though.

    It is possible that is why the changes are such a big news story here. It will mean MAJOR changes for our area. It might not effect other areas as much.

    ~Bonita~

  8. #18
    Posting Addict Alissa_Sal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Debating Away on the Debate Board!
    Posts
    11,770

    Default

    Gloria, from your article:

    Omaha Sen. Jeremy Nordquist said part of the problem is Nebraska didn’t take full advantage of Obamacare by expanding Medicaid and creating its own exchange and trying to create more competition in the marketplace. The governor refused to do both. An organization representing insurance carriers warned lawmakers at the National Conference of State Legislatures that states that don’t expand Medicaid would see higher premiums, he said, because insurance companies would shift the cost of that uncompensated care.
    From what I've read, Obamacare lowers the cost in states where they are actually trying to make it work. Unsurprisingly, it doesn't work in states where they are refusing to make it work for political reasons. I think it sucks that conservative politicians would rather grandstand than suck it up and make it work the way it is supposed to. As usual, American people are the big losers in these stupid political battles.

    If you look at that same article, in CO we are doing the exchanges and are premiums are forecasted to drop 36% from what we have now.

    I don't have time to research which category TN falls into.
    Spacers likes this.
    -Alissa, mom to Tristan (5) and Reid (the baby!)

    Got an opinion? We've got a board! Come join us for some lively debate on the Face Off! Debate Arena board.

  9. #19
    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    7,706

    Default

    Expanding something that isn't working now isn't going to make it better.

    Expansion of Medicaid -- the jointly run federal-state health plan for low-income Americans -- has long been an essential element of progressives' vision for healthcare "reform."
    But it won't work. Medicaid already suffers from serious problems, including perpetual cost overruns, doctors who increasingly refuse to accept patients covered by the program, and low quality of care. Expanding Medicaid will only exacerbate these issues -- while doing little to improve the health of the people it covers.
    The debate over Medicaid expansion began in earnest in 2010, when the Affordable Care Act (ACA) -- otherwise known as Obamacare -- became law. The ACA incentivized states to expand their Medicaid programs by offering to cover 100 percent of the increased cost for the first three years -- and then 90 percent in subsequent years.
    Originally, this was an offer of the "can't be refused" variety. The ACA threatened to punish states that didn't expand by rescinding federal Medicaid funds for which they were already eligible.
    But in June 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the feds' threat was unconstitutional. States could forego Medicaid expansion without jeopardizing existing federal funding.
    Fully 21 states have taken up this option and refused to expand their Medicaid operations.
    There's good reason for their refusal.
    For starters, Medicaid patients often suffer from constrained access to care. Technically, they're "insured" -- but they can't find anyone to treat them.
    That's because fewer and fewer doctors are participating in the program. Between 2010 and 2011, a staggering 33 percent of doctors decided not to accept new Medicaid patients, chiefly because the program's reimbursement rates are incredibly low -- and often don't cover the cost of treatment.
    Last year, less than 70 percent of American doctors participated in Medicaid.
    Consequently, current beneficiaries have difficulty finding a physician who will accept their coverage. Once they do, they may have to wait a long time to actually see the doctor.
    Expanding the program will only exacerbate this state of affairs. In Massachusetts, for instance, which launched an Obamacare-style expansion of Medicaid on its own several years ago, just 66 percent of internists and 70 percent of family physicians accepted the state's Medicaid plan, according to a 2013 survey. In some counties, just 30 percent of family doctors take Medicaid.
    What's more, the care beneficiaries receive doesn't substantially improve their health. A major analysis of Oregon's Medicaid program found "no significant improvements" in health outcomes for patients enrolled in the program. Researchers reported that Medicaid coverage had virtually no effect on blood pressure, cholesterol levels, or blood sugar -- risk factors for chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes.
    All this evidence suggests that expanding Medicaid won't improve the health of the low-income Americans it's supposed to help. But it will drive up costs for state taxpayers.
    Supporters of the expansion claim that it's essentially free for states, with the federal government picking up the entire tab initially and then the bulk of it soon after.
    But that's hardly the case. The California Legislative Analyst's Office, for instance, estimates that the expansion will yield between $300 million and $1.3 billion in new annual public costs by 2020. The Congressional Budget Office puts the total cost to the states between 2014 and 2022 at $73 billion.
    Medicaid expansion will also strain the economy and slow job creation. A new paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research found that expanding the program actually discourages people from finding a job, because they no longer need to be employed to get coverage. The study estimated that the planned state-level expansions of Medicaid would cause between 530,000 and 940,000 people not to seek employment.
    Fortunately, many states aren't buying the false promise of Medicaid expansion. They know that it will prove wasteful and do little to improve access to care for low-income patients.
    Today, Medicaid delivers substandard care while strapping state governments with skyrocketing costs. Expanding this troubled program is a bad strategy for improving health care in America.
    PIPES: Expanding Medicaid: A foolish way to improve healthcare access - Your Houston News: Opinion
    Mom to Lee, Jake, Brandon, Rocco
    Stepmom to Ryan, Regan, Braden, Baley
    Granddaughters Kylie 10/18/2010 & Aleya 4/22/2013


    I never consider a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosopy, as a cause for withdrawing from a friend. --Thomas Jefferson

  10. #20
    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    12,517

    Default

    Watching the health care situation from a different country I'm still amazed that the United States of America is still so un-united. It is beyond my brain to even to try figure out why your federal and state governments can't get this figured out, really. It's like a gigantic menu has been put in front of y'all to select what insurance plan you want, and to cherry pick this and that because of your specific health care needs as individuals and families. Le sigh....So many other countries figured it out decades ago. It's mind boggling why the most powerful country in the world can't provide adequate and affordable health care for all its citizens. I think ACA is a step in the right direction, but has many faults. I hope it can all get straightened around.
    Spacers likes this.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 45 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
v -->

About Us | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Sitemap | Terms & Conditions