Photoshopping yearbook photos?

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MissyJ's picture
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Photoshopping yearbook photos?

Should schools be allowed to Photoshop your child's picture for the yearbook? What policy would you find reasonable?

[h=1]Utah high school 'learned lessons' after altering yearbook photos of girls[/h]

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No, they shouldn't. That's ridiculous! If they have specific standards for the photos (although I think theirs are silly) then they have to say so before the pictures are done, and say that if you don't agree to abide by them, your photo doesn't get in.

If you want kids to cover tattoos or not wear low-cut shirts, say so ahead of time and say so AT photo time.

And why the heck are they covering shoulders? Oy.

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I don't agree with it at all. Like Laurie said, if they were going to have restrictions you need to make them known ahead of time.

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Although I disagree with the restrictions they have in place at this school (no bare shoulders? what is that?) The school posted a sign at the picture taking that said they reserved the right to Photoshop any pictures and stated what was appropriate attire.
I think the school should have had a school employee at the picture taking to ensure guidelines were being followed instead of altered the pictures.

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"mom3girls" wrote:

Although I disagree with the restrictions they have in place at this school (no bare shoulders? what is that?) The school posted a sign at the picture taking that said they reserved the right to Photoshop any pictures and stated what was appropriate attire.
I think the school should have had a school employee at the picture taking to ensure guidelines were being followed instead of altered the pictures.

From the article:

Yet none of the girls remember seeing any such sign or recall being warned that their photo could be changed. In fact, after the photos were taken, students were given the opportunity to examine their photos before they were submitted to the yearbook. Nielsen and Montoya approved their photos, which were unaltered at the time. This only added to the surprise when they received their yearbooks months later.

It sounds like the sign wasn't really prominent and the policy wasn't made clear. Certainly if they were given photos to approve that hadn't been altered, that was sneaky behavior on the school's part. When you give someone something for approval, it's supposed to be the final version.