Pledge of Allegiance in Spanish?

31 posts / 0 new
Last post
boilermaker's picture
Joined: 08/21/02
Posts: 1984
Pledge of Allegiance in Spanish?

At the bus stop yesterday a friend of mine shared that her son (in kindergarten) is learning the Pledge of Allegiance in Spanish. The class says the Pledge in English and then again in Spanish, each morning at the start of the school day.

What do you think of this?

To give you context, the school that he attends has a population of students where 40% come from non-English speaking households. Some of the kids show up on the first day of school without any English at all.

Should the Pledge only be said in English?

culturedmom's picture
Joined: 09/30/06
Posts: 1131

I think it would be awesome to learn the Pledge in English, Spanish, French, Japanese, and any other language one could think of. I think learning other languages is one of the best gifts a child or anyone could get. Why would anyone be upset to find out their kid is being taught another language?

Or is it just because it is the pledge and for some insane notion American's think that unless the Pledge is sung in English it is somehow hurting the US? Or would people be mad that teaching English speaking kids another language is pandering to non-English speakers? I guess I don't see why anyone would be upset so I am not sure how to debate this.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

I think that it is awesome for both the English and Spanish speakers that they are saying it in both languages! I hope my kids school does something like that!

Joined: 01/18/06
Posts: 1626

I think it's a great idea! In Canada we sing our National Anthem in both of our official languages, even in schools where it is mostly English speaking. I know Spanish isn't an official language of the US, but I think it would be wonderful to embrace other languages, especially one that is so prominent in your country.

Joined: 12/06/08
Posts: 2

I think it's great that they are saying the pledge at all. I might be offended if they were only saying it in Spanish but since they are saying it in both languages, I have no problem with it.

boilermaker's picture
Joined: 08/21/02
Posts: 1984

This mother shared it bc she was upset-- but I didn't share her sentiment and it surprised her.

I though it was cool and a good opportunity for all of the kids. Heck, the hardest school to get into in our district is a full spanish immersion school-- they teach one week in english and one week in spanish so that all of the kids learn both languages.

She also didn't like that her 2nd grader's teacher had *two* pictures of Obama hanging in their classroom. I had to remind her that he is our president.....which she conceded was true.

I would prefer that they say the pledge and remove the "under God" portion.....but I like the fact they are saying it in both languages.

carg0612's picture
Joined: 09/23/09
Posts: 1554

I agree with pp. I think it's great that the Spanish speaking children are learning it in English and the English speaking students are learning it in Spanish! My DS#1's class had a month where they did the pledge in sign language!

Very cool.

Joined: 01/18/06
Posts: 1626

Wow. That's so strange for someone to feel that way, Audra. I mean, it's not political. It's not religious. It's a language. A beautiful language. And one that is very common in your country.

Well, I guess haters gonna hate. Some people take things too far when they get their priorities clouded.

Joined: 03/14/09
Posts: 624

Although I think that the pledge itself is very odd, I think it's great that they are learning it in a second language. Learning a second language can only help, think of all the new brain cells those kids are using.

Joined: 11/29/06
Posts: 1316

I think it's a great idea. In high school I sang the anthem over the PA every morning for 2 years (people must have gotten sick of me) and I alternated between English and French because those are our official languages and it's nice to mix it up a bit.

I see nothing wrong with it and I don't know why anyone would get so upset. Its not like you're changing around the meaning or wording of the Pledge of Allegiance you're just saying it in a different language.

LiveFreeOrDie's picture
Joined: 09/15/05
Posts: 115

This debate was EPIC like 4-5 years ago.

Actually, that was the national anthem in Spanish.

How the debate board has changed. G-D liberals!

Starryblue702's picture
Joined: 04/06/11
Posts: 5454

I don't have any issues with kids learning a second language in school at any age, but it's my belief that they're teaching the children the Pledge in spanish not to diversify them in any way, but because so many of the children can't speak english... and this is a very big problem for me. I got the stats from my children's school this past week as it was their first week back to school, and out of the 700 children in attendance, 200 of them speak little to no english. Tell me how they're supposed to learn anything first off, and secondly, that's completely not fair to my children (and everyone else's child that speaks english) as that's time taken away from them being taught because the teacher surely has to spend a great deal of time with these non-english speaking students to get them to learn anything. Now don't misunderstand me, this is in no way the fault of the childs, but of their parents for not teaching them english as well as their native language... and one can only assume that they didn't teach them english because the parents themselves can't speak it. Also, the public school system has a hard enough time teaching my kids the basics (at least here in Nevada, as I believe this state is ranked #48 in the worst school stats, like smarts, graduation, and teaching overall), so if this were going on here it would upset me. How about teach my children what they absolutely need, which is reading, writing, science, math, geography, history, and everything else before you start in on the second language. I know this is an entirely different debate, so sorry I took it this far, but I felt the need to back up my answer.

mommytoMR.FACE's picture
Joined: 04/10/09
Posts: 781

"Starryblue702" wrote:

I don't have any issues with kids learning a second language in school at any age, but it's my belief that they're teaching the children the Pledge in spanish not to diversify them in any way, but because so many of the children can't speak english... and this is a very big problem for me. I got the stats from my children's school this past week as it was their first week back to school, and out of the 700 children in attendance, 200 of them speak little to no english. Tell me how they're supposed to learn anything first off, and secondly, that's completely not fair to my children (and everyone else's child that speaks english) as that's time taken away from them being taught because the teacher surely has to spend a great deal of time with these non-english speaking students to get them to learn anything. Now don't misunderstand me, this is in no way the fault of the childs, but of their parents for not teaching them english as well as their native language... and one can only assume that they didn't teach them english because the parents themselves can't speak it. Also, the public school system has a hard enough time teaching my kids the basics (at least here in Nevada, as I believe this state is ranked #48 in the worst school stats, like smarts, graduation, and teaching overall), so if this were going on here it would upset me. How about teach my children what they absolutely need, which is reading, writing, science, math, geography, history, and everything else before you start in on the second language. I know this is an entirely different debate, so sorry I took it this far, but I felt the need to back up my answer.

Children learn languages at a very fast pace.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32013276/ns/health-childrens_health/t/unraveling-how-kids-become-bilingual-so-easily/#.TmQt85hCYoY

http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2007-01-09-language-children_x.htm

Not only is learning a foreign language easier for children than it is for adults, but children who are exposed to other languages also do better in school, score higher on standardized tests, are better problem solvers and are more open to diversity....

So I would actually think your children would be at an advantage because they could learn something from the "non english" speaking children.

Back to the OP, it's great they are teaching it in Spanish. They should teach it in French, German, and other languages as well.

Starryblue702's picture
Joined: 04/06/11
Posts: 5454

"mommytoMR.FACE" wrote:

Children learn languages at a very fast pace.

I agree completely. However, they need to be taught the basics before any other language comes in. We all know they're not going to be taught the entire spanish language in kindergarden, nor would it be followed up through high school. I was never taught another language until I had to pick one as an elective in high school. Why? Because the basics had to be taught to me beforehand. Our education system has a hard enough time teaching our children how to read and write (and again, I'm speaking as a Nevadan, which has pretty much the worst rating when it comes to education), so until they get those basics down, they need to stick to english in the classroom. And to take your quote another way, I also agree, which is why the parents of these non-english speaking children should be teaching them english as well. There were three kids in my son's kindergarden class last year that spoke their parent's native language (one Russian, one Spanish, and one Tagalo) as well as english, and I think that's wonderful. Not only are they already fluent in two languages, but it won't hinder them in the classroom.

mommytoMR.FACE's picture
Joined: 04/10/09
Posts: 781

"Starryblue702" wrote:

I agree completely. However, they need to be taught the basics before any other language comes in. We all know they're not going to be taught the entire spanish language in kindergarden, nor would it be followed up through high school. I was never taught another language until I had to pick one as an elective in high school. Why? Because the basics had to be taught to me beforehand. Our education system has a hard enough time teaching our children how to read and write (and again, I'm speaking as a Nevadan, which has pretty much the worst rating when it comes to education), so until they get those basics down, they need to stick to english in the classroom. And to take your quote another way, I also agree, which is why the parents of these non-english speaking children should be teaching them english as well. There were three kids in my son's kindergarden class last year that spoke their parent's native language (one Russian, one Spanish, and one Tagalo) as well as english, and I think that's wonderful. Not only are they already fluent in two languages, but it won't hinder them in the classroom.

I disagree. If you look at other parts of the world, for example in Turkey, my little cousin was taught English from the very first time she stepped into a daycare, all the way through high school.

Oh yeah, before my kiddo was taught the "basics" he was learning sign language as a baby. He could sign "more" before he could even say the basic "mama." As a baby, my mother would speak Turkish to me and my father would speak English to me. I learned two languages at the same time. One of my articles I pasted actually goes into how babies can learn two languages at once, before having to learn "the basics."

And what are the "basics" you feel like us American English speakers (which is a very unsophisticated language if you ask me) need to be taught first before Uno, Dos, Tres, can ever before introduced?

wlillie's picture
Joined: 09/17/07
Posts: 1796

Deniz. She is saying that the Spanish speaking students who don't understand the language being used to teach them are going to fall behind because they don't understand the language they are being taught with. And that means that the English speaking students are going to be falling behind becasue they have to wait for the Spanish speaking students to catch up on the language that is being used as our unofficial language. No one is saying not to teach your kid sign language or any other language, just that it's a disservice to the students (both Spanish and English speaking) that 20% of them don't understand the words coming out of their teacher's mouths.

mommytoMR.FACE's picture
Joined: 04/10/09
Posts: 781

"wlillie" wrote:

Deniz. She is saying that the Spanish speaking students who don't understand the language being used to teach them are going to fall behind because they don't understand the language they are being taught with. And that means that the English speaking students are going to be falling behind becasue they have to wait for the Spanish speaking students to catch up on the language that is being used as our unofficial language. No one is saying not to teach your kid sign language or any other language, just that it's a disservice to the students (both Spanish and English speaking) that 20% of them don't understand the words coming out of their teacher's mouths.

Lillie. I know what she is saying and I'm disagreeing with it and we are also debating on small tangents branching off from the main point. I don't believe any of the children will fall behind nor will it be unfair to the American kiddos.

Starryblue702's picture
Joined: 04/06/11
Posts: 5454

"mommytoMR.FACE" wrote:

I disagree. If you look at other parts of the world, for example in Turkey, my little cousin was taught English from the very first time she stepped into a daycare, all the way through high school.

Oh yeah, before my kiddo was taught the "basics" he was learning sign language as a baby. He could sign "more" before he could even say the basic "mama." As a baby, my mother would speak Turkish to me and my father would speak English to me. I learned two languages at the same time. One of my articles I pasted actually goes into how babies can learn two languages at once, before having to learn "the basics."

And what are the "basics" you feel like us American English speakers (which is a very unsophisticated language if you ask me) need to be taught first before Uno, Dos, Tres, can ever before introduced?

And as I said in the post before, I think it's wonderful that parents teach children a second language at home before school, whether it's verbal or not (like signing). What I have a problem with is them teaching it in school at such a young age when they need to be learning other more important things. And I'll say again, even though I said this in the last post, that "basics" are math, enlish, writing, reading, science, history, geography, and things like that. I didn't say you shouldn't introduce those other languages, but I think it should be the parent to do so if they so choose, not the schools doing it... if it's before high school.

"wlillie" wrote:

Deniz. She is saying that the Spanish speaking students who don't understand the language being used to teach them are going to fall behind because they don't understand the language they are being taught with. And that means that the English speaking students are going to be falling behind becasue they have to wait for the Spanish speaking students to catch up on the language that is being used as our unofficial language. No one is saying not to teach your kid sign language or any other language, just that it's a disservice to the students (both Spanish and English speaking) that 20% of them don't understand the words coming out of their teacher's mouths.

Thank you!!

wlillie's picture
Joined: 09/17/07
Posts: 1796

"mommytoMR.FACE" wrote:

Lillie. I know what she is saying and I'm disagreeing with it and we are also debating on small tangents branching off from the main point. I don't believe any of the children will fall behind nor will it be unfair to the American kiddos.

So you don't think that even Jace might fall a little behind if you guys moved to Germany and he went to a school that didn't have English as their primary language? He'd be able to keep up with the kids who understand the language and no one would even notice the kid who was unable to understand what was going on in class?

I'm sorry, that's just ridiculous. One of the tangents was the fact that a lot of kids don't have any English in their vocabulary when they start school. That's what she was speaking on. If you really did understand what she was trying to say and that was your honest response, I'll let it go.

And English may be unsophisticated, but it's still the primary language spoken here. To not teach it to your child and send them out into the school system is irresponsible parenting. We're military so there is a really huge chance we'll be moving to another country in the next 12 years. I fully intend on teaching/learning the language when we go because I don't want my kid to be lost even if it's only for 3 years. Why is it so bad to expect parents that live here to try and do the same thing when they usually plan on being here permanently?

Joined: 03/14/09
Posts: 624

"wlillie" wrote:

To not teach it to your child and send them out into the school system is irresponsible parenting.

No, it's most certainly not. It's not the way you do things, but it may be the most responsible thing a parent of a bilingual child does. The Minority Language At Home method is probably the best way for kids to keep up more than one language.

Joined: 03/14/09
Posts: 624

"Starryblue702" wrote:

What I have a problem with is them teaching it in school at such a young age when they need to be learning other more important things.

Languages are the best thing one can teach a child. If a child can figure out how to reason between two dominant languages, they can understand the reason behind science and math, and their language arts and social studies grades will improve as well, as they are getting direct, first-hand knowledge about language and different cultures.

Bilinguals constantly outperform monolinguals on a variety of tests- and they will stave off Alzheimer's as they grow up! Will learning math prevent cancer? Of course not!

The "kids need to learn their own language before a second" theory is out of date and not grounded in any linguistic or pedagogical research.

"Starryblue702" wrote:

I didn't say you shouldn't introduce those other languages, but I think it should be the parent to do so if they so choose, not the schools doing it... if it's before high school.

High school is too late.

mommytoMR.FACE's picture
Joined: 04/10/09
Posts: 781

"wlillie" wrote:

So you don't think that even Jace might fall a little behind if you guys moved to Germany and he went to a school that didn't have English as their primary language? He'd be able to keep up with the kids who understand the language and no one would even notice the kid who was unable to understand what was going on in class?

I'm sorry, that's just ridiculous. One of the tangents was the fact that a lot of kids don't have any English in their vocabulary when they start school. That's what she was speaking on. If you really did understand what she was trying to say and that was your honest response, I'll let it go.

And English may be unsophisticated, but it's still the primary language spoken here. To not teach it to your child and send them out into the school system is irresponsible parenting. We're military so there is a really huge chance we'll be moving to another country in the next 12 years. I fully intend on teaching/learning the language when we go because I don't want my kid to be lost even if it's only for 3 years. Why is it so bad to expect parents that live here to try and do the same thing when they usually plan on being here permanently?

I had kids come from different countries when I was in school, and they didn't speak a lick of English. They all passed with flying colors, with help from teachers, and even classmates. Nobody else fell behind.

If Jace went to Germany, I would have no worries in his schooling. He would do just fine and he would learn the language faster than I ever could.

My aunt moved to the states when she was 6 and didn't speak a lick of English and she didn't fall behind and neither did other students.

This thinking with American English being the all mighty language and thinking we're the all mighty country and there isn't room for anyone else or any other language until they learn our language is ridiculous. Sending a child to school to learn, no matter the demographics of the child, is what makes the most sense.

Joined: 11/28/06
Posts: 848

"mommytoMR.FACE" wrote:

I had kids come from different countries when I was in school, and they didn't speak a lick of English. They all passed with flying colors, with help from teachers, and even classmates. Nobody else fell behind.

If Jace went to Germany, I would have no worries in his schooling. He would do just fine and he would learn the language faster than I ever could.

My aunt moved to the states when she was 6 and didn't speak a lick of English and she didn't fall behind and neither did other students.

This thinking with American English being the all mighty language and thinking we're the all mighty country and there isn't room for anyone else or any other language until they learn our language is ridiculous. Sending a child to school to learn, no matter the demographics of the child, is what makes the most sense.

You paint a pretty picture, but that isn't always reality. Students learning English as a second language often do struggle in school and it can be a very discouraging environment for them. Imagine not being able to understand ANYTHING that the teacher or your peers are trying to tell you. Students not only have a new language to learn, but the cultural expectations can sometimes present a challenge as well. To say that children can come to the US without knowing English and never struggle in school, passing with "flying colors" because you know a few who did is silly. Their struggles are real and should be acknowledged.

That being said, I have no problem with the pledge being taught in Spanish or any other language for that matter. How awesome for the Spanish speaking students to feel included, special, and an "expert" on the activity when they often feel outcasted. I think it would be fun for the Native Spanish speakers to teach the class fun little poems or songs in Spanish as a class building activity. Everyone benefits from activities like that.

culturedmom's picture
Joined: 09/30/06
Posts: 1131

"wlillie" wrote:

And English may be unsophisticated, but it's still the primary language spoken here. To not teach it to your child and send them out into the school system is irresponsible parenting. We're military so there is a really huge chance we'll be moving to another country in the next 12 years. I fully intend on teaching/learning the language when we go because I don't want my kid to be lost even if it's only for 3 years. Why is it so bad to expect parents that live here to try and do the same thing when they usually plan on being here permanently?

I think this whole paragraph is dripping with priviledge and ignorance of the issues of ESL students and families. It's like you are going off the premise that ESL children can't speak English because their parents just refuse to teach them. Why would anyone think that? To equate the experience of an imigrant coming to this country out of necessity with your experience of moving to another country through work is insane. That's wonderful you will have the tools and financial ability and education to be able to help your children aclimate and assimilate to their new school. But actually, according to you, your kids should know the language before they even get their or else you are irresponsible.

However, I doubt that poor families who imigrate to this country, work in the fields or likemy father, came here before their parents, has the ability to teach their kids English let alone learn it themselves. Just the act of leaving everythign behind and come to the US in order to give their children a future, in my book make them way better parents then I. And to call them irresponsible is degrading and offensive.

By the way, what makes you think that the parents aren't helping their kids as much as possible to learn English at home? I mean fro heavne sakes, give these people a break. You want them to leave everything behind, come to a new country, and know English in a week? a month? How many languages have your learned in your free time?

mommytoMR.FACE's picture
Joined: 04/10/09
Posts: 781

"Alana*sMommy" wrote:

You paint a pretty picture, but that isn't always reality. Students learning English as a second language often do struggle in school and it can be a very discouraging environment for them. Imagine not being able to understand ANYTHING that the teacher or your peers are trying to tell you. Students not only have a new language to learn, but the cultural expectations can sometimes present a challenge as well. To say that children can come to the US without knowing English and never struggle in school, passing with "flying colors" because you know a few who did is silly. Their struggles are real and should be acknowledged.

Every kid struggles here and there, native speakers and foreign speakers, and I'm not saying to ignore them. Teachers stay after school to help, and other peers also help. There is a lot of help, or at least in the schools I have attended. They learn a lot by doing, not only by listening (granted I know you probably know that since you're a teacher).

How do foreign people pass ESL classes? The teachers only speak English to them yet most of them are able to be successful without understanding one thing being said to them. It really all depends on how everything is taught, whether you are learning American English or another foreign language.

Joined: 11/28/06
Posts: 848

"mommytoMR.FACE" wrote:

Every kid struggles here and there, native speakers and foreign speakers, and I'm not saying to ignore them. Teachers stay after school to help, and other peers also help. There is a lot of help, or at least in the schools I have attended. They learn a lot by doing, not only by listening (granted I know you probably know that since you're a teacher).

How do foreign people pass ESL classes? The teachers only speak English to them yet most of them are able to be successful without understanding one thing being said to them. It really all depends on how everything is taught, whether you are learning American English or another foreign language.

Maybe it is the cold medicine I'm taking, but this post really confuses me. What do you mean, "They learn a lot by doing?" and "It really all depends on how everything is taught"? And how can someone be successful if they don't understand anything that is said to them? (That statement baffles me the most)

To say that "every kid struggles here and there" really downplays the struggles that ESOL students go through. To be successful they must work twice as hard as their English speaking peers and I think they deserve mad credit for that.

wlillie's picture
Joined: 09/17/07
Posts: 1796

"culturedmom" wrote:

I think this whole paragraph is dripping with priviledge and ignorance of the issues of ESL students and families. It's like you are going off the premise that ESL children can't speak English because their parents just refuse to teach them. Why would anyone think that? To equate the experience of an imigrant coming to this country out of necessity with your experience of moving to another country through work is insane. That's wonderful you will have the tools and financial ability and education to be able to help your children aclimate and assimilate to their new school. But actually, according to you, your kids should know the language before they even get their or else you are irresponsible.

However, I doubt that poor families who imigrate to this country, work in the fields or likemy father, came here before their parents, has the ability to teach their kids English let alone learn it themselves. Just the act of leaving everythign behind and come to the US in order to give their children a future, in my book make them way better parents then I. And to call them irresponsible is degrading and offensive.

By the way, what makes you think that the parents aren't helping their kids as much as possible to learn English at home? I mean fro heavne sakes, give these people a break. You want them to leave everything behind, come to a new country, and know English in a week? a month? How many languages have your learned in your free time?

"blather" wrote:

No, it's most certainly not. It's not the way you do things, but it may be the most responsible thing a parent of a bilingual child does. The Minority Language At Home method is probably the best way for kids to keep up more than one language.

I disagree. You should teach both if you have two. And you should speak the language of the land you live in.

There are plenty of programs to help people learn English that are free. My next door neighbors moved here a few years ago and taught there children Spanish and English. No clue how they learned English, but I can tell you they aren't super duper rich and definitely aren't super duper brilliant.

How many of that 20% do you think were raised in the US from birth? I'm betting that it's a huge chunk. I'm not talking about the parents who come here and then enroll their kids a few months later, but if your kid has been here for 4/5 years with you, then I don't care what you guys say, it was irresponsible not to learn the language and teach it to their kids.

I tried to learn Spanish, but at the time I was living in SW Louisiana and it died because I didn't have anyone to speak it with. You can't say the same for learning English in the US. My husband speaks a little Japanese and Russian, but he is much smarter and has a much better memory than I do.

I'm not against the pledge of allegiance being said in Spanish or even a few immersion classes (if the school can afford them), but it does bother me that these kids have a huge hurdle to overcome and all students pay the price.

We call parents irresponsible all the time and I'm pretty firm in my belief that there are a few things kids need before they go to school. If they sent their kids to school without anything else they needed, then it wouldn't be degrading and offensive to call them irresponsible, why something as important as the ability to communicate with the people they'll be surrounded by all day?

Can you imagine what happens to the poor kid who does speak both when the English speaking teacher needs to tell the only Spanish speaking kid something? I bet they are interpreters all day long (which some kids might enjoy, but that means they are missing something they should be doing instead).

Joined: 11/28/06
Posts: 848

"wlillie" wrote:

I disagree. You should teach both if you have two. And you should speak the language of the land you live in.

There are plenty of programs to help people learn English that are free. My next door neighbors moved here a few years ago and taught there children Spanish and English. No clue how they learned English, but I can tell you they aren't super duper rich and definitely aren't super duper brilliant.

How many of that 20% do you think were raised in the US from birth? I'm betting that it's a huge chunk. I'm not talking about the parents who come here and then enroll their kids a few months later, but if your kid has been here for 4/5 years with you, then I don't care what you guys say, it was irresponsible not to learn the language and teach it to their kids.

I tried to learn Spanish, but at the time I was living in SW Louisiana and it died because I didn't have anyone to speak it with. You can't say the same for learning English in the US. My husband speaks a little Japanese and Russian, but he is much smarter and has a much better memory than I do.

I'm not against the pledge of allegiance being said in Spanish or even a few immersion classes (if the school can afford them), but it does bother me that these kids have a huge hurdle to overcome and all students pay the price.

We call parents irresponsible all the time and I'm pretty firm in my belief that there are a few things kids need before they go to school. If they sent their kids to school without anything else they needed, then it wouldn't be degrading and offensive to call them irresponsible, why something as important as the ability to communicate with the people they'll be surrounded by all day?

Can you imagine what happens to the poor kid who does speak both when the English speaking teacher needs to tell the only Spanish speaking kid something? I bet they are interpreters all day long (which some kids might enjoy, but that means they are missing something they should be doing instead).

Why do you think "all students pay the price?" In every classroom there are varying ability levels, which is why teachers must be pros at differentiated instruction. Do you think "all students pay the price" when ESE students are integrated into the regular ed classroom too?

Something we've found to be helpful at my school is grouping the ESOL kids together with a Spanish speaking teacher. Most of the ESOL kids at my school are Native Spanish speakers and we've placed a Spanish speaking teacher on each grade level (some have more than one). The teacher can give basic commands in both Spanish and English but the instruction is done only in English. The kids feel more at ease because they can easily communicate with the teacher in their native language and they have similar peers in their classroom (about 1/2 the class is ESOL). The students that do not speak Spanish at the beginning of the year finish the year being able to say/understand some basic phrases and conversational Spanish. Win-win situation.

Joined: 03/14/09
Posts: 624

"wlillie" wrote:

And you should speak the language of the land you live in.

That would be irresponsible and immoral. But not everyone fits into your tiny little mold. It's not enough to just teach a second language, for fluency, and literacy, people need immersion. Just because you don't value it doesn't mean it's not important. Luckily I live in a country that is free, and I can speak whatever language I want at home.

wlillie's picture
Joined: 09/17/07
Posts: 1796

I don't understand what you are saying. How is what you quoted irresponsible or immoral?

We live in a free country too. You are completely within your rights to speak whatever language you want. However, you are being irresponsible if you don't teach your children to speak the language that the people around them are speaking. And if you don't know it and have a school age child, it is your responsibility as a parent to learn it. People who speak Spanish in the US totally have an advantage with the whole immersion thing especially since most of the places I've lived have adult free or cheap ESL classes. I do value second languages, and I totally agree you need immersion. I said that in a different way in that post.

And I don't have a tiny little mold. That's just ridiculous; I don't see where you got that from any of my posts.

I value diversity immensely, but I do think that you should try to integrate into the society you live in or it hurts your chances of success. Not teaching a kid in the US to speak (at least basic) English before sending them to school is irresponsible.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3189

Oh, I remember this one well.

I think teaching your kids to speak the language of the country they're in is extremely important.

I think having kids learn languages at a very young age -- the younger the better -- is immensely valuable and wonderful.

I think teaching kids the Pledge -- as weird as I honestly think the whole Pledge-saying thing is, being from Canada where we don't have to do such things -- in Spanish is fantastic. It helps the English speakers learn Spanish because they already know the Pledge. It helps the Spanish kids connect their own heritage/backgrounds to the country they are in. It seems like one big win-win for me.

I also think that in every class there are kids who have to work harder to keep up, and kids who are frustrated with having to slow down. Seems like there could be some great solutions involving pairing people up, if the issue is language and not levels of learning difficulty or academic achievement. I think the possibilities are endless.

I really can't find a negative to having the Pledge said in Spanish in the classroom. Doesn't harm anyone, helps everyone, teaches a good lesson.