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Thread: Political Asylum for homeschooling?

  1. #11
    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    I have no will power at all. I wanted to stay away from this debate.

    I will just say this. There are at leas a million homeschoolers in the US (How Many Homeschoolers Are There? - FamilyEducation.com). Obama could not ban homeschooling on a national level even if it was his sole agenda. There is no part of me that thinks that there is any danger of the US banning homeschooling. Individual States might try to, but on a Federal level, that is just not going to happen.

    The US also does not have to accept anyone into the country that they do not want to.
    I agree with you realistically it could never happen here, our constitution would never allow it. I still think this is a case of religious persecution because these parents are choosing to homeschool their children for religious reasons and if they go back to Germany they could have their children taken away for it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    Where on Earth are you getting this idea from? Has anyone seriously suggested that Obama wants to try to ban homeschooling? Since when has the U.S. adopted policies based on what Germany does?
    From the article in the post above mine. I was not saying that I believed Obama wanted to ban homeschooling, I was saying the opposite of that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Potter75 View Post
    The fact that you think that this has anything to do with the US banning homeschool frightens me a little.
    This post cements the fact that I will be attacked for anything I say, even if we have the same opinion.
    Rivergallery and SID081108 like this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    This post cements the fact that I will be attacked for anything I say, even if we have the same opinion.
    No need to take it personally. You made a comment, seemingly out of thin air, about how Obama won't be able to ban homeschooling. It really sounded like you thought he was going to try. And I didn't read "the article" you mentioned, because it's not a news article, it's one blogger's opinion piece, so I didn't make the connection. Perhaps next time, adding the quote you're referring to would help us not think you mean something you don't.
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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    The article makes the point that the U.S. could try to make the same argument against homeschooling here that it is using to say these people should go ho home. Though I don't think it would fly in the U.S. I do think it is a valid point.

    When the United States government says that homeschooling is a mutable choice—they are saying that it is a characteristic that a government can legitimately coerce you to change. In other words, you have no protected right to choose the education for your children. Our nation could remove your ability to homeschool and your choice would be mutable—since the government has the authority to force you to implement their wishes.

    The prospect for German homeschooling freedom is not bright. But we should not reserve all of our concern for the views of the German government. Our own government is attempting to send German homeschoolers back to that land to face criminal prosecutions with fines, jail sentences, and removal of custody of children.

    We should understand that in these arguments by the U.S. government, something important is being said about our own liberties as American homeschoolers.

    The Attorney General of the United States thinks that a law that bans homeschooling entirely violates no fundamental liberties.

    It is important that Americans stand up for the rights of German homeschooling families. In so doing, we stand up for our own.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlyssaEimers View Post
    This post cements the fact that I will be attacked for anything I say, even if we have the same opinion.
    Yes Bonita. Okay.
    Last edited by Potter75; 05-14-2013 at 05:33 PM.

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    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
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    When the United States government says that homeschooling is a mutable choice—they are saying that it is a characteristic that a government can legitimately coerce you to change. In other words, you have no protected right to choose the education for your children.
    Except that is NOT what the U.S. government is saying. The U.S. government is saying only that the desire to homeschool your children in a country where it is illegal is not a human rights offense worthy of asylum.

    It's not up to the U.S. to set the laws in all other countries. Citizens of those countries can either deal with them, work to change them, or immigrate legally to another country. These folks didn't choose any of those options. They also didn't choose to move to one of the European countries that allows homeschooling, which probably would have been far easier & cheaper than coming to the U.S. I'm curious what the back story is....
    Last edited by Spacers; 05-14-2013 at 06:28 PM.
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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    Except that is NOT what the U.S. government is saying. The U.S. government is saying only that the desire to homeschool your children in a country where it is illegal is not a human rights offense worthy of asylum.

    It's not up to the U.S. to set the laws in all other countries. Citizens of those countries can either deal with them, work to change them, or immigrate legally to another country. These folks didn't choose any of those options. They also didn't choose to move to one of the European countries that allows homeschooling, which probably would have been far easier & cheaper than coming to the U.S. I'm curious what the back story is....
    That is not the only thing they are saying. They are saying there was no religious discrimination in refusing to allow them to homeschool.

    A second argument is revealing. The U.S. government contended that the Romeikes’ case failed to show that there was any discrimination based on religion because, among other reasons, the Romeikes did not prove that all homeschoolers were religious, and that not all Christians believed they had to homeschool.

    This argument demonstrates another form of dangerous “group think” by our own government. The central problem here is that the U.S. government does not understand that religious freedom is an individual right. One need not be a part of any church or other religious group to be able to make a religious freedom claim. Specifically, one doesn’t have to follow the dictates of a church to claim religious freedom—one should be able to follow the dictates of God Himself.

    The United States Supreme Court has made it very clear in the past that religious freedom is an individual right. Yet our current government does not seem to understand this. They only think of us as members of groups and factions. It is an extreme form of identity politics that directly threatens any understanding of individual liberty.
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    Exactly. They would need to show that homeschooling is integral to their religion and for what little I know of their faith it is not. They could go to public school and continue religious education at home or at church. Germany is not saying they cannot practice their faith.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jessica80 View Post
    Exactly. They would need to show that homeschooling is integral to their religion and for what little I know of their faith it is not. They could go to public school and continue religious education at home or at church. Germany is not saying they cannot practice their faith.
    It is NOT just about the extra things that they could teach at home. It is about what the public school would be teaching them at school. Are you saying that public schools never teach anything that is contrary to Christian beliefs?
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