President Obama

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AlyssaEimers's picture
Joined: 08/22/06
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President Obama

Digital Report: President Obama Remarks on Trayvon Martin Case | Video - ABC News

Do you think it was wise of President Obama to speak out on the Trayvon Martin case? Do you think it is the federal Government's place to tell Florida whether or not they can have a Stand Your Ground law?

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3189

I didn't watch the video but I read excerpts. Made me remember why I used to like him so much.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3189

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

Digital Report: President Obama Remarks on Trayvon Martin Case | Video - ABC News

Do you think it was wise of President Obama to speak out on the Trayvon Martin case? Do you think it is the federal Government's place to tell Florida whether or not they can have a Stand Your Ground law?

To be more specific:

Yes, I think it was wise of the President to speak out on a topic that has caused a national dialogue. And yes, I think it's appropriate for the federal government to open a dialogue on a state law that needs further discussion. He didn't talk about mandating a change, he talked about addressing it.

Rivergallery's picture
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

It is the age old question and crack in the armor of the United States... the United part... Who has more rights the States or the Federal Government.
I think by addressing this shooting.. not just addressed the shooting but put a wedge into the racial crack.. and I think the real reason is a desire to bring the states more inline, and not have state laws ... instead making everything federally regulated... it is the desire for power, and control.. that is so prevalent today.

I do not see Obama, Al Sharpton nor other liberal black voices as healing the divide.. I see them as breaking it wide open, and creating a larger problem.
There are parts of the US where racism is very noticeable, and there are other parts where there is none. There are parts of the US where people do not care the color of skin, and breaking it open brings it up in areas that have healed from racial division.

So again.. though it is just one issue.. a shooting... It is addressing multiple issues, and Obama knows it.. he is a smart man. I give him that.

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
Posts: 1535

I agree with RG, this is an area where his comments bring more divides then unity. His comments on the day of the verdict were awesome, some of the best of his whole presidency, and he should have left it at that.

People like Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson have been hurting the racial divide for a long time now, wish they would step aside and let leaders take over that will bring some real results in racial relations

Joined: 04/12/03
Posts: 1686

"Rivergallery" wrote:

It is the age old question and crack in the armor of the United States... the United part... Who has more rights the States or the Federal Government.
I think by addressing this shooting.. not just addressed the shooting but put a wedge into the racial crack.. and I think the real reason is a desire to bring the states more inline, and not have state laws ... instead making everything federally regulated... it is the desire for power, and control.. that is so prevalent today.

I do not see Obama, Al Sharpton nor other liberal black voices as healing the divide.. I see them as breaking it wide open, and creating a larger problem.
There are parts of the US where racism is very noticeable, and there are other parts where there is none. There are parts of the US where people do not care the color of skin, and breaking it open brings it up in areas that have healed from racial division.

So again.. though it is just one issue.. a shooting... It is addressing multiple issues, and Obama knows it.. he is a smart man. I give him that.

IME, the place where I don't actually see racism, are the whitest places I've been. but in some of those same areas, I have heard the prejudices people hold.

I wish I could remember the term; I've drawn a complete blank. When there is true social healing, it stems from a major discord first. It's like this huge elephant in the room that is not going anywhere until someone starts screaming THERE IS AN ELEPHANT HERE!

As for Al Sharpton, I have a lot of respect for the man. We had an incident out here in 2007 (?) at a local high school. The 4 students and 1 parent who were involved called it racist because the employee involved was not black and they were. Sharpton immediately got involved. Since the whole thing was caught on tape, he dropped it once he got all of the facts. The community questioned their side of the story and ultimately, they pleaded guilty to criminal charges and got something like 6 months probation.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the march on Washington. We've come a long way but still have a ways to go. We can call it a states' rights all we want, but when it comes to civil rights, it's federal jurisdiction. It's been over 20 years since the Rodney King trial. All 4 were acquitted of the charges brought by the state; 2 were convicted of the federal charges of violating Rodney King's civil rights.

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

I admit that I only got to watch about the first ten minutes, so maybe I missed something really inflammatory, but in the first ten minutes he talked a lot about race and racism...and I don't see how his comments could be construed as widening the racial divide. I'm sorry, but racism is NOT dead in this country. It's gone a bit more underground maybe, like you're not likely to see crosses burning on a lot of front yards these days, but that doesn't mean it's gone and we don't have to talk about it anymore just because it makes people uncomfortable to talk about. That's what part of his speech was about, how frustrating it is to experience racism while people refuse to acknowledge that racism even still exists. Pretending its not a problem doesn't make it go away, if anything THAT widens the gap because you are invalidating people's experiences. It's maddening! Telling the truth about racism in this country doesn't make racism worse, and pretending that racism doesn't exist doesn't make racism better.

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
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"Alissa_Sal" wrote:

I admit that I only got to watch about the first ten minutes, so maybe I missed something really inflammatory, but in the first ten minutes he talked a lot about race and racism...and I don't see how his comments could be construed as widening the racial divide. I'm sorry, but racism is NOT dead in this country. It's gone a bit more underground maybe, like you're not likely to see crosses burning on a lot of front yards these days, but that doesn't mean it's gone and we don't have to talk about it anymore just because it makes people uncomfortable to talk about. That's what part of his speech was about, how frustrating it is to experience racism while people refuse to acknowledge that racism even still exists. Pretending its not a problem doesn't make it go away, if anything THAT widens the gap because you are invalidating people's experiences. It's maddening! Telling the truth about racism in this country doesn't make racism worse, and pretending that racism doesn't exist doesn't make racism better.

I agree that racism is not dead, but I dont believe that discussing it in reference to the Trayon Martin case is going to help take steps forward in solving it. Even Trayon's parents have said they dont believe that this is a case of racism. And the statistics bare out that Florida's stand your ground law has helped the black community substantially.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3189

I have no respect for Al Sharpton at all, and not much for what Jesse Jackson has become, but I think there is not really anywhere without racism and I think it was very important for Obama to speak up about it. I agree wholeheartedly that discussing it doesn't make it worse and ignoring it doesn't make it better.

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
Posts: 1535

I dont think this should be ignored either, but I dont believe outrage of a case that didnt involve racism is going to be effective.

Joined: 03/08/03
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"mom3girls" wrote:

I dont think this should be ignored either, but I dont believe outrage of a case that didnt involve racism is going to be effective.

I don't believe it didn't involve racism.

Joined: 04/12/03
Posts: 1686

"mom3girls" wrote:

I dont think this should be ignored either, but I dont believe outrage of a case that didnt involve racism is going to be effective.

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

I don't believe it didn't involve racism.

The Thomas theorem states that what we perceive to be real becomes real in its consequences. Whether it started out involving racism is not really relevant anymore. Maybe it did; maybe it didn't. But the consequences have made it a catalyst for what should be an open conversation on and confrontation of racism in America.

mom3girls's picture
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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

I don't believe it didn't involve racism.

What evidence are you basing this opinion on?

AlyssaEimers's picture
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6561

I think that Obama's comments on the subject catered to his base, but caused a greater divide among the rest of the country.

Rivergallery's picture
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I think that Obama's comments on the subject catered to his base, but caused a greater divide among the rest of the country.

His latino base? Wink

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I think that Obama's comments on the subject catered to his base, but caused a greater divide among the rest of the country.

How did it make the divide greater? What did he say specifically that people found problematic?

I agree with ethanwinfield, even if the Trayvon Martin case wasn't about race before (which I don't believe that race had zero to do with it, but whatever) the reactions to it across the country have had a lot to do with race, and I feel like that is what he was addressing much more so than the case itself. In the beginning of the speech he basically said "everyone did what they were supposed to do in this case and now it's over." I took that to mean lets move past this specific case and have a bigger conversation, the bigger conversation about race and racism that this case has already sparked.

GloriaInTX's picture
Joined: 07/29/08
Posts: 4116

I wish our black leaders today were half as wise as the man who said this:

Did you know that Negroes are 10 percent of the population of St. Louis and are responsible for 58 percent of its crimes? We've got to face that. And we have got to do something about our moral standards. We know there are many things wrong in the white world, but there are many things wrong in the black world too. We can't keep blaming the white man. There are things we must do for ourselves.
Martin Luther King, Jr

Rivergallery's picture
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

media likes silencing the black leaders that say that..
Voddie Beucham
Alan Keyes
Walter Williams
etc. Wink

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3189

"Alissa_Sal" wrote:

How did it make the divide greater? What did he say specifically that people found problematic?

I agree with ethanwinfield, even if the Trayvon Martin case wasn't about race before (which I don't believe that race had zero to do with it, but whatever) the reactions to it across the country have had a lot to do with race, and I feel like that is what he was addressing much more so than the case itself. In the beginning of the speech he basically said "everyone did what they were supposed to do in this case and now it's over." I took that to mean lets move past this specific case and have a bigger conversation, the bigger conversation about race and racism that this case has already sparked.

I agree 100%. 200%.

Spacers's picture
Joined: 12/29/03
Posts: 4100

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

To be more specific:

Yes, I think it was wise of the President to speak out on a topic that has caused a national dialogue. And yes, I think it's appropriate for the federal government to open a dialogue on a state law that needs further discussion. He didn't talk about mandating a change, he talked about addressing it.

"ethanwinfield" wrote:

IME, the place where I don't actually see racism, are the whitest places I've been. but in some of those same areas, I have heard the prejudices people hold.

I wish I could remember the term; I've drawn a complete blank. When there is true social healing, it stems from a major discord first. It's like this huge elephant in the room that is not going anywhere until someone starts screaming THERE IS AN ELEPHANT HERE!

ITA with both of these. I believe that President Obama *had* to talk about this. For him, as our country's first black President, to NOT talk about it, would have been to ignore that this case is something that everyone is, or should be, talking about. Whether the Martin case is about racism or not, it's started a conversation that needs to be had.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3189

Remember when Ronald Reagan DIDN'T talk about AIDS? At all? Huge omission.

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
Posts: 1535

I really feel like the best thing he could have done is reiterate that no evidence was ever presented that said this was race based, and then he could have pointed out any number of cases that were proven to be racist.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3189

"mom3girls" wrote:

I really feel like the best thing he could have done is reiterate that no evidence was ever presented that said this was race based, and then he could have pointed out any number of cases that were proven to be racist.

I don't think so at all. I think that would have been a disaster. He wasn't addressing specifically what happened in the courtroom. He was trying to address real race issues and I think what he said was very measured, intelligent, and perceptive. To deny that there was any racial factor in all of this (separate from "evidence presented") is naive.