PTSD

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AlyssaEimers's picture
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PTSD

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2014/02/president-george-w-bush-fights-to-take-disorder-out-of-ptsd/

President Bush is front and center in the news this week, a position he hasn’t frequently occupied since leaving office five years ago, stepping back into the spotlight to shine a spotlight of his own on post-9/11 veterans and his fight to take the “Disorder” out of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.
“We’re getting rid of the D,” he said. “PTS is an injury; it’s not a disorder. The problem is when you call it a disorder, [veterans] don’t think they can be treated.
“An employer says, ‘I don’t want to hire somebody with a disorder.’ And so our mission tomorrow is to begin to change the dialogue in the United States,” he said. “And we’ve got a lot of good support.”
According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, which still uses the designation “PTSD,” roughly 30 percent of post 9/11 veterans suffer from the malady, which hinders their reintegration into civilian society.
Though our troops have long since left Iraq and are on track to draw down in Afghanistan within the year, America’s veterans face a longer journey, and perhaps a harder struggle, on the home front. With a steep unemployment rate facing today’s veterans, The Bush Center’s recent joint study with Syracuse University only confirmed what so many vets are already aware of – their top priorities are jobs and education.
“It’s hard to put on your resume, ‘hire me; I was a sniper.’ I mean the average employer can’t figure out what that means,” Bush said.
“On the other hand, it took enormous courage and discipline and steadiness under pressure to be successful,” he said. “His job application, his job skill before, when employers better understand what he brings to the — would bring to their firm, they’re more likely to hire him.”
Bush said he is determined to ensure each and every veteran has a fighting chance.
“I have a duty,” Bush told ABC’s Martha Raddatz, sitting down during a summit organized by the George W. Bush Institute as part of its Military Service Initiative, at which Raddatz moderated the panels. ”Obviously I get slightly emotional talking about our vets because I have an emotional…” The former president trailed off. “I’m in there with them,” he concluded.
“These are men and women who volunteered in the face of danger. I mean, they knew right after 9/11 that the nation would seek justice and to protect ourselves,” he said. “And some got hurt, and some of them need a lot of help. And our nation owes a huge debt of gratitude.”
Jake Wood is one such soldier. After serving as Marine Corps squad leader in Iraq and a sniper in Afghanistan, the Medal of Valor recipient returned home and founded Team Rubicon, a nonprofit organization of veterans and doctors committed to changing disaster response. Together they’ve helped rehabilitate Joplin, Missouri, which was ravaged by a massive tornado, and the Jersey Shore, which was devastated by Hurricane Sandy.
Their latest rehab target, like that of the Bush Center, is veteran reintegration.
“Whether they have a job or not, there’s an opportunity for organizations like Team Rubicon, like The Mission Continues, to provide veterans with perhaps that sense of purpose, that sense of mission they had while they had the uniform on,” he said.
Wood continued to explain that from a veteran’s standpoint, support also begins by sharing experiences — a dialogue that is impeded, Wood said, both by a sense among the troops that “civilians won’t understand,” and by an assumption among civilians that returning soldiers don’t want to talk about their experiences.
“I think we can meet each other in the middle, and understand that really this is an issue of a lack of understanding,” Wood said. “How can we bring civilians and military service members together to share these stories so that there is a mutual understanding, so as a nation we can heal together?”
One way to do it is through dedicated volunteer work, and to that end, there are currently 46,000 non-governmental organizations that have been started to fight for our vets long after they’ve finished fighting for us.
“The work doesn’t end when the last troop leaves Afghanistan,” Wood said. “That’s only really when the work begins.”.

Debate - Should the D be dropped from PTSD?

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I'm sorry, I'm confused as the article doesn't seem connected to the debate question.

What is the issue?

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Is there another article to go with it?

AlyssaEimers's picture
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So sorry, I posted the wrong article. Let me go back and see if I can find it again.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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I fixed the OP. What happened was I read the article on my kindle and could not figure out how to post the entire article so I went down to the laptop to post it and did not re read to make sure I had the right article. Sorry.

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I think they should keep it. It IS a disorder that needs treatment, that's why it's called a disorder. People with it need help. And it's not just a term for those who have been in war; victims of violent crimes have it too. And I don't think people put it on their resumes, so I don't see how that would affect being hired, and if it does come up, I don't see what the difference would be between PTS and PTSD.

I think it's great to want to help but I think this is not an important piece of it. I actually think the word "disorder" helps legitimize the fact that they have been through something that needs to be taken seriously and treated. It's not just "stress"...it goes far beyond that.

Then again, I'm the daughter of a therapist (and a New Yorker, lol) so I don't see a stigma with these things.

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I do agree that it is an injury and not a disorder, those are 2 distinctly different things. But I dont believe taking disorder out of the title will change the stigma that comes with it.

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“An employer says, ‘I don’t want to hire somebody with a disorder.’

Hmmm...is that something you have to put on your job application?

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"mom3girls" wrote:

I do agree that it is an injury and not a disorder, those are 2 distinctly different things. But I dont believe taking disorder out of the title will change the stigma that comes with it.

What definitions are you using?

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I certainly don't think it's an injury.

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It is incorrect to call post-traumatic stress an injury; it is often the result of an injury, but it's the reaction to the injury or traumatic event that is disordered. Two people can experience the exact same traumatic event, even the same kind of injury, and react to it very differently. That's why it's correct to call PTSD a "disorder." Most people react to an injury or a traumatic event in a normal, expected pattern of grief or loss that they can work through in a normal, expected period of time with the normal, expected treatments. And then some people react to the same traumatic event in a disordered way that does not follow the regular, normal, expected patterns, that disrupts their ability to function in the normal, expected ways, and for which treatment in the normal, expected ways does not work.

I think rather than removing the word "disorder" from PTSD, we should be working to remove the stigma of the disorder from our society. PTSD is not, and should not be, a life-long burden. It's a treatable condition, and we should be getting our veterans the mental health support they need, the medication they need, so that they can move on from PTSD and live a disorder-free life.