Santa

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Santa

I was reading somewhere else a discussion about what to do if you do not do Santa in your house. I was a little surprised about the responses so I was wondering what you all thought.

If you do not teach Santa in your home, is it your responsibility to teach your children as young as 4 to tell other children that there is a Santa? If your child spills the beans about Santa, does the other child's parents have the right to be mad at you and your child?

ETA - for the purpose of this I am thinking of a child around 4 who might not really understand Santa.

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I've never stuck to the Santa story hardcore. When I explain Santa, I tell them the real story of him, and I explain that the Santa at the mall isn't the real one, but represents the man that lived many years ago. They've always known that the presents on Christmas morning come from mom and dad. They know not to talk about it around other children... but if it was to come out I wouldn't expect a parent to be mad about it... kids are kids, and Santa not being real is not the end of the world... they have to find out sometime.

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I do think that there is a certain degree of social responsibility that comes with not doing Santa at all, as the Santa myth is such a widespread and cultural norm in America. If we totally didn't do it at all and were like "SAnta is not real peoples Mom and Dad's buy the gifts and pretend that they are from Santa" we would probably temper that message with a reminder to be respectful of other peoples beliefs almost like one would with religion.

To me its a little like the sex thing, or religious things. I mean, would be mad if your kid came home at 4(or Dirol and told them that someone "spilled the beans" on the act of sex to your kid? Would the same argument "They have to learn sometime" hold weight in such a circumstance?

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I was reading somewhere else a discussion about what to do if you do not do Santa in your house. I was a little surprised about the responses so I was wondering what you all thought.

If you do not teach Santa in your home, is it your responsibility to teach your children as young as 4 to tell other children that there is a Santa? If your child spills the beans about Santa, does the other child's parents have the right to be mad at you and your child?

ETA - for the purpose of this I am thinking of a child around 4 who might not really understand Santa.

Our children have always known dh and I were "Santa". We use Jesus' birth as the real meaning of Christmas but still talk about Santa as just for fun and make believe and also explain that he is based on St. Nicholas. And yes, we do explain to our children that it is not their job to tell other children Santa isn't real and that that is their mommy and daddy's job when they decide to do that. And that's OK to pretend/etc. when the teacher asks them to write a letter to Santa at school (vs making a big scene Wink the alternative is to quietly ask the teacher if they can write it to mommy/daddy instead).

Now... kids being kids I know there is a chance that despite our reminders every year they shouldn't tell, that my child will say something. If I find out about it and/or if another child's parent gets upset at me/my kids that's their prerogative I guess... I'll remind my child again but I am not going to punish or scold them for it because they told the truth.

"Potter75" wrote:

To me its a little like the sex thing, or religious things. I mean, would be mad if your kid came home at 4(or 8 ) and told them that someone "spilled the beans" on the act of sex to your kid? Would the same argument "They have to learn sometime" hold weight in such a circumstance?

I'm sorry but that isn't even CLOSE to the same thing. BTDT. We have had to have a number of too-early-discussions with my dd over the years because of things other kids have said to her/she has overheard... most of which required reporting to the school (not because I was upset, though I was,... but based on the content). So as far as I am concerned that's not even on the same playing field as spilling the beans about Santa and there's no way I can even try to compare the two.

Slightly OT and out of curiousity... at what age to most kids who are told Santa's real find out/realize he's not? I'm curious because I was surprised that there are some (not sure how many, but a few for sure) grade 6 kids (so age 11-12) at our school who still truly believe he's real. I would've expected it to be figured out quite a bit before that :dontknow:

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Why? Sex is real and so is the notion that ones parents gift children, not Santa. Both is information that parents generally try to control their childrens knowledge of.

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"Potter75" wrote:

Why? Sex is real and so is the notion that ones parents gift children, not Santa. Both is information that parents generally try to control their childrens knowledge of.

Not disagreeing with the bolded, however, they are two completely different things on completely opposite ends of the spectrum and I would hazard a guess that most parents, given a choice, would rather their child learn about Santa vs specific details about an adult act at such a young age.

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We don't do Santa at all, but we do gently remind our kids each year around Christmas to not say anything if some of their friends do believe in Santa.

I am surprised at the number of 9, 10, 11 year olds I hear about who still believe in Santa.

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"kris_w" wrote:

We don't do Santa at all, but we do gently remind our kids each year around Christmas to not say anything if some of their friends do believe in Santa.

This is what we do. We do not teach Santa, but have told the girls this is our secret on not to tell their friends about Santa. That said, I do not understand an adult being upset with a 4 year old for saying they don't know what you mean when you ask what they are getting from Santa.

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

This is what we do. We do not teach Santa, but have told the girls this is our secret on not to tell their friends about Santa. That said, I do not understand an adult being upset with a 4 year old for saying they don't know what you mean when you ask what they are getting from Santa.

Ditto.

And I could never understand why someone (*coughMILcough*) who KNOWS we don't do Santa would ask the kids "so what did Santa bring you?" :rolleyes: But then again, she chewed dh out way back when the kids were younger and he explained to her that we weren't teaching Santa as real and got really nasty that they'd better not ruin it for the other (grand)kids!!! (The SILs/BILs never had any issue with us not teaching it so why should she? Besides, it's our business/right to teach our children how we choose, no?)

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"Potter75" wrote:

I do think that there is a certain degree of social responsibility that comes with not doing Santa at all, as the Santa myth is such a widespread and cultural norm in America. If we totally didn't do it at all and were like "SAnta is not real peoples Mom and Dad's buy the gifts and pretend that they are from Santa" we would probably temper that message with a reminder to be respectful of other peoples beliefs almost like one would with religion.

To me its a little like the sex thing, or religious things. I mean, would be mad if your kid came home at 4(or Dirol and told them that someone "spilled the beans" on the act of sex to your kid? Would the same argument "They have to learn sometime" hold weight in such a circumstance?

I entirely agree with this.

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"Princess&ThePea" wrote:

Not disagreeing with the bolded, however, they are two completely different things on completely opposite ends of the spectrum and I would hazard a guess that most parents, given a choice, would rather their child learn about Santa vs specific details about an adult act at such a young age.

Well, okay, but what on earth does that have to do with anything? Can you envision a scenario in which a parent had to make that choice? I can't. My point is if that it is legitimate to not want other children to talk to your children about certain (fact based) scenarios, it is equally fair for Santa doing parents to not want children who are told that Santa is fake from a young age to tell their children that.

Honestly this was a mitigating factor in our decision to "do" Santa at all or not. Didn't want to have that kid who ruins it for others, and didn't want to have to explain to my kids why I wanted them to lie to other kids. I guess you could say we took cultural peer pressure into account.

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If you do not teach Santa in your home, is it your responsibility to teach your children as young as 4 to tell other children that there is a Santa? No, I believe it's the parents' responsibility to decide whether or not they want to pretend there's a Santa with their own children.

If your child spills the beans about Santa, does the other child's parents have the right to be mad at you and your child? Na, I don't think so. Parents can easily override what a child says to their peers.

I've explained to my DD that other parents do pretend there's a Santa, and that she shouldn't say anything to other kids about it.

What I don't get is how unbending a lot of adults are about the whole Santa story, especially the older generation. It seems they don't even consider that some parents might not do Santa in their home. I can't tell you how many adults, especially the elderly, have asked my DD what she wants Santa to bring her. Then today I had a lady tell my DD, "You'd better be good, or Santa won't bring you any presents!" See that right there is one of the big reasons we don't do Santa. I do not want my DD thinking that her Christmas gifts are based on how "good" she is.

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"Potter75" wrote:

and didn't want to have to explain to my kids why I wanted them to lie to other kids.

This is the sticking point for me. I will not lie to my children, nor do I expect them to lie to their friends. I will tell them not to tell others about Santa, but would not expect them to lie if outright asked. I am sorry if someone finds out, but will not punish my child for not lying to someone.

As for teaching about sex, I do not know of many 4 year olds telling other 4 year olds about sex. (At least I hope not)

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Uh, it isn't the age it is the premise. Pick whatever age you want. It's an analogy.

I think that parents have every right to feel put out were your children telling their young children that Santa is not real.

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I am not thinking of an older child telling a younger child, but two young children. I do not think it should be put on a 4 yo to understand not to tell that Santa does not come to their house. I can try to teach that, but they just might not understand.

(As far as I know, my children have not told anyone who did not already know about Santa)

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I'm gonna be pretty pissy when some rotten kid lets my child in on the truth that there is no Santa and steals some of the magic of Christmas away. I take great joy in the whole Santa charade and I'd be delighted if my kids were still believers at 11 or 12 (though it seems some of you are horrified at that thought). In fact, we're going to visit Santa tonight so I can get the annual ridiculously expensive picture with him because it is a wonderful tradition that I have no desire to let go of any time soon. Kids grow up entirely too fast. Let me have a few more years with the whole Santa thing!

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"Alana*sMommy" wrote:

I'd be delighted if my kids were still believers at 11 or 12 (though it seems some of you are horrified at that thought).

I'm not horrified. Just was surprised.

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"Alana*sMommy" wrote:

I'm gonna be pretty pissy when some rotten kid lets my child in on the truth that there is no Santa and steals some of the magic of Christmas away. I take great joy in the whole Santa charade and I'd be delighted if my kids were still believers at 11 or 12 (though it seems some of you are horrified at that thought). In fact, we're going to visit Santa tonight so I can get the annual ridiculously expensive picture with him because it is a wonderful tradition that I have no desire to let go of any time soon. Kids grow up entirely too fast. Let me have a few more years with the whole Santa thing!

Agreed. I don't think it's lying to my child to tell her about Santa. I find it a magical part of Christmas that I grew up around and want to share with my children as well. When she figures it out, I'll make sure she's respectful to other children and their beliefs.

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Just out of curiosity, for those who are 100% anti lying to their children yet also don't want other kids telling your kids about sex, when your kids asked you how the baby got in your tummy (or other peoples tummies), I assume you tell them the truth, right?

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I can only say what our family does, but yes when DD1 Diablo asked questions we answer 100% honestly. We did not give her more information than she asked for, but answered her questions with truthful answers.

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My oldest son will be 12 in two weeks. He firmly believes in Santa and feels sorry for the kids who don't believe or who's parents don't believe. We believe in the magic of Christmas and the selfless giving that the idea of Santa embodies. We explain that when babies are little parents tell Santa what they want their family tradition to be and some "opt" out of it. Others decide on amount of presents and other details. That is why every family is different. And that the people at the mall are just "helpers"

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When I was in elementary I told some kid there was no Santa. He didn't believe me (or atkeast sad he didn't). I have also been told Jesus is my savior quit a bit and I didn't believe them. Kids hear stuff all the time and as a parent I can't imagine being upset by it because kids talk. I would think if you do the Santa thing knowing very well there is no santa, you have back-up plans when your kid comes and asks "is Sanat real?" "How can he be at every mall?" "How does he get around to every house?". So Why would "Jimmy at school told me there was no Santa. Is that true?" be any different?

I don't purposely teach my kids to keep up the lie for other people because they have some sort of social obligation. I just teach them to be kind and respectful about other people's beliefs and they know different people think differnt things. It's why they don't go around telling everyone who wears a cross that Jesus is not their Savior. However if they get into a discussion at school they have every right to say what they feel they need to.

Going back to my having "spilled the beans"about Santa to a kid in school. Does it change things had I told you he found out I was Jewish and didn't celebrate Christmas and started badgering me that Santa just doesn't like me and that'swhy he doesn't come to my house? I remember being very pleased to tell him that there was no Santa.

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I can only say what our family does, but yes when DD1 Diablo asked questions we answer 100% honestly. We did not give her more information than she asked for, but answered her questions with truthful answers.

Ditto to all of this. We have always given age-appropriate, honest answers. Occasionally there has been a question that is just too big for them to handle at a young age and in that case I have told them that is something I will explain to them when they are older but for now that is not something they should/need to know at [whatever age]. There have also been things we have had to explain far earlier than necessary due to what my dd has been told/asked to do/etc :confused: But no, we do not lie to them about it.

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"indigoV51" wrote:

My oldest son will be 12 in two weeks. He firmly believes in Santa and feels sorry for the kids who don't believe or who's parents don't believe. We believe in the magic of Christmas and the selfless giving that the idea of Santa embodies. We explain that when babies are little parents tell Santa what they want their family tradition to be and some "opt" out of it. Others decide on amount of presents and other details. That is why every family is different. And that the people at the mall are just "helpers"

Just make sure he isn't the one to tell the Jewish kid he feels sorry for them they don't believe in Santa or I promise you, they will spill the beans. Smile

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I understand not doing the Santa thing but I don't get the "I don't lie to my kids ever" thing. So do you tell your kids how every magic trick works because for them to believe it is magic is a lie?

BTw I lie to my kids all the time, especially when they were younger. "I have eyes int he back of my head", "I am always right.", "We have to leave the toy store because they are closing.", "You are the smartest kind in the whole world.", "Uncle Joe is up in heaven and looking down on you right now smiling."

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"culturedmom" wrote:

I understand not doing the Santa thing but I don't get the "I don't lie to my kids ever" thing. So do you tell your kids how every magic trick works because for them to believe it is magic is a lie?

No... because I don't know how every magic trick works Wink But if they ask me how X trick is done, I can say I don't know and that it is an illusion but they way they do it looks like magic. Sometimes kids are on a "need to know" basis too and don't need to know everything. But if they ask me a question, I'm supposed to totally lie to them about it?

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I just don't believe people who say that they never ever lie. Like, I think that saying things like "Using age appropriate language" means "I lied either overtly or via a lie of omission".

I have 100% convinced my kids that I was a ninja before I met and married their father. I just don't take this whole "be 100% honest never lie to kids who still poop in their own diaper or can't make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich" thing too seriously at times Smile

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I had the myth of Santa figured out at a really young age. Nobody told me he wasn't real; I guess I was able to reason that there was no way a man with the help of elves could make toys for all the kids and fly all over the world in one night. However, even though my mom had resigned herself to the fact that her 6 yo knew Santa wasn't real it was absolutely forbidden for me to spill it to my little brother. No way, no how. And if I did, bye bye Christmas presents for forever. The threat was effective ;).

Guilty of lying to my kids. Part of the 'magic' of Santa is lying about it, plain and simple. If we want our kids to start believing in Santa in the first place we have to instigate the lying, right? When my children are of the age that they no longer believe, we'll need to talk about keeping that a secret from the other kids who still believe. I wouldn't want them to ruin the excitement for other children.

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"Potter75" wrote:

I just don't believe people who say that they never ever lie. Like, I think that saying things like "Using age appropriate language" means "I lied either overtly or via a lie of omission".

I have 100% convinced my kids that I was a ninja before I met and married their father. I just don't take this whole "be 100% honest never lie to kids who still poop in their own diaper or can't make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich" thing too seriously at times Smile

Agreed....

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I would never say that I was perfect because I am not. I will say that I do not believe in lying to my children or anyone else. I need my children to trust me. If there is something they want to know that I am not ready to tell them, I tell them that. "Sorry, Mommy is not going to talk about that right now."

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Like others, I would hope that the non-believing kids would be respectful. But two of my kids ride a school bus to school every day....and this conversation has come up. We just say that if you don't believe, Santa doesn't come. They still "believe". It was the strategy my parents employed and Santa still brings me gifts (yes, my hubby or my parents put them out....but it is fun and magical....) I'll keep that up forever. Especially as our children will have a nearly 9 year age gap. Santa will be a staple at our house and I'll expect our big kids to contribute to the magic for their siblings and other kids. I think that is part of teaching respect.

Our kids know the truth about babies and where they come from and how they are made. Not graphically, but the nuts and bolts. I was pulled aside at preschool a few years ago bc my daughter shared where babies came out of (she had just watched the birth of her sister.....) and was "correcting" a friend who said babies come out of belly buttons. I apologized to the teacher and to the other mother, and had a conversation about c-sections with my nearly 4 year old. But I don't regret that my kids know where babies come out of and how that process happens (but that is kind of a "thing" of mine that I hate how our culture makes everyone scared of birthing from an early age....)

But I lie to my kids about other things all.of.the.time. And I don't think twice about it 99% of the time.

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

This is the sticking point for me. I will not lie to my children, nor do I expect them to lie to their friends. I will tell them not to tell others about Santa, but would not expect them to lie if outright asked. I am sorry if someone finds out, but will not punish my child for not lying to someone.

As for teaching about sex, I do not know of many 4 year olds telling other 4 year olds about sex. (At least I hope not)

We just encountered this issue this weekend. J (3) gave DH a kiss and announced that was sex. ?!!??!?!?! She explained that she was told by a friend (3) at daycare that when a person loves someone they have sex. We know the parents of the other girl and are guessing that she accidentally walked in on her parents and needed a bit of explaining.

**************************************

We also follow the magic of Christmas. My older kids believed through their entire elementary years and never admitted when they stopped. When they started repeating back what some of their friends were saying about Santa being fake, I'd always throw it back at them and ask them what they thought and simply stated that Santa exists for those who believe. The movie, 'Polar Express', is great at reiterating that concept. We even have bells on their stockings that they listen to.

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I would be mad at my kid for the Santa thing, assuming he was just doing it to be a brat. If he was 4, I would think he might not really be old enough to understand why telling other kids that there is no Santa is a mean thing to do so I don't know that I would blame him for it. My 3.5 year old just totally blew a secret that I asked him to keep (re: DH's present) but I can't really blame him because he doesn't really *get it* yet. I assume that he won't be *that* much brighter about keeping secrets in 6 months. But assuming that he was older and just trying to be nasty to some kid by blowing the lid off, I wouldn't be too keen on it. I think it's important to teach my kid to be respectful and kind of other people's beliefs. If the whole "there is no Santa" thing has the potential to get ugly, imagine the whole "there is no God" scenario!

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Alissa, I was thinking that Smile Instead of a "Santa is fake" I'm imagining a "Christmas is ripped off from a million other religions" spiller to a young kid.

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"Alissa_Sal" wrote:

I would be mad at my kid for the Santa thing, assuming he was just doing it to be a brat. If he was 4, I would think he might not really be old enough to understand why telling other kids that there is no Santa is a mean thing to do so I don't know that I would blame him for it. My 3.5 year old just totally blew a secret that I asked him to keep (re: DH's present) but I can't really blame him because he doesn't really *get it* yet. I assume that he won't be *that* much brighter about keeping secrets in 6 months. But assuming that he was older and just trying to be nasty to some kid by blowing the lid off, I wouldn't be too keen on it. I think it's important to teach my kid to be respectful and kind of other people's beliefs. If the whole "there is no Santa" thing has the potential to get ugly, imagine the whole "there is no God" scenario!

See now I can understand a 10 year old telling a 4 year old about Santa as being mean, but not another 4 year old who would not understand not to.

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Haha, the local PTA would storm my house with torches and pitchforks. In all honesty, that is why I am and will continue to be sooooo careful about what I say about the whole religion issue. He is (and will be for a very long time) waaaaay too young to have any sort of filter or understand that you can disagree with someone about something important like religion and still respect their POV and all of that. I really watch my mouth and how I put things when he asks me questions (which have already started.) I don't even dispute the Santa claims at this point, I just smile and say "That's what they say...."

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

See now I can understand a 10 year old telling a 4 year old about Santa as being mean, but not another 4 year old who would not understand not to.

Well, those are two completely different scenarios in my mind. I don't think that anyone's parents should be too mad at your 4 year old (who doesn't really have the ability to understand why she shouldn't say "there is no Santa".) In that case, I hope that the parents would shrug it off as "oh well, we all have different beliefs and there is nothing we can really do to prevent that." But if your kid was 10 and telling a 4 year old that there is no Santa, that's a whole other ball of wax. I would be seriously PO'ed at my kid if he did that, and I wouldn't blame the parents for being put out either. It's just a mean thing to do!

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We do Santa, but not in the way most other families do. Santa comes to us on the Winter Solstice, and he only fills the stockings. We've never really presented Santa as a real magical person; he's the spirit of selfless giving that fills our hearts & makes us want to do good things to other people with no expectation of anything in return.

We are a non-religion, non-meat-eating, extended nursing, co-sleeping family so there's plenty of opportunity to teach our kids that all families are different, and different is good. The world would be a very boring place if we were all exactly the same, and we have to respect what their family believes. So we do things our way, other families do things their way, and neither way is better or worse, just different. If some kid believes that Santa comes on the first night of Hannukah & leaves a ready-to-ride bike, that's great, and if another kid believes that Santa doesn't exist, that's also great, and I *hope* that we've ingrained that in our kids. I think we have. Just this morning, I brought a little bike, that we've decided Weston doesn't need anymore, to work for a friend's little boy, and Weston picked up a big stuffed penguin and said, "I be Santa, Jason needs a penguin, too!" Blum 3

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"Alissa_Sal" wrote:

Well, those are two completely different scenarios in my mind. I don't think that anyone's parents should be too mad at your 4 year old (who doesn't really have the ability to understand why she shouldn't say "there is no Santa".) In that case, I hope that the parents would shrug it off as "oh well, we all have different beliefs and there is nothing we can really do to prevent that." But if your kid was 10 and telling a 4 year old that there is no Santa, that's a whole other ball of wax. I would be seriously PO'ed at my kid if he did that, and I wouldn't blame the parents for being put out either. It's just a mean thing to do!

That is the thing. I was so surprised that anyone would be mad at a 4 year old for something like that. In my opinion an older child or adult saying something is completely different.

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

That is the thing. I was so surprised that anyone would be mad at a 4 year old for something like that. In my opinion an older child or adult saying something is completely different.

Did that actually happen?

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That was the whole thing that the other forum was talking about. I also have a friend that has made it very clear she would be angry if one of my girls said anything, but especially DD2 (4), I can tell her not to say anything, but I can not promise she won't.

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I've been thinking and I really don't think we lie to our kids... I mean we joke and say silly things ("Where are you going?" "To the moon" and that sort of thing, but the kids know we are joking because we are really obviously silly about it and if they do actually believe me, I fess up right away and tell them I was being silly.

As for babies, funny story. DS1 and DD2 had just turned 3 and 2 when their brother was born. They asked how the baby would come out and I explained it was from a spot near your bum - no problem. Thankfully they never asked how the baby got made. Then a few months after DS2 was born, my oldest was looking at my stretch marks (lovely) and said, "Mom, I know babies come out your by your bum, but how do they get in there?" Dang. I was hoping to avoid that question for a while. I went with a safe answer, "God makes the baby" (not a lie, I do believe that). My son responsed, "Mommy, I know that. I mean how do they get in there???" While I was thinking about how best to approach a sex talk with my barely 3 year old, he interrupts and says, "Well, since they come out by your bum, I guess they go in by your bum... But, when they are way smaller." And off he went. Phew!

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Ok. Maybe we did lie last New Years.

The big kids (who were 5, 4, and 2) wanted to stay up until midnight. We changed the clocks ahead, played board games, ate special treats and drank sparkling apple juice, then watched the ball drop in NY (we are on Pacific Time), shouted Happy New Year, hugged and kissed, and sent them to bed a couple hours later than normal.

And it bit us in the a$$. They want to do it again this year but two of them can tell time.

Suggestions anyone???

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"kris_w" wrote:

Ok. Maybe we did lie last New Years.

The big kids (who were 5, 4, and 2) wanted to stay up until midnight. We changed the clocks ahead, played board games, ate special treats and drank sparkling apple juice, then watched the ball drop in NY (we are on Pacific Time), shouted Happy New Year, hugged and kissed, and sent them to bed a couple hours later than normal.

And it bit us in the a$$. They want to do it again this year but two of them can tell time.

Suggestions anyone???

I think you should explain what happened last year and tell them that's the latest you'll allow, but that you can do all that same fun stuff you did and watch the ball and stuff.

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"culturedmom" wrote:

Just make sure he isn't the one to tell the Jewish kid he feels sorry for them they don't believe in Santa or I promise you, they will spill the beans. Smile

Actually my kid thinks that the Jewish kids are lucky since they get 8 presents and he only gets five lol! We actually read "Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins" every year during Hanukkah. It is our favorite book!

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"kris_w" wrote:

We don't do Santa at all, but we do gently remind our kids each year around Christmas to not say anything if some of their friends do believe in Santa.

I am surprised at the number of 9, 10, 11 year olds I hear about who still believe in Santa.

Really? I believed at 10 until my dad broke my heart and told me otherwise. I still like to believe in Santa as an adult, though. Something magical about holding innocent thoughts for once.

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"indigoV51" wrote:

Actually my kid thinks that the Jewish kids are lucky since they get 8 presents and he only gets five lol! We actually read "Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins" every year during Hanukkah. It is our favorite book!

And my oldest had it out with mall Santa last year because she was concerned about the Jewish kids and wanted to make sure he brought them presents too, lol.

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"Potter75" wrote:

I just don't believe people who say that they never ever lie. Like, I think that saying things like "Using age appropriate language" means "I lied either overtly or via a lie of omission".

I have 100% convinced my kids that I was a ninja before I met and married their father. I just don't take this whole "be 100% honest never lie to kids who still poop in their own diaper or can't make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich" thing too seriously at times Smile

Yeah, when people say they never lie to their kids, it makes me think they are trying to be a sanctimommy holier than thou kind of parent. I love telling little lies to my kid. I love when he searches for eyes on the back of my head, or thinks I really pulled a quarter out of his ear.

To answer the OP, kids will blurt out everything but luckily my kid believes me over his friends at school, lol. I would not be mad if a kid said there is no Santa to Jace, I would just tell him there is a Santa and he'll see xmas morning when there are presents that mysteriously appeared Smile

I try to be respectful of everyone's beliefs, and that includes the non believers Wink

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"indigoV51" wrote:

Actually my kid thinks that the Jewish kids are lucky since they get 8 presents and he only gets five lol!

LOL I guess my ds was learning about Hannukah at school last week... he came home trying to tell me all about how some people light candles and celebrate Christmas for EIGHT DAYS!

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"kris_w" wrote:

Ok. Maybe we did lie last New Years.

The big kids (who were 5, 4, and 2) wanted to stay up until midnight. We changed the clocks ahead, played board games, ate special treats and drank sparkling apple juice, then watched the ball drop in NY (we are on Pacific Time), shouted Happy New Year, hugged and kissed, and sent them to bed a couple hours later than normal.

And it bit us in the a$$. They want to do it again this year but two of them can tell time.

Suggestions anyone???

Can you find a video clip or two or three from a past NYE celebration, change all your clocks and then play the video a couple hours ahead of time to make them think that it's live? You'd have to keep the TV off (or at least the digital guide) so they don't get the real time from the guide, but that's all I can think of!

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