School dress code.....with a twist.

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School dress code.....with a twist.

Because it applies to parents!

School Gives Dress Code to Parents Who Wear PJs for Drop-Off

Most school dress codes are the same -- nothing overtly revealing, no gang symbols, and some even have uniforms. All these dress codes have one goal in common: to avoid distraction or allow anything harmful to interfere with our kids' day.

But what if your child's school decided their dress code applied to parents, too? That you couldn't set foot at their school -- even just to stand outside your car waiting to pick your child up -- if you were wearing a tank top or pajama pants? Worse, what if they claimed they'd make your child find an alternate way home if you chose to wear something that didn't fit 'the code'?

This is the reality for one school.

The mom says the topic came up when she and a friend were discussing moms wearing pajama pants, and her friend showed her the handbook that says:

We respectfully request that parents who drop off their children and pick them up from school follow all of the dress code expectations that students are expected to follow including the rule stating that pajamas are not to be worn.

Whether you get all sparkled up in the morning or not, that's not the issue. I put on jeans to run to the store, but they're not comfortable so my yoga pants are back on as soon as I'm home. I am not, however, going to get fully dressed to drive to my son's school, where I may not even get out of the car, except maybe to help him untwist the seatbelt before we drive away. Call me lazy. I work from home; I get the luxury of being comfortable and not make extra laundry for myself by getting dressed to be outside my car for three seconds. And in the morning? Forget it. It's enough work getting my son up and ready for school on time, while keeping my daughter out of trouble.

But I digress ... the school's handbook apparently further states:

If a parent does not follow the dress code guidelines, we will request that the child find another means of transportation to school.

"Just pull on some jeans, you slob!" isn't the answer. This is a public school, by the way. It's one thing to require a dress code for kids, but for parents? Yeah, not so much. Kids follow the rules because they attend that school and go inside all day. My jammie pants won't interfere with learning, I promise. Maybe if I were in a lacy nightie, sure! I promise if I showed up in protest wearing my Homer Simpson zombie pants, fuzzy bunny slippers and a tank top, I'd likely have less negative effect than the parents who constantly talk on their phones, cuss, or smoke next to their car with their kids around. There's a hell of a lot things worse than parents in PJs at school pick-up lines. Rock on, jammied moms.

Do you think parents should have to adhere to the dress code set for children?

What do you think? Overstepping their bounds? THANK GOD, people who wear PJ's in public are weird? Who cares? Good idea or bad idea on part of this school?

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
Posts: 1533

I dont see that they have leg to stand on as far as enforcing this.

I dont like the idea at all anyways. Dress codes at school help foster a learning environment that is conducive to learning. Some kids mom that is wearing her sponge bob lounge pants in probably not going to be helping in the classroom at that time anyways so she will not be a distraction. I think asking parents to abide by the dress code if they are helping in the classroom is a great idea, but not just for pickup or drop off.

I teach at a private school where the parents have to come in and sign their child in and out, I think the closest I have ever seen to pajamas are workout gear on the moms that are heading out to the gym that is right across the street from the school.

Joined: 01/18/06
Posts: 1626

Ditto Lisa.

I'm most definitely going to be the mom who drops off and possibly picks up in my lounge pants. They're comfy. And my school is literally a block away. I can throw a rock at it. I'd be gunning against that rule for sure. It's none of the school's business what I wear.

FLSunshineMom's picture
Joined: 06/07/06
Posts: 3859

My first question is: As a public school, are they allowed to make whatever dress code policy they want for that school? If so, then I suppose the parents have to abide by it. However, they can protest it to try and get the policy changed.

Also, can it only be enforced if the parent actually gets out of the vehicle? Or do they have to walk inside the school? Or does it apply if they simply come onto the property, whether they're inside a vehicle or not?

It seems silly to me to try and enforce it for the ones who are just dropping off at the door. I would think it would only apply if they were entering the school. Not that I personally would wear pj's while taking my kid to school, but that's just me. I wouldn't even wear pj's to take my niece down to the bus stop when I was taking care of my brother's kids for several days while they were out of town. And I had to get my then one-year-old niece bundled up to take her down there with me, too (it was during the winter). I felt I needed to look at least halfway presentable, since her (my older niece)'s friends would see me standing there with her when she got on the bus. I didn't want to embarrass her.

Joined: 03/14/09
Posts: 624

I don't think that parents should be dropping kids off except in very special circumstances (doctor's appointments) but if they do, it should not matter what they wear.

ftmom's picture
Joined: 09/04/06
Posts: 1538

"blather" wrote:

I don't think that parents should be dropping kids off except in very special circumstances (doctor's appointments) but if they do, it should not matter what they wear.

This confuses me. Could you please elaborate? Do you not think they should not walk/drive their kids to school at all? In our district, for a long time they had open enrollment, so you could enroll your child in any school as long as you could get them there and pick them up. The district wont pay for busing. This ended 2 years ago, but you can still tell the good schools by the lineup of cars out front for drop off and pick up. They also never close the schools here, so they still have classes when it is -50. I would not let my children walk even a few blocks in that.

Now, if you are saying that students should walk to their local school when the weather is appropriate, I would have to agree. However, I will still be walking with my kids until they are at least grade 2 or 3, so therefore dropping them off. I do think the epidemic of parents driving their kids a few blocks every morning is a little silly though.

To the OP, it does not seem like this school IS enforcing the rule as the woman who wrote it was standing in front of the school talking about the parents who pick up in their PJs and then they had to look up the rule in the handbook. They never actually saw or heard of it being enforced.

I would personally never wear it out, but I dont see a problem with pajama pants and a tank top, however, those are not the only pajamas out there. Who knows, maybe this school had a problem a few years ago with a mother picking up a kindy (at the door pickup) in very skimpy clothing and pajamas and decided to get a rule on the books to prevent it in the future. I dont have a problem with the rule as long as they arent being stupid about enforcement.

Joined: 01/18/06
Posts: 1626

"blather" wrote:

I don't think that parents should be dropping kids off except in very special circumstances (doctor's appointments) but if they do, it should not matter what they wear.

at all???

FLSunshineMom's picture
Joined: 06/07/06
Posts: 3859

"blather" wrote:

I don't think that parents should be dropping kids off except in very special circumstances (doctor's appointments) but if they do, it should not matter what they wear.

I'm not sure I understand this. Please clarify. Do you mean they shouldn't drop them off at the classroom? Or at the door? Why would you have a problem with them being dropped off?

culturedmom's picture
Joined: 09/30/06
Posts: 1131

hahahaha, and away we go. Blather you pot stirrer, lol. Wink

I think they are fine havign this in the dress code. It allows them to use such a policy if a parent is very inappropriate in their dress. All the article states is that it is in the code, not that the school actually enforces it. I'm sure when you parent dropping their kid off in a bikini top or short shorts with a bra top (and it has been done, ask my mother the school officer) you wuld be glad their was a policy in place for the school to handle such a situation. I have a hard time thinking that the school has made parents leave because they were in yoga pants. Again another instance of parents being PITAs at school.

Joined: 01/18/06
Posts: 1626

If they don't want bikini tops or short shorts, they should list those instead of pants that cover the whole leg. It's fabric discrimination.

fuchsiasky's picture
Joined: 11/16/07
Posts: 955

I could see it for parents who are actually entering the school, but not for pickups and drop offs. I would just drop off across the street or down the block a little.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"blather" wrote:

I don't think that parents should be dropping kids off except in very special circumstances (doctor's appointments) but if they do, it should not matter what they wear.

My kids preschool does not offer bussing, I don't know how I would get them to school without dropping them off? I'd rather cut off my left breast than homeschool them.

I wear gym clothes most days as I have just enough time in the 2.5 hours to workout. I doubt that my short shorts would make dress code. Luckily ours is drop off ~ so I don't have to get out of the car, but this rule seems a little strange me.

That said, my kids preschool is directly next to a large University ~ driving past some kids in slippers and cotton pajama pants makes me think that they are all dorks.

Rivergallery's picture
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

cut off your breast... seriously.. dramatic much?

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"Rivergallery" wrote:

cut off your breast... seriously.. dramatic much?

No. Just honest.

Joined: 04/12/03
Posts: 1683

"FLSunshineMom" wrote:

My first question is: As a public school, are they allowed to make whatever dress code policy they want for that school? If so, then I suppose the parents have to abide by it. However, they can protest it to try and get the policy changed.

Actually, no. There has to be a reason such as safety, distraction, or advertising illegal activities.

Also, can it only be enforced if the parent actually gets out of the vehicle? Or do they have to walk inside the school? Or does it apply if they simply come onto the property, whether they're inside a vehicle or not?

They're not going to be able to enforce it at all. What is going to happen when a 1st grader is stuck in the office because Mom is sick and they won't release her child?

Furthermore, I don't follow the dress code for students. Students can't wear high heels, yet I can where them to my job. I drop my kids off on my way to/from work. Other parents work for Budweiser or the hospital. Students couldn't advertise beer nor wear scrubs to school. Students can't have visible tattoos, ear stretchers, or make-up. All of which are acceptable for an adult to chose to have.

It seems silly to me to try and enforce it for the ones who are just dropping off at the door. I would think it would only apply if they were entering the school. Not that I personally would wear pj's while taking my kid to school, but that's just me. I wouldn't even wear pj's to take my niece down to the bus stop when I was taking care of my brother's kids for several days while they were out of town. And I had to get my then one-year-old niece bundled up to take her down there with me, too (it was during the winter). I felt I needed to look at least halfway presentable, since her (my older niece)'s friends would see me standing there with her when she got on the bus. I didn't want to embarrass her.

I wonder what the socio-economic status of the school/district is. No way it would fly in our district.

mommytoMR.FACE's picture
Joined: 04/10/09
Posts: 780

"Potter75" wrote:

No. Just honest.

I giggled:)

To answer the OP, unless it's sexual attire/pajamas, banning pajamas in general is silly. Plaid pajama pants and a tshirt is not a big deal and I don't see why a school would even waste their time even thinking about it.

Lucky for me, I'm dressed in my work clothes when I drop Jace off at pre-k, but I'd much rather be in pajamas and go back home and sleep:D

Rivergallery's picture
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

"Potter75" wrote:

No. Just honest.

Well glad I don't feel the same in reverse, it is the same inflated ideas that cause people to say they will move if XYZ becomes president. Or will kill themselves if XYZ happens. It makes your point of view seem less valid.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"Rivergallery" wrote:

Well glad I don't feel the same in reverse, it is the same inflated ideas that cause people to say they will move if XYZ becomes president. Or will kill themselves if XYZ happens. It makes your point of view seem less valid.

You mean you are glad that you would not rather cut off your right breast than send your children to school? Cool! Why on earth would that feeling of yours bother me in the least?

What exactly do you assume my point to be?

Perhaps your assumption regarding my "point" is incorrect to the point as to make your opinion invalid. I mean, clearly you are a super duper intelligent person, verbally gifted, and a wonderful candidate for a homeschool teacher.

I, on the other hand am impatient, I don't have any experience or education in teaching, I don't have an advanced degree (which I would want to have in order to educate my children) I have a lot of personal goals to accomplish outside of schooling my children, and I don't think that I have the personality to deal gracefully with schooling 3 children 3 years apart. Hence my statement.

If you read my posts re: homeschooling I have always been supportive of those who are smart and creative and patient enough to do it ~ even to the point of saying if I had a child who had some sort of special circumstance or need, I would be open to it. I've also said that I wish I had been home schooled as a teenager.

So maybe you should just save the assumptions. I would rather lose a breast than homeschool MY children without a direct need to do so. That statement has ZERO bearing on your choices.

So rather than take my feelings on my own children and my own temperment as a reflection of your decision or of homeschooling in general, maybe you should ask for clarification before declaring my situation or feelings "invalid". As a teacher, you should know to ask for clarification before rushing to judgment, I would think.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3183

"culturedmom" wrote:

hahahaha, and away we go. Blather you pot stirrer, lol. Wink

I think they are fine havign this in the dress code. It allows them to use such a policy if a parent is very inappropriate in their dress. All the article states is that it is in the code, not that the school actually enforces it. I'm sure when you parent dropping their kid off in a bikini top or short shorts with a bra top (and it has been done, ask my mother the school officer) you wuld be glad their was a policy in place for the school to handle such a situation. I have a hard time thinking that the school has made parents leave because they were in yoga pants. Again another instance of parents being PITAs at school.

I think this is the general idea of it...they just want a way to address a situation that might come up. Obviously they can't enforce it.

I still think it's silly and somewhat insulting.

And how are you supposed to get your kids to school without dropping them off? That was a funny one!

And for the record, I don't think people should wear their pajamas out in public or to drop their kids off. Stacy & Clinton would agree. Smile Workout clothes are fine if you're about to exercise or just finishing, you'd wear those in public anyway if you were at a gym, at a class, out running, etc.

But in general, it's not a policy they can enforce, just a guideline they can use if they need to address someone's inappropriate clothing as needed. Maybe someone has been wearing a negligee?

Rivergallery's picture
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

"Potter75" wrote:

You mean you are glad that you would not rather cut off your right breast than send your children to school? Cool! Why on earth would that feeling of yours bother me in the least?

What exactly do you assume my point to be?

Perhaps your assumption regarding my "point" is incorrect to the point as to make your opinion invalid. I mean, clearly you are a super duper intelligent person, verbally gifted, and a wonderful candidate for a homeschool teacher.

I, on the other hand am impatient, I don't have any experience or education in teaching, I don't have an advanced degree (which I would want to have in order to educate my children) I have a lot of personal goals to accomplish outside of schooling my children, and I don't think that I have the personality to deal gracefully with schooling 3 children 3 years apart. Hence my statement.

If you read my posts re: homeschooling I have always been supportive of those who are smart and creative and patient enough to do it ~ even to the point of saying if I had a child who had some sort of special circumstance or need, I would be open to it. I've also said that I wish I had been home schooled as a teenager.

So maybe you should just save the assumptions. I would rather lose a breast than homeschool MY children without a direct need to do so. That statement has ZERO bearing on your choices.

So rather than take my feelings on my own children and my own temperment as a reflection of your decision or of homeschooling in general, maybe you should ask for clarification before declaring my situation or feelings "invalid". As a teacher, you should know to ask for clarification before rushing to judgment, I would think.

The dramatics of the statement itself render it invalid because most sane people would not follow through in cutting off their breast if forced to alter their educational choices... YOU did not say "I would be open to it" nor "you wish you had been homeschooled as a teenager" in this post. I do not keep track of everyone's view points I take each debate pretty much as stand alone. You said you would cut off a body part if you had to do something. I can't think of anything I would cut off a body part for, except to save one of my children's lives.. possibly my own but I am not sure I could do it even to save my own life. I take things much more literal,... and so yes the pure extreme nature of your statement made it invalid for me.... It doesn't mean you would want to homeschool and wouldn't hate it and possibly suck at it.. It means... NO you really wouldn't cut off your breast, so why exaggerate to that extreme?

FLSunshineMom's picture
Joined: 06/07/06
Posts: 3859

The debate board can be such good entertainment sometimes, can't it? And I mean that in the best of ways Smile I giggled at the cutting off of the body part, too.

I'm still waiting on the answer to our question about why dropping off our kids is a bad thing. Smile My DD's school doesn't have bussing, either, so... not much alternative there. (And by the way, for those of you here who might remember that I was homeschooling, well, I had a change of heart. After doing it for awhile, I didn't feel that I was the right person for the job, plus I felt that my DD--as an only sibling with a very outgoing personality--needed the interaction with other kids.)

Back to dropping off our kids. I actually park and walk my DD to her classroom. It's Pre-K, she's 4 1/2, and she still wants me to (with the exception of one day when she did want to be dropped off at the door), so I'm going to enjoy it while I can.:) The school has no problem with it at all, and I'm not the only one who does it.

Rivergallery's picture
Joined: 05/23/03
Posts: 1301

Totally entertaining, one reason I can't stay away... but seriously LOL.. to try and say she is serious about doing it if she had to homeschool.. instead of it being in jest and an exageration is silly.

I have no idea why people shouldn't have some sort of dress code, I mean why did they feel the need to pass it.. were people coming in their underwear?

If my kiddos were grade school I would think nothing of dropping them off, watching them enter the door of the school and leave it at that, especially at 3rd grade, or if other kids /teachers/aides were about.. We have small public schools here though. When I worked as an aide, kidds were dropped off at the front door, some brought into the office area, some not.

Joined: 03/14/09
Posts: 624

"FLSunshineMom" wrote:

I'm still waiting on the answer to our question about why dropping off our kids is a bad thing.

Sorry, I have a life, with a job and kids to take care of and parents visiting. Sorry I didn't answer on your schedule.

I am very passionate about children getting to school on their own. Children close enough to school should walk/bike and if they are too far (and by this I mean farmland) then buses should be provided by the school. If there are countries which are cutting transportation then that is a huge issue in my eyes.

Parents lining up at schools creates dangers for children, creates problems for other users of those roads, makes it dangerous for other pedestrians and bicyclists (ever tried to bike around a school pick-up area? More dangerous than downtown areas). It is a huge waste of natural resources, a burden on parents, and it takes away healthy alternatives from children. There is a lot of talk on this board and in the US about obesity in childhood and this is one of the easiest ways to combat it.

If there was a protest in New York against parents driving their kids to school I would go to it.

Obviously I know that private preschools in the US aren't going to provide busing, but 10 year olds who can't walk 10 blocks to school drive me wacky.

Joined: 01/18/06
Posts: 1626

You mean dropping off by car then. I definitely agree it's out of hand the amount of parents who drop off by car. I hate going by our school during those hours. We walk or ride a bike (kids in the trailer) and it is dangerous! Our school boundaries are such that any child attending is in close enough proximity to walk. Which is what we'll do.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"Rivergallery" wrote:

The dramatics of the statement itself render it invalid because most sane people would not follow through in cutting off their breast if forced to alter their educational choices... YOU did not say "I would be open to it" nor "you wish you had been homeschooled as a teenager" in this post. I do not keep track of everyone's view points I take each debate pretty much as stand alone. You said you would cut off a body part if you had to do something. I can't think of anything I would cut off a body part for, except to save one of my children's lives.. possibly my own but I am not sure I could do it even to save my own life. I take things much more literal,... and so yes the pure extreme nature of your statement made it invalid for me.... It doesn't mean you would want to homeschool and wouldn't hate it and possibly suck at it.. It means... NO you really wouldn't cut off your breast, so why exaggerate to that extreme?

Yes, you do seem to "take things much more literal" than I do. I really have nothing to say. If it was invalid to you, cool. I don't take each debate as "stand alone". I assimilate. If I had to reiterate my stance on every issue every time I posted imagine how very long my posts would be! I forget that everyone isn't able to remember things about other posters/debates like that.

Different strokes, and all.

I'm sure home schooling is working wonderfully for you and your children.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"blather" wrote:

Sorry, I have a life, with a job and kids to take care of and parents visiting. Sorry I didn't answer on your schedule.

I am very passionate about children getting to school on their own. Children close enough to school should walk/bike and if they are too far (and by this I mean farmland) then buses should be provided by the school. If there are countries which are cutting transportation then that is a huge issue in my eyes.

Parents lining up at schools creates dangers for children, creates problems for other users of those roads, makes it dangerous for other pedestrians and bicyclists (ever tried to bike around a school pick-up area? More dangerous than downtown areas). It is a huge waste of natural resources, a burden on parents, and it takes away healthy alternatives from children. There is a lot of talk on this board and in the US about obesity in childhood and this is one of the easiest ways to combat it.

If there was a protest in New York against parents driving their kids to school I would go to it.

Obviously I know that private preschools in the US aren't going to provide busing, but 10 year olds who can't walk 10 blocks to school drive me wacky.

Many of us don't live in areas which have the same population density and public transportation as you do. Outside of that, I agree with you. Unfortunately my kids elementary school is 2.3 miles away, but not on kid friendly biking roads (we don't have "blocks" here in the burbs. They will take the bus. Suburbia is a mixed bag, for sure. I suppose I'd rather have them be fat than dead from an unsafe commute to kindergarten (if walking to school was the only option for exercise, of course) The nice thing about suburbia is that we have lots of open area for outdoor activities to combat that whole obesity thing, the walk to and from school is not our only option for outdoor activity and exercise. Smile

Our little preschool does not present a traffic burden to bikers as we are in a parking lot when we line up for drop off and pick up (again, less population density here).

mommytoMR.FACE's picture
Joined: 04/10/09
Posts: 780

"blather" wrote:

Sorry, I have a life, with a job and kids to take care of and parents visiting. Sorry I didn't answer on your schedule.

I am very passionate about children getting to school on their own. Children close enough to school should walk/bike and if they are too far (and by this I mean farmland) then buses should be provided by the school. If there are countries which are cutting transportation then that is a huge issue in my eyes.

Parents lining up at schools creates dangers for children, creates problems for other users of those roads, makes it dangerous for other pedestrians and bicyclists (ever tried to bike around a school pick-up area? More dangerous than downtown areas). It is a huge waste of natural resources, a burden on parents, and it takes away healthy alternatives from children. There is a lot of talk on this board and in the US about obesity in childhood and this is one of the easiest ways to combat it.

If there was a protest in New York against parents driving their kids to school I would go to it.

Obviously I know that private preschools in the US aren't going to provide busing, but 10 year olds who can't walk 10 blocks to school drive me wacky.

I used to walk to school when I was 5 and 6 years old, by myself Smile I loved it, and I loved the crossing guard and I felt like such a big girl. Funny story: I used to watch Rescue 911 which in turn made me assimilate unmarked white work vans with men that wanted to abduct little children. There was a white work van parked on the side of the road on my street and I ran like the wind and started crying. I honestly thought I was going to be stolen. I think that's when I experienced my first anxiety attack:D

culturedmom's picture
Joined: 09/30/06
Posts: 1131

I'd cut off Melis' right breast if I had to homeschool, too.

Seriously, I agree with Melis. Her point was to express how strongly she feels against homeschooling her children, and I feel just as strongly. That has nothing to do with homeschooling, people who homeschool, or situations apart from what we are dealing with in the present.

At this point in time, to homeschool my children would be the biggest disservice I could do for them. There is not one positive thing that would come from it for any of us. And I have an advanced degree in Education. It would be detrimental for me to take them out of a social environment with other children where they are learning to interact and work in a group and all the other stuff they get from going to public school and keep them home and teach them myself. For my kids, that would be awful. They would hate it, I would hate it, and nothing positive would be gained. So how, on a board where we can only use words would one convey that? I think saying cutting off one's breast is a perfect metaphor to convey the strong feelings we have.

culturedmom's picture
Joined: 09/30/06
Posts: 1131

"blather" wrote:

Sorry, I have a life, with a job and kids to take care of and parents visiting. Sorry I didn't answer on your schedule.

I am very passionate about children getting to school on their own. Children close enough to school should walk/bike and if they are too far (and by this I mean farmland) then buses should be provided by the school. If there are countries which are cutting transportation then that is a huge issue in my eyes.

Parents lining up at schools creates dangers for children, creates problems for other users of those roads, makes it dangerous for other pedestrians and bicyclists (ever tried to bike around a school pick-up area? More dangerous than downtown areas). It is a huge waste of natural resources, a burden on parents, and it takes away healthy alternatives from children. There is a lot of talk on this board and in the US about obesity in childhood and this is one of the easiest ways to combat it.

If there was a protest in New York against parents driving their kids to school I would go to it.

Obviously I know that private preschools in the US aren't going to provide busing, but 10 year olds who can't walk 10 blocks to school drive me wacky.

So would you.....say....cut of your left breast rather then drive your kids to school? Wink

culturedmom's picture
Joined: 09/30/06
Posts: 1131

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

I think this is the general idea of it...they just want a way to address a situation that might come up. Obviously they can't enforce it.

I still think it's silly and somewhat insulting.

And how are you supposed to get your kids to school without dropping them off? That was a funny one!

And for the record, I don't think people should wear their pajamas out in public or to drop their kids off. Stacy & Clinton would agree. Smile Workout clothes are fine if you're about to exercise or just finishing, you'd wear those in public anyway if you were at a gym, at a class, out running, etc.

But in general, it's not a policy they can enforce, just a guideline they can use if they need to address someone's inappropriate clothing as needed. Maybe someone has been wearing a negligee?

This is exactly my point. I think if they actually went outand told parent in yoga pants and tanks that they couldn't drop their kids off, then I would be angry and think that writing an srticle about it and getting all up in a tizzy over it was worth while. But many times schools will have general policies to be able to cover possible extreme situations. If they wrote no negliges, no short shorts, no bikini tops, someone would find a way around it or wear soemthing not covered by the rules (like a mini mini skirt with no underwear) and they wouldn'tbe able to say anything about it. So they make it more vague and open ended so they can use thier discretion.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3183

I had no idea you just meant drive!!! Wouldn't the issue be the same for walking? I never thought to separate the driving from the walking. That's still dropping off.

And I get the breast metaphor too. It's a metaphor! Have you ever heard the expression "I'd give my right arm to _____."

I'd be a lousy homeschooler too. Oh my. And I was a great student. But yeesh! My kids would hate it too. And we live in an area with terrific public schools.

culturedmom's picture
Joined: 09/30/06
Posts: 1131

Last year in FL my kids went to a school outside their district, so no bus and way too far to walk or bike. So my only choice was to drive. The amount of time, gas, and fumes spent in the car waiting in that line was awful.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"Rivergallery" wrote:

Totally entertaining, one reason I can't stay away... but seriously LOL.. to try and say she is serious about doing it if she had to homeschool.. instead of it being in jest and an exageration is silly.

First off, my name is Melissa, not "she". Lots of things are silly. Being offended at the feelings of a stranger on homeschooling THEIR OWN CHILDREN is silly.

I would lose my mind if I had to homeschool all three of my children 4 and under. So yes, a breast is a good sacrifice compared to a mind. No "exageration" there.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3183

"culturedmom" wrote:

Last year in FL my kids went to a school outside their district, so no bus and way too far to walk or bike. So my only choice was to drive. The amount of time, gas, and fumes spent in the car waiting in that line was awful.

I still don't think the driving is an element in the dress code thing. Walking is no different.

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Joined: 09/15/05
Posts: 115

"Rivergallery" wrote:

The dramatics of the statement itself render it invalid because most sane people would not follow through in cutting off their breast if forced to alter their educational choices... YOU did not say "I would be open to it" nor "you wish you had been homeschooled as a teenager" in this post. I do not keep track of everyone's view points I take each debate pretty much as stand alone. You said you would cut off a body part if you had to do something. I can't think of anything I would cut off a body part for, except to save one of my children's lives.. possibly my own but I am not sure I could do it even to save my own life. I take things much more literal,... and so yes the pure extreme nature of your statement made it invalid for me.... It doesn't mean you would want to homeschool and wouldn't hate it and possibly suck at it.. It means... NO you really wouldn't cut off your breast, so why exaggerate to that extreme?

I really would rather cut off a body part than homeschool. It would literally ruin my life more than losing my breast would. Of course, it depends on the body part. If it was a leg, that may be different.

culturedmom's picture
Joined: 09/30/06
Posts: 1131

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

I still don't think the driving is an element in the dress code thing. Walking is no different.

Oh I agree. was just talking about driving not the dress code.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3183

Walking's worse, actually! At least the drivers can hide in their cars. Who cares if they're wearing pajama pants or short shorts or whatever?

Joined: 01/18/06
Posts: 1626

So, I'm wondering what terrible thing happens each time a person wears pajama pants into public? Is it just that others judge and gossip? Or is there actually something I'm missing that truly affects the well being of the person wearing the PJ pants, or those who are seen with that person, or those who are forced to gaze upon them?

Joined: 04/12/03
Posts: 1683

"blather" wrote:

Sorry, I have a life, with a job and kids to take care of and parents visiting. Sorry I didn't answer on your schedule.

I am very passionate about children getting to school on their own. Children close enough to school should walk/bike and if they are too far (and by this I mean farmland) then buses should be provided by the school. If there are countries which are cutting transportation then that is a huge issue in my eyes.

No way. My daughter is 7. The speed limit on the road her school is on is 50 except for a stretch right in front of her school where it is 25 when children are present. Yes, this IS a residential area. We just have extremely high speed limits.

The school she is zoned for is 1/2 mile away as the crow flies. In reality, that means walking on a sidewalk for the fist part and and crossing a dirt field for the rest of the way. Just not going to happen.

Parents lining up at schools creates dangers for children, creates problems for other users of those roads, makes it dangerous for other pedestrians and bicyclists (ever tried to bike around a school pick-up area? More dangerous than downtown areas). It is a huge waste of natural resources, a burden on parents, and it takes away healthy alternatives from children. There is a lot of talk on this board and in the US about obesity in childhood and this is one of the easiest ways to combat it.

Well, in my area, it's just what we have to do. People just know not to go past a school at dismissal if they are in any kind of hurry to get somewhere.

If there was a protest in New York against parents driving their kids to school I would go to it.

Obviously I know that private preschools in the US aren't going to provide busing, but 10 year olds who can't walk 10 blocks to school drive me wacky.

We live in different areas. Growing up in AZ, walking home from school could easily mean 100+ temperatures. 10 blocks would equal roughly a mile. It's just not something I would want my children to have to do. On rare occasions my 15 YO has to walk about 1/2 a mile in the heat, but never my 7YO.

Joined: 04/12/03
Posts: 1683

"JorgieGirl" wrote:

So, I'm wondering what terrible thing happens each time a person wears pajama pants into public? Is it just that others judge and gossip? Or is there actually something I'm missing that truly affects the well being of the person wearing the PJ pants, or those who are seen with that person, or those who are forced to gaze upon them?

In the article it amounts to modeling for the children. They want parents to follow the same dress code as the students, which includes no pajamas.

Joined: 01/18/06
Posts: 1626

I mean in general.

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Posts: 1538

"Potter75" wrote:

First off, my name is Melissa, not "she". Lots of things are silly. Being offended at the feelings of a stranger on homeschooling THEIR OWN CHILDREN is silly.

I would lose my mind if I had to homeschool all three of my children 4 and under. So yes, a breast is a good sacrifice compared to a mind. No "exageration" there.

I just had a flashback to my childhood:) My mom used to say the bolded all the time.

"JorgieGirl" wrote:

So, I'm wondering what terrible thing happens each time a person wears pajama pants into public? Is it just that others judge and gossip? Or is there actually something I'm missing that truly affects the well being of the person wearing the PJ pants, or those who are seen with that person, or those who are forced to gaze upon them?

A puppy dies.

j/k I think it is just a fashion thing. Some people think it is fashionable (mostly teenage girls I think), some people see it as acceptable so do it sometimes when lazy or in a hurry, and others dont approve and see it as a huge faux pas. Kinda like skinny jeans, or flip flops.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3183

"JorgieGirl" wrote:

I mean in general.

Do I honestly care what other people wear? Not really....mostly I just find peoplewatching fascinating. But I think that it means something to you as a person to get yourself together enough to not wear pajamas outside. Those are the clothes you sleep in, or lounge in, and usually when I see someone in pjs outside I assume (oh no! assume!) that they don't think all that much of themselves or they'd make the minimal effort to actually put clothing on before stepping outside. I think that's what they're trying to get across to the kids too, that a little effort is worthwhile. Maybe I just watch a lot of What Not To Wear. Workout clothes are different, you wear them for a specific reason and it means you are looking after yourself in another way. Wearing sweats 24/7? Same thing as the pjs. (Stacey & Clinton call it "giving up." I know I talk about them a lot but I have learned some good stuff from that show.)

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"JorgieGirl" wrote:

So, I'm wondering what terrible thing happens each time a person wears pajama pants into public? Is it just that others judge and gossip? Or is there actually something I'm missing that truly affects the well being of the person wearing the PJ pants, or those who are seen with that person, or those who are forced to gaze upon them?

I just think that it looks lazy and slightly disrespectful. Like, if I saw someone walking around in a bathrobe it would strike me the same way. I guess, to me, seeing these college kids walking to class in their pajamas......well.......I hope my kid will try a bit harder, when it comes to dressing to go to class. I don't bother gossiping with people about it as I don't find it all that interesting, I save that for the yoga jeggings or the lady with GIGANTIC fake boobs and eyelash extentions that are no joke over an inch long who wears animal print workout skorts at my gym. WAYYYYY more fun to gossip about Smile

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Joined: 06/07/06
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"blather" wrote:

Sorry, I have a life, with a job and kids to take care of and parents visiting. Sorry I didn't answer on your schedule.

I didn't mean it in a bad way, sorry if it came across that way. I was just anxious, that's all. Smile I knew you'd get around to answering when you had time.

I'll be back later to read more and reply....

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"ftmom" wrote:

I just had a flashback to my childhood:) My mom used to say the bolded all the time.

My Dad used to say it all the time to us if we called my Mom "She" Smile I used to say it to my husband all the time, if he called me "she" i would say "She being Melissa". He learned quickly ;0 It is disrespectful. Our kids can't do it either.

Joined: 03/14/09
Posts: 624

"ethanwinfield" wrote:

We live in different areas. Growing up in AZ, walking home from school could easily mean 100+ temperatures.

Yes, where I live it would be 100 F plus 90% humidity for a few months of the year. But every single child in a whole country is able to do it. It's more about will, political and other, than anything else. We have dangerous roads here too, but some of them are closed during the commute (7:30-8) and there are other workarounds as well. The government knows children will be walking so they plan things better than have been planned in North America for the last 50 years.

I have to afterschool my children and it is hell. If I could find someone who could do it and all they demanded in payment was my left breast, I would think about it. I mean, would there be a qualified surgeon involved or just some guy with a spoon?

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Joined: 04/10/09
Posts: 780

My son's school and my little half brother's school have pajama days.

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Joined: 05/18/06
Posts: 126

"blather" wrote:

Sorry, I have a life, with a job and kids to take care of and parents visiting. Sorry I didn't answer on your schedule.

I am very passionate about children getting to school on their own. Children close enough to school should walk/bike and if they are too far (and by this I mean farmland) then buses should be provided by the school. If there are countries which are cutting transportation then that is a huge issue in my eyes.

Parents lining up at schools creates dangers for children, creates problems for other users of those roads, makes it dangerous for other pedestrians and bicyclists (ever tried to bike around a school pick-up area? More dangerous than downtown areas). It is a huge waste of natural resources, a burden on parents, and it takes away healthy alternatives from children. There is a lot of talk on this board and in the US about obesity in childhood and this is one of the easiest ways to combat it.

If there was a protest in New York against parents driving their kids to school I would go to it.

Obviously I know that private preschools in the US aren't going to provide busing, but 10 year olds who can't walk 10 blocks to school drive me wacky.

Do you have research to support this? Because I think it's a load of BS. Lots of parents drive their kids to and from school here. Nobody has ever gotten injured. Buses are offered if you live too far to walk. Parents drive their kids to school by choice. And in most cases I find it's way healthier than having your kid be short on sleep because the bus comes at 7:00 even though school doesn't start until 8:30. In the afternoon kids can be outside playing rather than sitting on a bus until 4:00.

Joined: 04/12/03
Posts: 1683

"blather" wrote:

Yes, where I live it would be 100 F plus 90% humidity for a few months of the year. But every single child in a whole country is able to do it. It's more about will, political and other, than anything else. We have dangerous roads here too, but some of them are closed during the commute (7:30-8) and there are other workarounds as well. The government knows children will be walking so they plan things better than have been planned in North America for the last 50 years.

I have to afterschool my children and it is hell. If I could find someone who could do it and all they demanded in payment was my left breast, I would think about it. I mean, would there be a qualified surgeon involved or just some guy with a spoon?

Where I live our local districts know parents will be dropping their children off. When NCLB says you can attend other schools but parents have to transport their kid unless you are more than 3 miles away, they plan for drop-off and pick-up spots. No way kids as young as 4 can walk that distance - for so many reasons. Many of DD1's friends live 15+ miles from school. Their parents drop them off in the designated drop-off/pick-up area.

As for me, my high school was 5 miles from home. No bus for me jr. & sr. years. My asthma was so bad my doctor excused me from most physical activities growing up both inside and outside of school. While I can walk 5 miles now, I couldn't have then. It just wasn't physically possible.

In my district I've yet to encounter anyone who really cared what the parents were wearing. What matters is their kid made it to school and got picked up. Funny thing: at my old jr. high it was the walking students who caused the trouble - getting into fights, throwing rocks at cars, tagging the walls, stopping off at a friend's house to smoke pot/have sex/get drunk...

FLSunshineMom's picture
Joined: 06/07/06
Posts: 3859

I took Melissa's statement as simply a way to express her strong feelings on the subject, too. I think it was pretty effective in making the point she wanted to make about how she personally felt about homeschooling her own children. I thought it was pretty funny, probably because I can relate. I didn't know what I was getting into until I tried it for awhile with my DD.

That being said, I think homeschooling is awesome, if it works for the parent and child/children. My DH's sister homeschools her two kids and they have done awesome with it. Her kids are smart as a whip. My DH's brother's wife also homeschooled her child, and he is now in college studying to be a lawyer.

Anyway, back to the debate subject. Well, sort of.

I think in this day and age, it just isn't safe for kids to walk to school alone, unless it's right around the corner. I agree with Melissa that they can get exercise in a variety of other ways other than walking to school.

And I also agree that not every city is set up to make walking to school easy. We live a 20 minutes' drive from my DD's school, and I use the interstate to get there.

I haven't really seen problems with car line-ups in this area, either.

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