School Snacks

70 posts / 0 new
Last post
Joined: 06/04/07
Posts: 1368
School Snacks

A school regulates that for younger classes, the student is to bring a snack only for themselves each day. Should the snack be required to be store bought if the snack is only for the student and not for the class? If it is required and you disagree, would you challenge this issue and if so how? In some situations, how can they tell if the item is store bought? For example, fresh fruits and veggies not individually prepackaged?

AlyssaEimers's picture
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6560

I am not sure why it would need to be store bought if only for that student?

Joined: 06/04/07
Posts: 1368

I'm not sure why either. We got a letter addressing this from our dd's preschool, which threw me for a loop, so it's somewhat personal. But I don't know if it's something going on across the schools or if this is isolated. I get it if the snacks were for the entire class, but how is snack time any different than lunch time? Lunch time, they're allowed to bring whatever they want. The weird thing in the letter is that them saying they have an apple slicer and corer there if that makes it convenient for the parent. How would they know if the apple came from our backyard vs the store?

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"Beertje" wrote:

I'm not sure why either. We got a letter addressing this from our dd's preschool, which threw me for a loop, so it's somewhat personal. But I don't know if it's something going on across the schools or if this is isolated. I get it if the snacks were for the entire class, but how is snack time any different than lunch time? Lunch time, they're allowed to bring whatever they want. The weird thing in the letter is that them saying they have an apple slicer and corer there if that makes it convenient for the parent. How would they know if the apple came from our backyard vs the store?

There are no further regulations besides the fact that it has to be store bought? nothing about ingredients or anything? That's very strange. I would possibly ask them what the purpose of the rule is to start with, then after having all the facts it doesn't make sense, weigh it against the inconvenience it puts on you. If it seems worth it, then sure write a note or talk to the principal about why you think the rule doesn't make sense and why you feel it needs to be changed.

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

"KimPossible" wrote:

There are no further regulations besides the fact that it has to be store bought? nothing about ingredients or anything? That's very strange. I would possibly ask them what the purpose of the rule is to start with, then after having all the facts it doesn't make sense, weigh it against the inconvenience it puts on you. If it seems worth it, then sure write a note or talk to the principal about why you think the rule doesn't make sense and why you feel it needs to be changed.

I agree with this.

I remember hearing something about some schools requiring store bought meals because they had better control over the ingredients (I think it was probably something to do with a "nut free" policy.) I would investigate to find out the reasoning, and then if it still doesn't make sense or is too big of a burden, I would address with with the principal. It seems very odd if they aren't required to do the same for lunch, unless (again) it's for something like peanut allergies, where they may have a "nut free" zone in the cafeteria, but maybe not in the classroom?

I would also clarify what is meant by "store bought". I pretty much buy everything at the grocery store. If I send baby carrots (bought at the grocery store) and dip (bought at the store) - does that count as store bought? Or does it have to be individually packaged? That would drive me nuts (if everything has to be individually packaged); so expensive, and such a waste of packaging.

carg0612's picture
Joined: 09/23/09
Posts: 1554

Hmmm, I agree, seems odd that the only stipulation is that it is store bought. I also agree about finding out the reasoning behind the new rule.

In our school if you're bringing in a snack to share for like a birthday or something it must be store bought (so they can read the ingredients and any warnings) and individually wrapped.

But personal snacks they have put no restrictions on at all.

As to would I challenge it? Huh, I would at least ask for a logical reason and then I'd see if I felt that it is worthwhile to challenge it. Mostly I don't think it's worth it because I am so busy otherwise but if they have no compelling reason I might speak up.

(I posted at the same time as Alissa) I also agree with what Alissa said.

GL - I hope you can figure out what's behind the request.

TyrantOfTheWeek's picture
Joined: 12/26/05
Posts: 1147

I bet it has to do with some sort of peanut ban.
I know my kids' preschool says no grapes or popcorn in their lunches. I guess in case another kid gets a hold of them?

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

"TyrantOfTheWeek" wrote:

I bet it has to do with some sort of peanut ban.
I know my kids' preschool says no grapes or popcorn in their lunches. I guess in case another kid gets a hold of them?

I've never heard of that! Is it because they are considered choking hazards, or is it an allergy thing?

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

Alissa, they are two of the most choked upon items. Hot dogs would be the other. My DS was in a co-op preschool and we had to provide the snacks for the entire class a few times a year, we couldn't do popcorn and we could do grapes but they had to be cut in 1/2. Annoying. Needless to say I never brought grapes on my week.

I don't get it. Unless one is farming or growing their own vegetables, aren't most items that one eats from a store of some sort?

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"TyrantOfTheWeek" wrote:

I bet it has to do with some sort of peanut ban.
I know my kids' preschool says no grapes or popcorn in their lunches. I guess in case another kid gets a hold of them?

Doesn't make sense if its a peanut ban. The rule is "Store bought" not store bought AND "no peanuts."

If the kids can bring peanut filled snacks from stores and they have to keep the kids separate, then why can't they bring peanut filled snacks from home and keep the kids separate. All snacks form home go to a peanut table.

Joined: 06/04/07
Posts: 1368

The letter doesn't discuss allergies or choking hazards, nor does it give the reasoning behind the letter. But the impression it left both DH and I is that the snacks were to be prepackaged when it stated that the food must be store bought. With my older kids, when they were at the same school, they rotated snack days where we provided for the entire class one time a month. The items needed to be prepackaged showing no contamination and listing all ingredients. Somewhere in between this has changed. We are bulk purchasers so any snacks would be put in ziploc bags unless it's a larger whole fruit. We also not only garden, but we also make our own breads and baked goods so while the ingredients may be store bought, it's still homemade.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"Potter75" wrote:

Alissa, they are two of the most choked upon items. Hot dogs would be the other. My DS was in a co-op preschool and we had to provide the snacks for the entire class a few times a year, we couldn't do popcorn and we could do grapes but they had to be cut in 1/2. Annoying. Needless to say I never brought grapes on my week.

I don't get it. Unless one is farming or growing their own vegetables, aren't most items that one eats from a store of some sort?

During the late summer and fall here? Very few of my vegetables come from a store, they come from my in-laws huge garden. Gardening is pretty popular here.

Got an apple and a pear tree full of fruit too.

So yes....unless you are growing your own veggies, but growing your own veggies is pretty common, no? Also, what about farm stands or CSA's? Does that count as 'store bought?'

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"KimPossible" wrote:

During the late summer and fall here? Very few of my vegetables come from a store, they come from my in-laws huge garden. Gardening is pretty popular here.

Got an apple and a pear tree full of fruit too.

So yes....unless you are growing your own veggies, but growing your own veggies is pretty common, no? Also, what about farm stands or CSA's? Does that count as 'store bought?'

Yeah, but I would bet though for the bulk of the school year in MN most people aren't snacking out of their garden Smile Maybe I'm wrong and their growing season is much longer than I am picturing.

I would not consider a CSA to be a "store". Farm bought, maybe? I don't really think that growing all of ones own vegetables IS all that common (statistically). I'd be curious to see actual percentages on that nationwide in America. We garden, but it is no where near big enough to meet the needs of our family of 5. We have a CSA and orchard share to meet those needs, and just supplement with things that we really like. (Fiddlehead fern party this spring, Kim??? Lol

Joined: 06/04/07
Posts: 1368

Yeah, the gardening ends in October for us. That said, with proper storage many foods (especially apples, potatoes, and squashes) can last most of the winter if not through. The rest of the goods are either canned or frozen in some way, shape, or form. It is not all consumed only during the harvest season. So between homegrown fruits and veggies as well as baked goods, that becomes quite a chunk of food that is not considered store bought. Our community is also a huge farming community.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

Yes, I would be bummed if my Mom sent me to school with a potato or a squash for a snack Wink

I mean, I can't really see a teacher calling you up to ask if you grew the apple or bought it at a store? Do you think that they would? I feel like I don't understand the debate, really?

ftmom's picture
Joined: 09/04/06
Posts: 1538

I would honestly ask for clarification of what the heck their letter means. It doesnt seem to make much sense to me. Maybe they were still talking about snacks for the class and just werent very clear?

Anyways, I would definitely ask, and then ask why if it really is that it needs to be store bought. I would also suspect that whole fruits and veg. would be exempt, as it is pretty obvious what they are (dont contain other ingredients).

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

I would definitely ask for clarification. We send individual snacks and last year they had to be nut free. But there was no rule about "store-bought". I would just ask and see what happens next. Post the answer!

Spacers's picture
Joined: 12/29/03
Posts: 4100

I'd ask for clarification. I can't imagine how the difference between homegrown & store bought should matter to anyone when you're talking about apples or celery sticks. But I can see how it *might* make a difference with something like a muffin where there's a potential for nut or dairy allergies. At Tiven's preschool there was a kid who was allergic to dairy. The school provided breakfast & lunch, and also a snack for the kids who stayed all afternoon. This kid's mom packed his own food, but the teachers had a heck of a time keeping him from eating what everyone else was. Little kids don't always *not* share, and they aren't above eating crumbs off a table, and they don't wash their hands before smearing them on a friend who might be allergic. If someone suddenly breaks out into a rash, it would be good to know what they might have gotten into. OTOH if you send a slice of zucchini bread, you could include a label identifying the ingredients so I still don't see why storebought would matter.

Our school's rule is "healthy" snacks, and it really ticks me off. I know they mean well, but when I send low-fat whole grain crackers along with a piece of stick cheese, and the crackers come home because someone at school thought they were cookies, that's just ridiculous! :rolleyes: And once I sent carrot & celery sticks standing on end in some ranch dressing, and they didn't let her eat it because the ranch dressing wasn't healthy, and since the veggies were already in it, they didn't let her eat those, either. :evil: Seriously, either trust that I can feed my child properly, or take over completely and provide all five meals for her. Don't withhold the food that I provide & make my child go hungry!

Joined: 06/04/07
Posts: 1368

What's surprising is that this dd actually loves all her veggies, so while it's weird for me, it wouldn't be weird for her to want squash for a snack. She's an odd child.

But the debate at hand is should the school mandate that all snacks given to one's own child be store bought? What is the difference between snack and lunch time that one has to be store bought (and individually packaged? I need clarification on this.) and the other doesn't, when both instances it's to feed only their own child? And is this isolated or is this request normal?

I personally would rather give her things readily available at home be it homemade or from bulk purchases than to buy the individual portion prepackaged snacks. I can see a limitation list of foods banned for specific reasons, such as allergies and choking, but I don't see the issue of being able to bring snacks made from home solely for my child. I'd rather have the flexibility to cut up carrot and celery sticks and put them in a ziploc bag along with a small container with dip from home than to buy prepackaged dip and veggie sticks. Most of those don't look very appetizing to begin with. From what the responses seem to be, this request is not typical for a school either.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"Beertje" wrote:

What's surprising is that this dd actually loves all her veggies, so while it's weird for me, it wouldn't be weird for her to want squash for a snack. She's an odd child.

.

I'm sure she is a wonderful eater, but I have yet to see a child (or anyone) gnosh down on a whole raw squash. So presumably it would be cooked or rendered into some baked good or whatnot. If it was cooked or baked and in your container, it would clearly be homemade, not store bought, so I guess I wasn't understanding how it mattered if the squash itself came from your garden and was properly stored, or from a store.

I would ask for clarification. And if it was required that snacks come individually packaged, I would probably try to get the rule changed as it is wasteful and unnecessarily expensive to make parents buy individually packaged snacks vs letting them buy in bulk or make their own. If if were snacks for the whole class I would agree with the rule ~ but for your own child? No way.

Joined: 06/04/07
Posts: 1368

"Spacers" wrote:

I'd ask for clarification. I can't imagine how the difference between homegrown & store bought should matter to anyone when you're talking about apples or celery sticks. But I can see how it *might* make a difference with something like a muffin where there's a potential for nut or dairy allergies. At Tiven's preschool there was a kid who was allergic to dairy. The school provided breakfast & lunch, and also a snack for the kids who stayed all afternoon. This kid's mom packed his own food, but the teachers had a heck of a time keeping him from eating what everyone else was. Little kids don't always *not* share, and they aren't above eating crumbs off a table, and they don't wash their hands before smearing them on a friend who might be allergic. If someone suddenly breaks out into a rash, it would be good to know what they might have gotten into. OTOH if you send a slice of zucchini bread, you could include a label identifying the ingredients so I still don't see why storebought would matter.

Our school's rule is "healthy" snacks, and it really ticks me off. I know they mean well, but when I send low-fat whole grain crackers along with a piece of stick cheese, and the crackers come home because someone at school thought they were cookies, that's just ridiculous! :rolleyes: And once I sent carrot & celery sticks standing on end in some ranch dressing, and they didn't let her eat it because the ranch dressing wasn't healthy, and since the veggies were already in it, they didn't let her eat those, either. :evil: Seriously, either trust that I can feed my child properly, or take over completely and provide all five meals for her. Don't withhold the food that I provide & make my child go hungry!

Yeah, the sharing food makes sense of them being wary of an issue. I will ask for more clarification. I also don't want them refusing to allow her to eat something because it wasn't considered store bought under their criteria. I certainly wouldn't mind including the list of ingredients. Thanks!

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

"Beertje" wrote:

The letter doesn't discuss allergies or choking hazards, nor does it give the reasoning behind the letter. But the impression it left both DH and I is that the snacks were to be prepackaged when it stated that the food must be store bought. With my older kids, when they were at the same school, they rotated snack days where we provided for the entire class one time a month. The items needed to be prepackaged showing no contamination and listing all ingredients. Somewhere in between this has changed. We are bulk purchasers so any snacks would be put in ziploc bags unless it's a larger whole fruit. We also not only garden, but we also make our own breads and baked goods so while the ingredients may be store bought, it's still homemade.

*Shudder* I'm picturing those little "snack pack" things with the crackers and "cheez" and those awful 100 calorie packs of crap. If you want to fight this, I would play up the not wanting to send "junk food" angle. I can't think of many healthy foods that come "pre-packaged." Even those baggies of apple slices squick me out because I think they must be full of preservatives.

I guess if I had to do it, I would lean heavily on string cheese, yogurt, Lara bars, and maybe those individual packages of carrots and dip if they weren't ungodly expensive and pumped full of preservatives. But I'd scowl about it. LOL

ClairesMommy's picture
Joined: 08/15/06
Posts: 2299

"Alissa_Sal" wrote:

*Shudder* I'm picturing those little "snack pack" things with the crackers and "cheez" and those awful 100 calorie packs of crap. If you want to fight this, I would play up the not wanting to send "junk food" angle. I can't think of many healthy foods that come "pre-packaged." Even those baggies of apple slices squick me out because I think they must be full of preservatives.

I guess if I had to do it, I would lean heavily on string cheese, yogurt, Lara bars, and maybe those individual packages of carrots and dip if they weren't ungodly expensive and pumped full of preservatives. But I'd scowl about it. LOL

Don't forget the lips 'n a$$holes deli meat. Oh, that's a Lunchables. Sorry.

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

"Claire'sMommy" wrote:

Don't forget the lips 'n a$$holes deli meat. Oh, that's a Lunchables. Sorry.

ROFL

Starryblue702's picture
Joined: 04/06/11
Posts: 5454

No it should not be required to be store bought. Schools can't dictate something like that to parents. I can understand if it were for the entire class (like cupcakes for a birthday) why it should be storebought, but otherwise... absolutely not.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"Starryblue702" wrote:

No it should not be required to be store bought. Schools can't dictate something like that to parents. I can understand if it were for the entire class (like cupcakes for a birthday) why it should be storebought, but otherwise... absolutely not.

WHy not? Schools can dictate no peanuts. They can dictate what children wear. They can dictate lots of things. I don't know if the school is public or private, but if it is private they can pretty much dictate anything they want. If the state requires it, schools certainly have to comply with the law, don't they?

It looks from Google as though it is a state law in MN that all snacks sent to school be store bought, though I can't tell if it specifies that that is only for shared snacks or individual snacks. Maybe someone with more google-fu than me could figure that out.

carg0612's picture
Joined: 09/23/09
Posts: 1554

"Spacers" wrote:

Our school's rule is "healthy" snacks, and it really ticks me off. I know they mean well, but when I send low-fat whole grain crackers along with a piece of stick cheese, and the crackers come home because someone at school thought they were cookies, that's just ridiculous! :rolleyes: And once I sent carrot & celery sticks standing on end in some ranch dressing, and they didn't let her eat it because the ranch dressing wasn't healthy, and since the veggies were already in it, they didn't let her eat those, either. :evil: Seriously, either trust that I can feed my child properly, or take over completely and provide all five meals for her. Don't withhold the food that I provide & make my child go hungry!

Ok that ticks me off!!! They with-held her food??? That is just stupid. Let's not let her eat ranch dressing so she can be hungry and not be able to concentrate - that'll teach 'em!!! I mean what? That's just counter-intuitive.

Our school requests that "healthier-choice" snacks be sent. They won't take your kid's Doritos away but they'll send you a note requesting that you make a healthier choice for your child with suggestions. They really don't want a bunch of high sugar or high fat foods but they aren't going to take food away from the children. They will talk to the parents while trying not to punish the kids.

They are really trying to get kids away from chips and cookies for snacks and trying to steer them towards something that their bodies can sustain for learning and concentration.

My DD is uber picky and I will send her with cheese and crackers but they don't complain about the cheese. Other times I'll send her with raw green beans or bell peppers and cheese crackers or mini-muffins that I make at home. So far I haven't received any letters of complaint.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"Potter75" wrote:

Yeah, but I would bet though for the bulk of the school year in MN most people aren't snacking out of their garden Smile Maybe I'm wrong and their growing season is much longer than I am picturing.

I would not consider a CSA to be a "store". Farm bought, maybe? I don't really think that growing all of ones own vegetables IS all that common (statistically). I'd be curious to see actual percentages on that nationwide in America. We garden, but it is no where near big enough to meet the needs of our family of 5. We have a CSA and orchard share to meet those needs, and just supplement with things that we really like. (Fiddlehead fern party this spring, Kim??? Lol

I suppose thats true! My in-laws can a lot of veggies and use them for a lot of the winter but even with the size garden they have, they eventually run out and i'm certain their garden is bigger than average for sure. And even then, home canned veggies are not what kids are binging to school.

Love Love fiddleheads!

Spacers's picture
Joined: 12/29/03
Posts: 4100

"Potter75" wrote:

WHy not? Schools can dictate no peanuts. They can dictate what children wear. They can dictate lots of things. I don't know if the school is public or private, but if it is private they can pretty much dictate anything they want. If the state requires it, schools certainly have to comply with the law, don't they?

Dictating what a child puts on her body to ensure her safety while playing & doing P.E. is far different from dictating what she can put into her body. The school has absolutely no right to dictate things that go beyond safety & education. For example, they can dictate a reasonable dress code, but not a uniform, at least not in California. And I say they can dictate "healthy" but not "store bought" for items that only my child should be eating.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"Spacers" wrote:

Dictating what a child puts on her body to ensure her safety while playing & doing P.E. is far different from dictating what she can put into her body. The school has absolutely no right to dictate things that go beyond safety & education. For example, they can dictate a reasonable dress code, but not a uniform, at least not in California. And I say they can dictate "healthy" but not "store bought" for items that only my child should be eating.

How is dictating a dress code different than dictating a uniform? Aren't both dictating what a child puts on their body?

And definitions of healthy can vary wildly, don't you think? How is dictating one administrators definition of healthy all that different from dictating where said "healthy" food comes from?

I think that private schools in California can dictate those things, can't they? Also, according to this:

http://www.gate.net/~rwms/UniformDWilliams.html

at least some public school districts (long beach, CA?) have instituted mandatory uniform policies (with smashing success, I might add?).

Spacers's picture
Joined: 12/29/03
Posts: 4100

"Potter75" wrote:

How is dictating a dress code different than dictating a uniform? Aren't both dictating what a child puts on their body?

And definitions of healthy can vary wildly, don't you think? How is dictating one administrators definition of healthy all that different from dictating where said "healthy" food comes from?

I think that private schools in California can dictate those things, can't they? Also, according to this:

http://www.gate.net/~rwms/UniformDWilliams.html

at least some public school districts (long beach, CA?) have instituted mandatory uniform policies (with smashing success, I might add?).

I'm pretty sure we've had the uniform debate already. A uniform is dictating what a student can wear (with little room for personal expression) where a dress code is dictating what a student can't wear, and by CA law a school dress code must be set solely to ensure safety and a minimum amount of classroom disruption, not to suppress students' personal expression. And parents have the right to waive the uniform, even in Long Beach: http://www.lbusd.k12.ca.us/uniforms/article_7.cfm

It's the same thing with food IMHO. A public school should only be able to dictate something related to safety & education. Kids need to eat healthy foods to grow up healthy, and they are also learning about healthy foods in the classroom, and that should be modeled in their meals. And yes, "healthy" can be interpreted widely. But if I, as a parent, send something to school that I believe is "healthy" or even "healthy enough" and it's not intended to be shared with any other student, then the school had better not keep it away from my child. Is there something "healthier" than cheese & crackers or ranch dressing? Sure. Is it something my child will eat, out of a bag, at school? Maybe not. If there's a question about it, the parent should have the last say.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

Yes, you and I have very different ideas of personal (or parental) autonomy in public or private places. I think that when you accept the services of a school (be it public or private) you accept certain rules within those confines. Uniforms, attendance policies, tardy policies, food policies all come under the umbrella of what I think that a school can rightfully dictate when the rules suit the needs of a majority of the students and are made with the greater good in mind. If you don't like a rule, I believe that there are correct channels to get it changed, but I don't believe that a parents "rights" trump all other rights or rules which are sometimes made for the greater good, when you are choosing to send your child to an institution which is charged with educating more than just your (general) precious child.

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

"Potter75" wrote:

Yes, you and I have very different ideas of personal (or parental) autonomy in public or private places. I think that when you accept the services of a school (be it public or private) you accept certain rules within those confines. Uniforms, attendance policies, tardy policies, food policies all come under the umbrella of what I think that a school can rightfully dictate when the rules suit the needs of a majority of the students and are made with the greater good in mind. If you don't like a rule, I believe that there are correct channels to get it changed, but I don't believe that a parents "rights" trump all other rights or rules which are sometimes made for the greater good, when you are choosing to send your child to an institution which is charged with educating more than just your (general) precious child.

I agree with this to a certain extent, but I also think that it can be taken too far, and IMO, it sounds like Spacers' daughter's school takes it a little far. I totally understand them not wanting parents to send junk food for a snack, but I honestly wouldn't call carrots and celery and ranch dressing (or whole wheat crackers and cheese) "junk food" and I don't think that the majority of people would either. Sure, ranch dressing has a lot of fat, but unless a child has need of a very low fat diet, I wouldn't worry about them ingesting a bit of ranch dressing if it means they are also eating veggies. Just like I wouldn't worry about my kid eating a little bit of butter in an otherwise healthy meal, or eating some whole fat dairy, or whatever. Same thing with cheese and crackers - I'm sure there are healthier alternatives out there, but I can't see calling whole wheat crackers and real cheese (not "cheez") junk either. I think it can be taken too far, for sure, ESPECIALLY if they take it to the point where they would rather a child go hungry than let her eat a little ranch dressing on her carrots. To me, that sounds completely absurd and defies common sense. I think that even when you are using the school's services, there surely has to be a balance between the parents' autonomy and the school's rules, or else they are bad rules.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

Of course there does, I assumed that that goes without saying.

Just because I disagree with Spacers that the parents autonomy trumps all does not mean that I as a parent am willing to give the schools 100% autonomy over my child.

As stated on the "store bought snack" thing, I would first ask for clarification and if the rule was literally "the snack must come in a prepackaged bag" I would try to get the rule changed. If they couldn't change it, I would decide if it was important enough to me to continue on at that school or not.

Spacers's picture
Joined: 12/29/03
Posts: 4100

"Potter75" wrote:

If they couldn't change it, I would decide if it was important enough to me to continue on at that school or not.

And if they wouldn't change it, then I would say the rule is not applicable since it's not related to my child's or any other child's safety or education and is therefore something the school can't dictate. Bad rules need to be changed, and sometimes that change comes by parents ignoring them or challenging them. I'm not going to remove my child from a school we & she otherwise love, over snacks. If there was an extenuating circumstance, like I said above at her preschool there was a documented allergy in her classroom in a child who had a history of picking up other kids' crumbs, then I would accomodate a request to only send foods that are clearly labeled. But prepackaged foods only? I can't see any logical reason for that, and it's not something a school has the right to mandate. Schools can mandate safety & education, and that's it.

Joined: 12/10/05
Posts: 1681

I would definitely ask for clarification and if they mean they require kids to eat only prepackaged cookies/crackers/muffin/etc then I would strongly object. That crap is horrible for you! My kids never have prepackaged stuff in their lunches (or at home).

If they mean store bought apples vs home grown... well, that is just silly.

As far as allergies go, my dd is allergic to corn (regular corn, corn syrup, etc). There are hardly any prepackage foods she can eat! Everything needs to be homemade! A friends dd is allergic to soy and again, that is in just about everything.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"Spacers" wrote:

And if they wouldn't change it, then I would say the rule is not applicable since it's not related to my child's or any other child's safety or education and is therefore something the school can't dictate. Bad rules need to be changed, and sometimes that change comes by parents ignoring them or challenging them. I'm not going to remove my child from a school we & she otherwise love, over snacks. If there was an extenuating circumstance, like I said above at her preschool there was a documented allergy in her classroom in a child who had a history of picking up other kids' crumbs, then I would accomodate a request to only send foods that are clearly labeled. But prepackaged foods only? I can't see any logical reason for that, and it's not something a school has the right to mandate. Schools can mandate safety & education, and that's it.

When you say that you would say that the rule is non applicable, do you mean that you would not follow it (after challenging it and having your challenge denied)?

Of course bad rules need to be changed....what if, like I suspect, this is a state law? Would you abide by it, or would you have your child be kicked out of school?

I agree that I can't see any logical reason for that rule......but if it was a rule, and you could not change it, what would you do? Parental autonomy being supreme and all.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

"Spacers" wrote:

And if they wouldn't change it, then I would say the rule is not applicable since it's not related to my child's or any other child's safety or education and is therefore something the school can't dictate. Bad rules need to be changed, and sometimes that change comes by parents ignoring them or challenging them. I'm not going to remove my child from a school we & she otherwise love, over snacks. If there was an extenuating circumstance, like I said above at her preschool there was a documented allergy in her classroom in a child who had a history of picking up other kids' crumbs, then I would accomodate a request to only send foods that are clearly labeled. But prepackaged foods only? I can't see any logical reason for that, and it's not something a school has the right to mandate. Schools can mandate safety & education, and that's it.

You know, I think I agree with you. If they couldn't come up with a reason I would fight it as long as it didn't stigmatize my kid. I have a way of being annoyingly persistent that's rather successful. Smile

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

You know, I think I agree with you. If they couldn't come up with a reason I would fight it as long as it didn't stigmatize my kid. I have a way of being annoyingly persistent that's rather successful. Smile

Again, were it law, what would you do?

I'm totally an opinionated parent when it comes to food (as if y'all didn't know that :))......but I don't understand what you guys would do if it were state or local health code or law. You have a disclaimer in there (stigmatization)......but Spacers does not. I'm so curious.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

"Potter75" wrote:

Again, were it law, what would you do?

I'm totally an opinionated parent when it comes to food (as if y'all didn't know that :))......but I don't understand what you guys would do if it were state or local health code or law. You have a disclaimer in there (stigmatization)......but Spacers does not. I'm so curious.

If it were law I'd be sneaky and still do what I wanted. I'd find a way to get away with it. Just being honest. I think that's what I'd do.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

If it were law I'd be sneaky and still do what I wanted. I'd find a way to get away with it. Just being honest. I think that's what I'd do.

I'm with you.

They catch you. What do you do?

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

"Potter75" wrote:

I'm with you.

They catch you. What do you do?

I obey for a few days or so and then go back to being sneaky. It wouldn't be hard to do. Worst case scenario I'd print up fake labels!

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

I obey for a few days or so and then go back to being sneaky. It wouldn't be hard to do. Worst case scenario I'd print up fake labels!

Lol

I'm with you, Laurie. If that's state law, that is a completely ridiculous law. I would have a heyday trying to think of ways to sneak around it. Why on earth would anyone legislate that kids have to snack on prepackaged cookies? That's so backwards. I don't think that state law should legislate what kids snack on either way, but if they just CAN'T keep their noses out of kid's snacks, I would think that they would legislate that kids can't snack on prepackaged cookies. Isn't the big push to keep junk food OUT of schools?

ftmom's picture
Joined: 09/04/06
Posts: 1538

For those of you who would just do what you want anyways, wouldnt you be worried about how that would effect your child when they are found out? I could never do that to my child. A few times in my life my mother has used me to push her agenda (and I am not talking big things here) and I dont think I have really ever forgiven her for the way it made me feel. I try really hard not to do that to my child.

IMO, if you dont agree, talk adult to adult with the teacher, principal, and if it is a law then find out what you would need to do to get it changed......but leave the kids out of it, it is not their fault.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

I'm w you, kyla

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

Well, that's why Laurie put in the qualifier that she would do it as long as it wouldn't stigmatize the child (and I agree).

I also agree that I would try to talk to the teacher/principal first - I wouldn't just go off half cocked the first day without even mentioning it to anyone at the school. I might even try to get the law changed (although to be completely honest, I don't know how much time I would have to put in getting signatures and what not) if it were a law. But in the meantime, if I could just get around it without causing a bad situation for my kid at school (which, IMO has a lot to do with the way the teacher handles it - if the teacher is calling the kid out in front of the class for having the wrong snack, s/he's not handling it very well) then I would.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

Yep. Would never let it become my kid's problem.

Joined: 06/04/07
Posts: 1368

Well good news. The notice they gave out was outdated information that they never updated. It was the same notice they used when they still rotated the snack bucket that was used to share with the entire class. They stopped that when they started providing full day preschool. That was a few years ago, so I'm surprised this wasn't caught earlier. When bringing snacks only for our child, it can be anything we want. Phew and YaY!!!!!!!!! But from what I could find in our state laws, they dictate prepackaged food only when sharing the food. So on birthdays, holidays, or special occasions, we will need to provide prepackaged food and not the homemade cupcakes, etc.
.
That being said, if they were going to stick to what was said on the notice, I would most likely challenge their reasoning behind it and have them back it up with state law. If it's not state law and just their rule, I would bring it to the school board as an issue that needs to be addressed. I would also try to sneak in snacks that may not fit the criteria until they put a stop to it, with a backup snack in the event they withhold it from my child while using the argument of them both being store bought.

Joined: 05/31/06
Posts: 4780

I'm glad, that makes sense.

Out of curiosity~ everyone who would not obey the hypothetical rule in a hypothetical situation, would you worry at all about what that teaches your child? How would you justify it? Would you say "it is okay to sneak around rules that Mommy does not agree with so take this homemade snack"?

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

"Potter75" wrote:

I'm glad, that makes sense.

Out of curiosity~ everyone who would not obey the hypothetical rule in a hypothetical situation, would you worry at all about what that teaches your child? How would you justify it? Would you say "it is okay to sneak around rules that Mommy does not agree with so take this homemade snack"?

Yes. I don't have a problem teaching them not to obey all rules.

Joined: 06/04/07
Posts: 1368

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

Yes. I don't have a problem teaching them not to obey all rules.

Ditto. My older kids love to challenge rules they don't agree with as well. Keeps us and their teachers on our toes.

Pages