Should homeschooled kids get to play on school sports teams
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Thread: Should homeschooled kids get to play on school sports teams

  1. #1
    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    Default Should homeschooled kids get to play on school sports teams

    I took this debate topic from another forum

    Home-Schooled Students Fight To Play On Public School Teams : NPR

    Legislative battles are being fought around the country over whether or not to let home-schooled students play on public high school teams.

    Roughly half of U.S. states have passed laws making them eligible to play on the teams. Advocates have dubbed them "Tim Tebow bills," after the NFL quarterback who was home-schooled when he played on a high school team.

    But an attempt by Indiana to find a middle ground may not have solved the problem in that state.

    Somewhere In The Middle

    In May, the Indiana High School Athletic Association changed its rules to make home-schooled students eligible to play, but they left it up to local schools to decide whether to allow these students on their teams.

    "There are those within our membership that are not real excited about this rule change, and that was the reason why there was so much resistance to begin with," says Bobby Cox, who heads the organization.

    Cox supported the compromise after lawmakers failed to pass a law in 2011 requiring all schools to allow home-schooled students on their teams. At the time, he lobbied against the bill ? arguing it did not adequately guarantee that home-schooled students meet the same academic standards as public school kids.

    Cox says a significant portion of the athletic association believes that when a child decides to be home-schooled, they make a choice to forgo other opportunities.

    "On the other side of that ledger, we have those that are in agreement that says, 'Well, a parent should always have the right to educate their child however they want to, however they ought to be able to pick and choose whatever opportunities that are available, from whatever institution or whatever agency,' " says Cox.

    Kids At The Heart Of The Debate

    Noel Keeble, 15, is the type of student-athlete the athletic association ruled on. He is one of four children home-schooled by his mother, who has a master's degree in education.

    Keeble wants to be a professional soccer player, and plays with a private club in the spring. In the fall, he does not have a team to play on.

    "All of the club teams let the high school players play for their school team. I do not get seen as much, I do not get as much training as everyone else, and I do not stay as sharp and ready," he says.

    Lake Central, the high school that Keeble is zoned to attend, is in a district that has decided not to let home-schooled students play on its sports teams. Aside from academic oversight, the district would require Keeble to take at least one class and pass certain state tests ? and the state does not reimburse districts for home-schoolers.

    "It is difficult to justify allowing a true home-school student to participate in our activities when they don't necessarily have the same oversight exercised for our current full-time enrolled students," says Lake Central Principal Robin Tobias.

    Keeble's mom, Donna, says that is unfair. After a recent referendum, parents are paying higher taxes; she thinks athletics should be separate from academics.

    "If the gym and the weight room and the soccer field are part of those facilities, I just want him to have access to it," she says.

    Tradition Influences Laws

    Bob Gardner, head of the National Federation of State High School Associations, says some of this conflict is rooted in tradition.

    "One of the cardinal principles of all states when they began regulating high school athletics in their state was that a youngster only can participate on a school in which he is enrolled, and taking academic, and passing his academic classes," he says.

    The members of Gardner's group are now almost evenly divided. Each year, a few states opt to re-evaluate whether to allow home-schoolers to play on public school teams.

    In the meantime, kids like Keeble wait to see if it will ever be their turn on the team.

  2. #2
    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    I don't see why not their taxes are paying for school sports why shouldn't they be able to play?
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    I guess I have some questions.

    1. Are there requirements that the public school kids must adhere to, that the homeschooled kid wouldn't have to?
    2. Does this mean that a kid who goes to the school and tries out for the team might lose his or her spot to a kid who doesn't go to that school?
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    It brings up a really interesting issue. Like, this kid could conceivably "home school" but really do school for like 2 hours a day and have private soccer coaches all day long and just be using the public school as a venue for recruitment for college scholarships.

    It opens up an ugly opportunity for predatory practices, especially in inner cities and basketball or football recruits (basketball, especially, where the kids can go directly to the NBA.....)......sure, now kids like LaBron are being "homeschooled" (aka play ball with special coaches all day) and then play on their local HS team, and go directly into the draft with less education then they were even getting before when they were HS superstars, or were skating through college before entering the draft to play in the NFL. It certainly has the potential for abuse. And is it fair that a kid who can have all of those hours of special coaching time is competing against kids who are in the school that the kid wants to play on the team for? Interesting. As this kid wants to be a "professional soccer player" this is exactly the kind of case that would highlight that sort of thing.

    I'd say that MOST of the time its just a normal homeschooled kid looking for some socialization or whatnot, but its hard to argue that in some circumstances it would be very unfair or that the potential for abuse as mentioned above is clearly not there. Its no secret that these kids who have mad bb talent are already totally preyed upon and scouted from the age of 12 or so. It is so not hard to picture a scenario in which a coach or other figure would undertake the role of "homeschooling" prime talent, 100% to their financial benefit, not the kids educational benefit, and obviously that would be a HUGE problem.

    Yes, they pay taxes. But then again, they choose not to be a part of the school. Part of me thinks that they don't then get to pick and choose. Like, they don't get to show up for art and theatre but nothing else. Why sports?

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    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by freddieflounder101 View Post
    I guess I have some questions.

    1. Are there requirements that the public school kids must adhere to, that the homeschooled kid wouldn't have to?
    2. Does this mean that a kid who goes to the school and tries out for the team might lose his or her spot to a kid who doesn't go to that school?
    These are the issues I have with it. I don't know how they would reconcile the requirements academic or otherwise that are typically expected of the public school students with the homeschool students. Maybe in some states, based on homeschool requirements it would be possible, but i would think in other states it wouldn't be.

    As to the question about if a public school child should lose their spot to a homeschool child, i don't know.

    To me, this seems akin to me wanting to put Emma on a sports team in our public school instead of her private school because I think the public school team is a better team....or wanting her on the field hockey teacm at the public school because her private school doesn't have one. I think i make certain sacrifices by choosing not to send her to the public school regardless of if i pay taxes or not and so its not reasonable to think those should be options available to me. Plus I dont think there is any inherent right to play whatever specific sport you want, so its not owed to anyone.

    For that reason, I'm leaning towards 'no'.

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    Quote Originally Posted by freddieflounder101 View Post
    I guess I have some questions.

    1. Are there requirements that the public school kids must adhere to, that the homeschooled kid wouldn't have to?
    2. Does this mean that a kid who goes to the school and tries out for the team might lose his or her spot to a kid who doesn't go to that school?
    Public school athletes have GPA requirements as well as attendance and behavior requirements that would be impossible to apply to homeschooled kids.

    And yes, if they were trying out and made the team that would mean that someone else did NOT make the team.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KimPossible View Post
    To me, this seems akin to me wanting to put Emma on a sports team in our public school instead of her private school because I think the public school team is a better team....or wanting her on the field hockey teacm at the public school because her private school doesn't have one. I think i make certain sacrifices by choosing not to send her to the public school regardless of if i pay taxes or not and so its not reasonable to think those should be options available to me. Plus I dont think there is any inherent right to play whatever specific sport you want, so its not owed to anyone.

    For that reason, I'm leaning towards 'no'.
    I agree with this. I think parents have the right to choose not to send their kids to public school. But if they're going to choose that, they choose to forgo everything that goes with that. If you want your kid to play on a public school team, send your kids to public school. Otherwise, find a private team. Or maybe the homeschoolers could start their own team?
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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    To me it seems kind of petty to say you have to take it all or none. Most the time the reasons parents homeschool have nothing to do with sports. So we tell people that they have to pay the tax bill for other kids to play sports but their kids aren't allowed to play because.... ? It seems to me like people just want to punish these kids in some way because their parents choose to homeschool. If there is a pass or play requirement that is easy, the parent(teacher) needs to sign a statement that the student is passing.
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    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    So we tell people that they have to pay the tax bill for other kids to play sports but their kids aren't allowed to play because....
    Because they have made a conscious decision to not use the school.

    Just like i did. I don't feel punished because my daughter can't partake in public school activities.

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    They are also technically "paying the tax bill for other kids to learn" but their kids aren't learning there.......because they are choosing not to go there. Sometimes you can't have it all in life. So sad. THe child has the choice at any time to enroll in the public school and play sports. They could even continue to learn at home in their spare time if they wanted! Win win.

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