Should homeschooled kids get to play on school sports teams

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KimPossible's picture
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Should homeschooled kids get to play on school sports teams

I took this debate topic from another forum

Home-Schooled Students Fight To Play On Public School Teams : NPR

Legislative battles are being fought around the country over whether or not to let home-schooled students play on public high school teams.

Roughly half of U.S. states have passed laws making them eligible to play on the teams. Advocates have dubbed them "Tim Tebow bills," after the NFL quarterback who was home-schooled when he played on a high school team.

But an attempt by Indiana to find a middle ground may not have solved the problem in that state.

Somewhere In The Middle

In May, the Indiana High School Athletic Association changed its rules to make home-schooled students eligible to play, but they left it up to local schools to decide whether to allow these students on their teams.

"There are those within our membership that are not real excited about this rule change, and that was the reason why there was so much resistance to begin with," says Bobby Cox, who heads the organization.

Cox supported the compromise after lawmakers failed to pass a law in 2011 requiring all schools to allow home-schooled students on their teams. At the time, he lobbied against the bill ? arguing it did not adequately guarantee that home-schooled students meet the same academic standards as public school kids.

Cox says a significant portion of the athletic association believes that when a child decides to be home-schooled, they make a choice to forgo other opportunities.

"On the other side of that ledger, we have those that are in agreement that says, 'Well, a parent should always have the right to educate their child however they want to, however they ought to be able to pick and choose whatever opportunities that are available, from whatever institution or whatever agency,' " says Cox.

Kids At The Heart Of The Debate

Noel Keeble, 15, is the type of student-athlete the athletic association ruled on. He is one of four children home-schooled by his mother, who has a master's degree in education.

Keeble wants to be a professional soccer player, and plays with a private club in the spring. In the fall, he does not have a team to play on.

"All of the club teams let the high school players play for their school team. I do not get seen as much, I do not get as much training as everyone else, and I do not stay as sharp and ready," he says.

Lake Central, the high school that Keeble is zoned to attend, is in a district that has decided not to let home-schooled students play on its sports teams. Aside from academic oversight, the district would require Keeble to take at least one class and pass certain state tests ? and the state does not reimburse districts for home-schoolers.

"It is difficult to justify allowing a true home-school student to participate in our activities when they don't necessarily have the same oversight exercised for our current full-time enrolled students," says Lake Central Principal Robin Tobias.

Keeble's mom, Donna, says that is unfair. After a recent referendum, parents are paying higher taxes; she thinks athletics should be separate from academics.

"If the gym and the weight room and the soccer field are part of those facilities, I just want him to have access to it," she says.

Tradition Influences Laws

Bob Gardner, head of the National Federation of State High School Associations, says some of this conflict is rooted in tradition.

"One of the cardinal principles of all states when they began regulating high school athletics in their state was that a youngster only can participate on a school in which he is enrolled, and taking academic, and passing his academic classes," he says.

The members of Gardner's group are now almost evenly divided. Each year, a few states opt to re-evaluate whether to allow home-schoolers to play on public school teams.

In the meantime, kids like Keeble wait to see if it will ever be their turn on the team.

GloriaInTX's picture
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I don't see why not their taxes are paying for school sports why shouldn't they be able to play?

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I guess I have some questions.

1. Are there requirements that the public school kids must adhere to, that the homeschooled kid wouldn't have to?
2. Does this mean that a kid who goes to the school and tries out for the team might lose his or her spot to a kid who doesn't go to that school?

Joined: 05/31/06
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It brings up a really interesting issue. Like, this kid could conceivably "home school" but really do school for like 2 hours a day and have private soccer coaches all day long and just be using the public school as a venue for recruitment for college scholarships.

It opens up an ugly opportunity for predatory practices, especially in inner cities and basketball or football recruits (basketball, especially, where the kids can go directly to the NBA.....)......sure, now kids like LaBron are being "homeschooled" (aka play ball with special coaches all day) and then play on their local HS team, and go directly into the draft with less education then they were even getting before when they were HS superstars, or were skating through college before entering the draft to play in the NFL. It certainly has the potential for abuse. And is it fair that a kid who can have all of those hours of special coaching time is competing against kids who are in the school that the kid wants to play on the team for? Interesting. As this kid wants to be a "professional soccer player" this is exactly the kind of case that would highlight that sort of thing.

I'd say that MOST of the time its just a normal homeschooled kid looking for some socialization or whatnot, but its hard to argue that in some circumstances it would be very unfair or that the potential for abuse as mentioned above is clearly not there. Its no secret that these kids who have mad bb talent are already totally preyed upon and scouted from the age of 12 or so. It is so not hard to picture a scenario in which a coach or other figure would undertake the role of "homeschooling" prime talent, 100% to their financial benefit, not the kids educational benefit, and obviously that would be a HUGE problem.

Yes, they pay taxes. But then again, they choose not to be a part of the school. Part of me thinks that they don't then get to pick and choose. Like, they don't get to show up for art and theatre but nothing else. Why sports?

KimPossible's picture
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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

I guess I have some questions.

1. Are there requirements that the public school kids must adhere to, that the homeschooled kid wouldn't have to?
2. Does this mean that a kid who goes to the school and tries out for the team might lose his or her spot to a kid who doesn't go to that school?

These are the issues I have with it. I don't know how they would reconcile the requirements academic or otherwise that are typically expected of the public school students with the homeschool students. Maybe in some states, based on homeschool requirements it would be possible, but i would think in other states it wouldn't be.

As to the question about if a public school child should lose their spot to a homeschool child, i don't know.

To me, this seems akin to me wanting to put Emma on a sports team in our public school instead of her private school because I think the public school team is a better team....or wanting her on the field hockey teacm at the public school because her private school doesn't have one. I think i make certain sacrifices by choosing not to send her to the public school regardless of if i pay taxes or not and so its not reasonable to think those should be options available to me. Plus I dont think there is any inherent right to play whatever specific sport you want, so its not owed to anyone.

For that reason, I'm leaning towards 'no'.

Joined: 05/31/06
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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

I guess I have some questions.

1. Are there requirements that the public school kids must adhere to, that the homeschooled kid wouldn't have to?
2. Does this mean that a kid who goes to the school and tries out for the team might lose his or her spot to a kid who doesn't go to that school?

Public school athletes have GPA requirements as well as attendance and behavior requirements that would be impossible to apply to homeschooled kids.

And yes, if they were trying out and made the team that would mean that someone else did NOT make the team.

Alissa_Sal's picture
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"KimPossible" wrote:

To me, this seems akin to me wanting to put Emma on a sports team in our public school instead of her private school because I think the public school team is a better team....or wanting her on the field hockey teacm at the public school because her private school doesn't have one. I think i make certain sacrifices by choosing not to send her to the public school regardless of if i pay taxes or not and so its not reasonable to think those should be options available to me. Plus I dont think there is any inherent right to play whatever specific sport you want, so its not owed to anyone.

For that reason, I'm leaning towards 'no'.

I agree with this. I think parents have the right to choose not to send their kids to public school. But if they're going to choose that, they choose to forgo everything that goes with that. If you want your kid to play on a public school team, send your kids to public school. Otherwise, find a private team. Or maybe the homeschoolers could start their own team?

GloriaInTX's picture
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To me it seems kind of petty to say you have to take it all or none. Most the time the reasons parents homeschool have nothing to do with sports. So we tell people that they have to pay the tax bill for other kids to play sports but their kids aren't allowed to play because.... ? It seems to me like people just want to punish these kids in some way because their parents choose to homeschool. If there is a pass or play requirement that is easy, the parent(teacher) needs to sign a statement that the student is passing.

KimPossible's picture
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So we tell people that they have to pay the tax bill for other kids to play sports but their kids aren't allowed to play because....

Because they have made a conscious decision to not use the school.

Just like i did. I don't feel punished because my daughter can't partake in public school activities.

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They are also technically "paying the tax bill for other kids to learn" but their kids aren't learning there.......because they are choosing not to go there. Sometimes you can't have it all in life. So sad. THe child has the choice at any time to enroll in the public school and play sports. They could even continue to learn at home in their spare time if they wanted! Win win.

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I will say I think it is something that you just have to just move on from if you choose to homeschool vs. public school. I can't enroll my kids in the local vocational school and then want them to be able to play on the traditional hs teams.

As for the tax remark, I find that silly. I pay taxes and I have access to the tennis courts, football field, track etc. when school is not in session. I don't get to join the track team because of that.

I'm thinking unless it's a community rec thing they have to find something else to join.

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There are lots of things that I pay for via taxes that my choices still influence. I pay for jails but choose not to be a criminal and take advantage of their hospitality. Taxes pay for welfare but we choose to work and not receive it. Ditto WIC. I mean, using the "pay taxes" card isn't carte blanche to get whatever one wants. Plus from what I've seen a lot of homeschool families choose to live very frugally, many of them don't even pay federal taxes.

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To me it seems kind of petty to say you have to take it all or none. Most the time the reasons parents homeschool have nothing to do with sports. So we tell people that they have to pay the tax bill for other kids to play sports but their kids aren't allowed to play because.... ? It seems to me like people just want to punish these kids in some way because their parents choose to homeschool. If there is a pass or play requirement that is easy, the parent(teacher) needs to sign a statement that the student is passing.

Well the reasons parents homeschool probably has nothing to do with music but it doesn't mean their kid can get a space in the band. It's probably not acting but they can't star in the school play.

It's not petty or punishing, it's the reality of what those activities are.

There are sports leagues outside of school, the Y, many many options. But you don't get to be on a team representing a school you don't go to, taking a space from someone who does, and not having to fulfill the same requirements as everyone else on the team.

Alissa_Sal's picture
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"GloriaInTX" wrote:

To me it seems kind of petty to say you have to take it all or none. Most the time the reasons parents homeschool have nothing to do with sports. So we tell people that they have to pay the tax bill for other kids to play sports but their kids aren't allowed to play because.... ? It seems to me like people just want to punish these kids in some way because their parents choose to homeschool. If there is a pass or play requirement that is easy, the parent(teacher) needs to sign a statement that the student is passing.

I don't see it as punishment, just a natural consequence of making educational choices. In our district, if there is room (there usually is) you can attend any high school in the district, even if you're technically zoned for a different school. One of the high schools is known for their sports team. Another one is known for their arts/theater program. If I choose to send my kid to the artsy school, should I be allowed to insist that my kid ALSO get to play on the team for the sporty school? Or does my family have to choose which is more important to us? I see this as no different. When you choose an educational path, you are kind of stuck with your choice.

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"GloriaInTX" wrote:

To me it seems kind of petty to say you have to take it all or none. Most the time the reasons parents homeschool have nothing to do with sports. So we tell people that they have to pay the tax bill for other kids to play sports but their kids aren't allowed to play because.... ? It seems to me like people just want to punish these kids in some way because their parents choose to homeschool. If there is a pass or play requirement that is easy, the parent(teacher) needs to sign a statement that the student is passing.

Those other kids' parents are also paying taxes; so are the parents of the kids who aren't playing sports but attend public high school. In a lot of areas sports aren't funded entirely by tax dollars. Some states also have pay-to-play.

My daughter goes to a public high school. Going to this high school was a conscious decision she made knowing full well that she could not participate in sports. Some kids choose to go there; some decide sports is a greater priority. Our community has lots of opportunities to play "club sports" so they aren't missing a lot.

Rivergallery's picture
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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

Well the reasons parents homeschool probably has nothing to do with music but it doesn't mean their kid can get a space in the band. It's probably not acting but they can't star in the school play.

It's not petty or punishing, it's the reality of what those activities are.

There are sports leagues outside of school, the Y, many many options. But you don't get to be on a team representing a school you don't go to, taking a space from someone who does, and not having to fulfill the same requirements as everyone else on the team.

Actually in varies by states, but in most you can... meaning you could just take band.. or chemistry... or physics.. or be on a sports team, or choir or the school play and not participate in the rest.

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"Rivergallery" wrote:

Actually in varies by states, but in most you can... meaning you could just take band.. or chemistry... or physics.. or be on a sports team, or choir or the school play and not participate in the rest.

Taking a class is different from taking up a space that kids vie for and compete for. Taking gym or playing a sport in school where everyone can play is different as well.

Look, if our schools did that (and they might, I have no idea) I certainly wouldn't protest it. It's not that big of a deal to me. But for the purposes of debating, and giving my opinion, it doesn't seem fair to me.

Alissa_Sal's picture
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I agree, Laurie. Schools aren't just a random collection of classes. They are a community, and I feel like the point of sports and other extra-curriculars is to get the kids and families more involved in that community. I don't think it's fair that someone who is purposefully choosing to not be a part of the community would take a spot from a child who is. If it happens, oh well, I'm not passionate about it and I wouldn't complain about it, but I still don't think it's fair. Just like sending my kid to the artsy school and insisting he play on the other high school's team would not be fair. It's not about taxes; my taxes fund the whole district, not just one specific school.

KimPossible's picture
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I think i have a real problem with the academic requirements. All the kids from the public school..the school that team is actually affiliated with...have to meet the requirements based on the schools academic requirements in order to play. Its based on the schools grading, based on the schools classwork and everything else. I don't think any child should be afforded the ability to use some different set of standards, accredited by an authority not affiliated with the school.

As a homeschooler, if you are taking a single class at the school, then you are being graded by the same standards as the rest of the students. If you are participating in something that has no school related requirements...then there is nothing to worry about in that regard.

But with school sports thats not the case and I don't think its okay to use two different standards for two different groups of kids.

SID081108's picture
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I don't think homeschooler's are being picked on here. Kim's example of the private school is a good one. I went to a private Christian College where there was no football team (basketball and soccer were the big sports there). If someone wanted to be a professional football player, they wouldn't come to our school for an education...it just wouldn't make sense. If this 15-year old boy really wants to be a professional soccer player, then maybe his parents should rethink their education decision at this point in order to provide him the opportunities he needs.

KimPossible's picture
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"SID081108" wrote:

I don't think homeschooler's are being picked on here. Kim's example of the private school is a good one. I went to a private Christian College where there was no football team (basketball and soccer were the big sports there). If someone wanted to be a professional football player, they wouldn't come to our school for an education...it just wouldn't make sense. If this 15-year old boy really wants to be a professional soccer player, then maybe his parents should rethink their education decision at this point in order to provide him the opportunities he needs.

Yeah, the school my kids went to in NY was a private school and they had some sports programs which were fine for your average family but i remember this one mom, who's son was in Emma's class, said to me once that her son would not be able to stay at the school for his entire elementary education. She said that he would need to be in a place with stronger sports programs because what they have here wouldn't be enough for him. I thought to myself "How on earth does she know that? They are only in Kindergarten"

Well lo and behold....he just fiished 6th grade at this school and sure enough, she posted his picture on FB and said "[My sons] last day at ____ school" and then posted a nother picture of him and said "He's no longer an [old school mascot] and is now a [new school mascot]" Holding up a LaCrosse shirt from this other private school...one that definitely has a stronger sports program as they have a high school too and start preparing their kids earlier for high school sports.

I guess she decided early on sports are a priority, so she made her decisions accordingly. I think homeschoolers need to do the same thing.

FLSunshineMom's picture
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I am a big supporter of homeschooling if it's done right, and still think it's best if homeschoolers have their own local teams and compete against each other nationwide, IMO. It's true that they (generally) have more time to practice sports if they want to, even if it's just more days per week to practice, because teaching one-on-one or a few at a time naturally takes less time than teaching a whole classroom of students and everything that is involved with large numbers of students vs. only one or a few.

Not sure how it would work in relation to professional sports, though.

Spacers's picture
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Absolutely not, kids should not be allowed on public school teams if they are not public school students. My main concerns are that they might be taking spots away from public school students who don't have other options, that they have an advantage in being able to focus more on their sport than on their academics, and that they aren't part of the school community. I remember during football season, high-five-ing all the football players in the hallways on game days when they were wearing their jerseys; if someone just showed up for games, that would be incredibly weird and I'm not sure I would want to cheer for them because it would feel like their were a ringer for another team or something.

As others have said, when a parent makes a decision about education, it has to encompass *all* aspects, not just academics or morality, but sports, as well. I'm sorry this aspiring professional player doesn't have a league to play in fall, but if the sport is that important to him, then he needs to make a decision. Either find another league in another town to play in fall, or enroll in public school.

mom3girls's picture
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Here home schooled kids can play on the local school team. We have never had a big issue with kids taking spots away from other kids. In fact we had a girl that was on my DDs basketball team at her private school that was not enrolled at the school at the time (she had been in the past but she was being home schooled for a while so the family could figure out her celiac disease by monitoring food intake closely)

MissyJ's picture
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Kim -- sort of a similar scenario question for you: Do the Catholic schools there allow (Catholic) religious-ed students that are from public schools to play on their sports teams? I was surprised when that practice came to light a few years back locally.

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I won't speak for Kim but here the Catholic schools here have their own teams and public school kids cannot join and they couldn't join our teams.

KimPossible's picture
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"MissyJ" wrote:

Kim -- sort of a similar scenario question for you: Do the Catholic schools there allow (Catholic) religious-ed students that are from public schools to play on their sports teams? I was surprised when that practice came to light a few years back locally.

In our situation it is like Jess said. Those in religious ed classes cannot play on the local Catholic School's team. Really, the teams are saturated anyway because the school has a 'No exclusions" policy, which means anyone who wants to play from the school makes the team. (Interesting debate in and of itself Smile )

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Our religious ed classes are separate from the local Catholic schools. My church was in my town and I went to CCD there. The Catholic school kids still had to come to CCD in order to be confirmed. The local Catholic high schools were in other towns and not mine.

KimPossible's picture
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"Jessica80" wrote:

Our religious ed classes are separate from the local Catholic schools. My church was in my town and I went to CCD there. The Catholic school kids still had to come to CCD in order to be confirmed. The local Catholic high schools were in other towns and not mine.

Really? the Catholic school kids still had to go to CCD? I've never heard of that before. Both the Catholic School I went to and the two Catholic schools my kids have gone to didn't require ccd.

I can't even imagine what you would need to go for...odd. I suppose if they never spent anytime addressing the sacraments in school, but i can't imagine why they would do that.

KimPossible's picture
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Actually now that i think about it, there was separate prep fro confirmation...but that was because it was in high school and most kids didn't go to any religious ed there...AND the Catholic high school that i went to was not affiliated with a parish. So confrimation was separate yes, but communion and reconciliation you definitely didn't need to go to ccd for as a catholic school student

See where i am now, the kids make confirmation, communion and reconciliation all in second grade so its a little different.

ETA: Sorry for the derailment!

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Do most towns/areas have sports leagues outside of school? I know ours does, but I don't know if those are everywhere. Then the kids don't need the school teams OR separate teams, they can just join up with everybody else when the season for their sport comes around.

mom3girls's picture
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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

Do most towns/areas have sports leagues outside of school? I know ours does, but I don't know if those are everywhere. Then the kids don't need the school teams OR separate teams, they can just join up with everybody else when the season for their sport comes around.

All sports leagues outside of school are over in middle school when school sponsored athletics start.

GloriaInTX's picture
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"mom3girls" wrote:

All sports leagues outside of school are over in middle school when school sponsored athletics start.

Same here. Once they get to the age they can play sports at school the youth leagues stop, unless it is a sport the school doesn't have. For instance my son played in a Roller Hockey League even in high school because the schools don't have hockey here. There are a few exceptions like the YMCA here still has volleyball teams for high school girls. So it kind of depends on the sport.

KimPossible's picture
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"freddieflounder101" wrote:

Do most towns/areas have sports leagues outside of school? I know ours does, but I don't know if those are everywhere. Then the kids don't need the school teams OR separate teams, they can just join up with everybody else when the season for their sport comes around.

Our town, without having to travel anywhere else, has a few options.
They have a rec soccer program in the fall. It is in bad shape because the guy who used to run it left, since then its been disorganized
They have a rec basketball program and a travel basketball program. Both sometime during the late fall/winter
They have little league in the spring, as well as farm league and t-ball for the younger kids

Thats about it. If you want to play soccer in the spring you can't and other various things like that...so someone like the subject of the article would have a hard time fulfilling their sports ambitions i guess.

You can travel outside of this town, within reasonable distance and there are all sorts of sports options opened up to you. Soccer in the spring and fall....baseball leagues that span from spring through fall...hockey..tons of travel basketball leagues. As long as you aren't insistent on staying in the town borders, you have lots of options available to you that are not school associated.

Edited to add, this programs in both our town and in the larger area offer stuff for both the littlest of kids (age 3 or 4) all the way up through high school

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"mom3girls" wrote:

All sports leagues outside of school are over in middle school when school sponsored athletics start.

We don't have school sponsored athletics in all the middle schools in the valley. The community has various leagues for soccer up through 17 and a league for adults. Not entirely sure on football and baseball. Students who are serious don't just play on the high school sponsored teams.

ClairesMommy's picture
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Here, and I'm not 100% sure, a homeschooled kid or private school kid can play on the 'regular' school sports teams. A percentage of our city tax goes to support either the public or separate (Catholic) school board, and at census time we have to declare one or the other. There is no option for homeschooling or private schools. So if my kid goes to private school and I've declared my support to the public school board for tax purposes then I think my kid would get to play on public school teams since I'm supporting the board financially. Yeah, that's what I think. Wink

AlyssaEimers's picture
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I am sure all States are different in their rules about this. In the States I am familiar with, NY, TN, and GA, private schooled students and homeschoolers are entitled to all services that Public school students are. This is so much more than just sports. I do not know any homeschoolers that play on public school sports teams, but several that go to the public school for Speech therapy. I also know private school students that go to the public school for Speech. That is just how it is done. You pay taxes for that service and it is done through the public school weather or not you go to the public school.

When DH went to a small private school, it worked the same. Private or homeschoolers children were entitled to services (sports or otherwise) at the local school you paid taxes at.

Something to keep in mind. Children are not the ones who decide where they go to school. Should a child not be allowed to use the library,therapist, and teams for which they pay for?

Also, while there are many wonderful homeschoolers out there. However, there are some who are not. I think it is great to get those children out among mandatory reporters. Not jest saying "Well that child's parents don't send them to public school so we don't care about them and they can't be a part of society."

KimPossible's picture
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Something to keep in mind. Children are not the ones who decide where they go to school. Should a child not be allowed to use the library,therapist, and teams for which they pay for?

I don't understand this argument. My kids are subjected to my decisions all the time. That's true for everyone.

Also, while there are many wonderful homeschoolers out there. However, there are some who are not. I think it is great to get those children out among mandatory reporters. Not jest saying "Well that child's parents don't send them to public school so we don't care about them and they can't be a part of society."

School is school not CPS.

And this notion that they can't play sports means we think they shouldn't be part of society is a bit extreme and dramatic. In fact i said i would subject my own daughter to the same rules i would homeschoolers in this regard. I certainly don't view my daughter as an outcast of society.

It is interesting though to see how different states do things. In NY my kids received school bus transportation to their private school. And i did too growing up. But here in Maine they don't offer it. Boy it would be useful for us....but I could never imagine attempting to mandate it in anyway.

Also, something like speech therapy, or physical therapy i see as a very different situation. One could easily argue this is a more vital service for a child to receive and one that is pretty much impossible for a parent to provide themselves unless they are actually a speech therapist or physical therapist. I don't see how this is comparable to a non-vital sports team.

AlyssaEimers's picture
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"KimPossible" wrote:

I don't understand this argument. My kids are subjected to my decisions all the time. That's true for everyone.

School is school not CPS.

And this notion that they can't play sports means we think they shouldn't be part of society is a bit extreme and dramatic. In fact i said i would subject my own daughter to the same rules i would homeschoolers in this regard. I certainly don't view my daughter as an outcast of society.

It is interesting though to see how different states do things. In NY my kids received school bus transportation to their private school. And i did too growing up. But here in Maine they don't offer it. Boy it would be useful for us....but I could never imagine attempting to mandate it in anyway.

Also, something like speech therapy, or physical therapy i see as a very different situation. One could easily argue this is a more vital service for a child to receive and one that is pretty much impossible for a parent to provide themselves unless they are actually a speech therapist or physical therapist. I don't see how this is comparable to a non-vital sports team.

What I meant is you are punishing a child for their parents decisions.

I do think therapy is more important than sports, but if you rule private schooled or homeschoolers do not need public school services that means a lot more than just sports. I know often times those other services have to be really fought for.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

What I meant is you are punishing a child for their parents decisions.

What? No...if the child is being punished...the parent is punishing them with their own decisions not the school. You cannot make the school system responsible for the fact that the parent wants to home school. If someone decides homeschooling is important enough....the fact that the child has to forgo certain things is not THE SCHOOL punishing anyone.

I do think therapy is more important than sports, but if you rule private schooled or homeschoolers do not need public school services that means a lot more than just sports. I know often times those other services have to be really fought for.

My original question was "should a home schooled child be allowed to play on sports teams"

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AlyssaEimers's picture
Joined: 08/22/06
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You can't separate the two. If public schools make it so they do not have to offer service to non public school students, it will mean all services. I could care less about sports, but it would take away so many other necessary services.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

You can't separate the two. If public schools make it so they do not have to offer service to non public school students, it will mean all services. I could care less about sports, but it would take away so many other necessary services.

Sure you can...why not? Some services that schools offer are easy to argue their importance, and difficulty in finding a proper replacement for that important thing. Who says you can't separate them? In NY I got bus service for my kids. But they couldn't play on public school sports teams. Bus service certainly isn't vital, but it's s good example on how you can get some things and not others. Sure things are separable.

Really, I don't have a huge objection to the solution of letting each school district choose, even though it still rubs me the wrong way that a public high school kid could lose a space to a non high school kid and the homeschooler can't be held to the same academic and conduct requirements. I think it's wrong and I'd probably argue against it if it were happening in my district, but each district can have their own battle about it if they need to.

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
Posts: 1535

If that same homeschool kid that was taking a spot away from another kid wanted to play on the team bad enough (so they could be looked at for scholarships) then they could enroll in a few classes and take the spot away anyway. I have no issue with a kid possibly taking a spot away, I think the best kids that live in that district should get the spots.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
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"mom3girls" wrote:

If that same homeschool kid that was taking a spot away from another kid wanted to play on the team bad enough (so they could be looked at for scholarships) then they could enroll in a few classes and take the spot away anyway. I have no issue with a kid possibly taking a spot away, I think the best kids that live in that district should get the spots.

Then that's what they should do, enroll at the school. I agree with alyssa and Laurie, school sports are about more than just an individual's personal goals and desires.

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
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"KimPossible" wrote:

Then that's what they should do, enroll at the school. I agree with alyssa and Laurie, school sports are about more than just an individual's personal goals and desires.

You would be okay with them being there for a PE class and an art class? That would change the whole thing for you? I get that school sports are about more then the just the time on the field, but some schools are not meeting students needs in the classroom and they should have options that do meet their needs without being excluded from the team

Joined: 08/17/04
Posts: 2226

Then you help to change the school system and supplement at home. You don't cherry pick for the good stuff.

You can't say...well I will provide homeschool because I find I can teach my children better than these people but then they are good enough to provide extracurriculars for your kid.

Speech, OT, PT services are different to me, only because locally many times you HAVE to use the school or its not covered by insurance. There are set expectations for those services to be provided through the local school systems.

Sports, clubs, dances. NOPE.

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
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"Jessica80" wrote:

Then you help to change the school system and supplement at home. You don't cherry pick for the good stuff.

You can't say...well I will provide homeschool because I find I can teach my children better than these people but then they are good enough to provide extracurriculars for your kid.

Speech, OT, PT services are different to me, only because locally many times you HAVE to use the school or its not covered by insurance. There are set expectations for those services to be provided through the local school systems.

Sports, clubs, dances. NOPE.

Do you really think it is possible to change the school system in the year that your child needs it? I dont. We have some friends whose DD has dyslexia. That is not considered a learning disability in our state anymore (budget cuts) so they have pulled her and are homeschooling and working with a dyslexia tutor for the next couple years until she is caught up. They are doing what is right for their kid right now, not waiting to see if they can get dyslexia covered by the school in a few years. I would be very sad for this girl if she wanted to participate in a school event but was not allowed.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"mom3girls" wrote:

You would be okay with them being there for a PE class and an art class? That would change the whole thing for you? I get that school sports are about more then the just the time on the field, but some schools are not meeting students needs in the classroom and they should have options that do meet their needs without being excluded from the team

No i said they should enroll in the school, i didn't realize you meant just one or two classes sorry.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"mom3girls" wrote:

Do you really think it is possible to change the school system in the year that your child needs it? I dont. We have some friends whose DD has dyslexia. That is not considered a learning disability in our state anymore (budget cuts) so they have pulled her and are homeschooling and working with a dyslexia tutor for the next couple years until she is caught up. They are doing what is right for their kid right now, not waiting to see if they can get dyslexia covered by the school in a few years. I would be very sad for this girl if she wanted to participate in a school event but was not allowed.

Her parents are trying to do what they think is best for her, i wouldn't be that sad for her.

We forgo things in life all the time based on the decisions we make. But we typically try to choose the path that leads to the best results within our means. That's life!

Joined: 08/17/04
Posts: 2226

I think that sounds like a great option for her and boo to budget cuts for education. We all have to do what we think is right for our kids but that sometimes means that because one thing is a huge priority for you you use that to base your decisions.

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